Tag: Gerrit Cole

Hisahi Iwakuma

And That Happened: Wednesday’s scores and highlights


source: Getty Images

Mariners 3, Orioles 0: Hisashi Iwakuma with the no-no. He walked three and struck out seven. It’s been a not-great year for both Iwakuma and the M’s, but this will at least give them something to put on the highlight reel. You’ve probably seen the final out highlight a few times since yesterday, but don’t sleep on Kyle Seager’s sweet catch in foul territory in the ninth to keep things going:

Mets 3, Rockies 0: Midseason additions Juan Uribe and Yoenis Cespedes each knock in a run, Cespedes on a homer, and Jacob deGrom continues to be ridiculous, striking out 10 in seven innings. Question: did the Rockies even bring their bats to New York?

Indians 2, Yankees 1: The Yankees; offensive struggles continue, this time managing only one run against Danny Salazar and the Tribe. And with that New York falls out of first place in the AL East. Maybe, like the Nationals, they have a veteran on the team who thinks it’s actually better to be in second place. I sort of doubt it, but I didn’t think such a beast existed before yesterday, so who knows?

Blue Jays 10, Athletics 3: Ten straight wins for Toronto and that puts them in first place. Chris Colabello and Justin Smoak, each castoffs from other teams, went deep with three-run shots. Josh Donaldson, who the A’s figured would be cool to trade away, knocked in two more runs giving him 85 on the year. And R.A. Dickey pitched well, giving the Jays their sixteenth straight game in which their starter has allowed three or fewer earned runs. They have one more this afternoon against the A’s and then weekend they face the Yankees in Toronto. It’s gonna be nuts.

Marlins 14, Red Sox 6: The Fish put up a ten-run sixth inning during which rookie J.T. Realmuto drove in five all by himself. He drove in six runs overall on the day. All this from a guy whose name sounds like something a kid make up on the spot when caught by a security guard with a spray paint can or something.

“Hey, you! Put that can down! What’s your name, kid?”

“It’s um . . . J.T. . . uhhh . . .Re . . .al . . .muto.”

“No, wait a minute. I know your parents. You’re Beth and Ryan Hogard’s son. That’s it, I’m calling your father!”

“Aw, man.”

Meanwhile, David Ortiz hit two homers in a winning effort in a losing cause.

Astros 2, Giants 0: Five pitchers, led by Scott Feldman, combine to toss a five-hit shutout for the Astros. Chris Heston allowed a homer to Colby Rasmus but otherwise pitched well. Ya need help, though.

Phillies 7, Diamondbacks 6: Down by one, the Phillies put up a four-run sixth inning capped by a Cameron Rupp three-run homer. He also had a sac fly in the game giving him four RBI. Rupp also made a nice swipe tag on a play at the plate that went to replay review and was upheld. Here’s Dbacks manager Chip Hale after the call went against him:

“I thought he was safe. I guess it wasn’t enough evidence,” Hale said. “That’s what you always hear. That’s their excuse. Not enough evidence. That’s the way it goes.”

You mad, bro?  The Phillies avoid the sweep. 

Reds 7, Padres 3: Matt Kemp hit a first inning three-run homer, but that’s all the Padres would do. Joey Votto hit a two-run homer. He also scored on a balk by James Shields, who has not won in 13 starts. Only three years left on that $75 million deal.


Rays 9, Braves 6: The Braves blew a four-run lead in the seventh when the Rays put up a six-spot. Curt Casali hit a two-run homer that inning along with a James Loney RBI double and a Logan Forsythe sacrifice fly. There was also a wild pitch and some clownshoes Braves defense in the mix. Personally, I spent my evening watching the Perseid meteor shower. It was far more engaging.

Cardinals 4, Pirates 2: Michael Wacha beats Gerrit Cole, giving the former his 14th win and leaving the latter at 14 wins, which ties both of them with Felix Hernandez for tops in the game. This was the Yadier Molina show, though. He had an RBI triple thanks to a poor decision in the outfield by Gregory Polanco, who let the ball get by him. He also stole a dang base — third base! — and threw out Polanco trying to steal.

Cubs 3, Brewers 2: Assuming, as it often safe to assume, that a wild pitch is a joint failure of catcher and pitcher, Miguel Montero contributed to this one going to extra innings when a wild pitch went past him in the ninth to tie the score. But he atoned just fine, thanks, by hitting the walkoff homer for the Cubs sixth straight win and their 12th in 13 games. Chicago is only a game and a half behind Pittsburgh for second place in the Central and first place in the NL Wild Card race.

White Sox 3, Angels 2: Avisail Garcia doubled in Jose Abreu in the 13th for the walkoff win. There was some controversy here in the ninth inning when the Angels tied it up, though. Angels shortstop Erick Aybar struck out to lead off the ninth against Dave Robertson. The ball was in the dirt, so catcher Tyler Flowers reached out to tag Aybar on the leg and was called out, but Aybar still broke for first base. A replay challenge ensued on whether the tag was made. After the out was confirmed, Mike Scioscia came out to argue and/or get an explanation from the home plate umpire. As he did so, he stood in front of home plate. After the game Robertson, who went on to blow the save that inning and force extras, called the move “bush league” by Scioscia, claiming that he was delaying the game by arguing and implying that he did so in that exact spot to keep Robertson from getting loose during the replay delay. Scioscia denied it. Fun, fun times.

Tigers 7, Royals 4: Detroit rallied with a four-run eighth inning and added one more in the ninth. The rally started against Edinson Volquez, who Ned Yost left to begin the eighth inning rather than go to Kelvin Herrera. Herrera was eventually called upon and let a couple of inherited runners score. Defensible given where Volquez’s pitch count was, I suppose, and the Royals lead in the Central is so big that it kind of doesn’t matter I guess. It’s the kind of decision that Yost would be wise to avoid when the games matter a bit more in October.

Twins 11, Rangers 1: Miguel Sano homered twice as the Twins win in a laugher. Both of his shots were absolute rockets that went upper deck. They were almost as impressive as the Perseid meteor shower.

Dodgers 3, Nationals 0: Clayton Kershaw with eight strikeouts in eight shutout innings. He was perfect through six. He also crossed the 200-strikeout mark and it was only August 12. It’s his sixth straight year of 200Ks, which matches Koufax and Tom Seaver for the lead in that department in the National League. I assumed Nolan Ryan, like, doubled up on that at some point but even he never had six-straight 200K seasons. Which is sort of amazing to me, but that’s how streaks go I guess. And that’s how crazy consistent Kershaw has been.

And That Happened: Sunday’s scores and highlights

David Ortiz

Red Sox 11, Tigers 1: David Ortiz had a monster game, hitting two homers and driving in seven. The game story says Ortiz was motivated by his emotional reaction to watching Pedro Martinez get inducted into the Hall of Fame earlier in the day. OK, we’ll go with that and not facing a struggling Shane Greene and one of the worst bullpens in baseball. In other news, last week it was reported that the Tigers would reassess whether they would be buyers or sellers after Sunday’s game. Well, you’ve played your Sunday game. Now, general manager Dombrowski of ours, I think it’s time you told your Don what everyone seems to know: this Tigers season is over.

Mets 3, Dodgers 2: Juan Uribe, acquired from the Braves Friday night, won the game with a walkoff single — which almost went out — in the 10th inning. Before that, however, the fans were treated to a duel between two of the game’s best pitchers in Zack Greinke and Jacob deGrom. Advantage: deGrom, as the Mets ace shut the Dodgers out into the eighth and struck out eight. Meanwhile, Greinke’s scoreless inning streak came to an end at 45 and two-thirds when deGrom knocked in a run on a fielder’s choice in the third. Here’s something weird: Jeurys Familia, who was trying for a four-out save, blew it. The weird part: it was his fourth blown save this year and the Mets have come back to win all four of them.

Angels 13, Rangers 7: Not sure what’s more impressive: Mike Trout hitting this grand slam or the fan catching it in his “Trout Net?”


Trout hit a solo homer in this one too and finished 4-for-4 with five driven in. He takes over the league lead in homers from teammate Albert Pujols. More importantly, the Angels end a three-game losing streak and regain first place over the Astros.

Giants 4, Athletics 3: By beating the A’s, Tim Hudson has now beaten every single team in baseball. Current team, anyway. I mean, he hasn’t beaten the original Buffalo Bisons, the Providence Grays or the Cincinnati Outlaw Reds, but that’s no slight on Hudson. He’s the 15th pitcher to do that. Matt Duffy hit a two-run homer in the first and drove in three runs to help Hudson’s cause.

White Sox 2, Indians 1: Carlos Rodon pitched shutout ball into the seventh inning helping the Chisox get the four-game sweep over a team I thought might turn things around after the All-Star break but, like, never mind. The Sox outscored the Indians 26-5 and never trailed in the series.

Orioles 5, Rays 2: Nolan Reimold had three hits and drove in two runs. Caleb Joseph hit a two-run homer. In five starts since coming back from Tommy John surgery, Matt Moore has yet to pitch longer than five innings. The Rays are skidding, having dropped eight of their last nine series.

Pirates 3, Nationals 1: Gerrit Cole won his 14th game — that leads the bigs — after allowing one run on seven hits in seven and two-thirds. According to the AP, Cole is the first Pittsburgh pitcher with 14 wins before August since Dock Ellis in 1971. Which is to say he is doing the do.

Royals 5, Astros 1: Last week Yordano Ventura was sent to the minors because he was lost and the Royals lost another pitcher in Jason Vargas due to Tommy John surgery. Last night they went to bed with Johnny Cueto on the team and Ventura having pitched seven innings of one-run ball against one of the best offenses in baseball. Not a bad turnaround.

Yankees 7, Twins 2: Nate Eovaldi won his tenth game, pitching into the ninth inning, and Chase Headley and Stephen Drew each homered. Headley drove in three. This a day after Alex Rodriguez hit three homers. Remember back in the winter when people wondered how those two would both work on this team? Haha, me neither.

Braves 3, Cardinals 2: Adonis Garcia broke the tie with a sixth inning homer. Which required me to go look up who in the hell Adonis Garcia was again. Sometimes it’s fun and enlightening when your team is rebuilding. Rookie Matt Wisler got the win and pitched well. Which was easier to do with Yadier Molina, Jhonny Peralta and Mark Reynolds taking the day off.

Phillies 11, Cubs 5: Man, not a great weekend for the Cubs. Not merely swept by the Phillies, but no-hit and blown out too. Aaron Nola got his first big league win and drove in a run and Ryan Howard homered for the second straight day. The Phillies have won eight of nine since the All-Star break. After the game Nola said “I’m just soaking as much as I can in right now and being a part of this is pretty amazing.” He’s talking about the 2015 Philadelphia Phillies, by the way.


Mariners 6, Blue Jays 5: Franklin Gutierrez hit a walkoff homer in the 10th. His comeback, a year after sitting out all year with a back condition, is pretty impressive so far. That’s his third homer in 19 games and he’s slugging .511. So good to see from a player who has been absolutely snakebitten with injuries and maladies. Of course this triple play was the highlight of the game:


Ezeiquel Carrera would’ve been safe if he didn’t fall off the bag. And otherwise he didn’t have a bad game — he robbed Mike Zunino of a home run and hit a solo homer of his own — but that one is gonna stick with him for a while.

Padres 3, Marlins 2: Justin Upton homered and Odrisamer Despaigne pitched six solid innings and the Padres win their third in a row and the fifth in the past eight games since the break. Have to figure they’re still sellers but winning does sort of mess up the narrative when it comes time to trade away everyone you just brought in to, you know, win.

Rockies 17, Reds 7: That thing about the Royals up above? The opposite for Cincinnati. They lost Johnny Cueto and then had their young pitcher get his rear end handed back to him. The Rockies hit five homers — two from Carlos Gonzalez — and had a ten-run third inning against Michael Lorenzen and Dylan Axlerod. Axlerod wore this one, giving up eight runs himself in an inning and a third.

Diamondbacks 3, Brewers 0: The Brewers were shut out by Dbacks pitchers for the second straight day. This day Jeremy Hellickson did the honors, tossing six shutout innings. Milwaukee scored just five runs in the four-game series.

Chasing Hershiser: Inside the numbers during Zack Greinke’s scoreless streak

Zack Greinke

Dodgers starter Zack Greinke extended his scoreless innings streak to 43 2/3 innings with eight shutout frames against the Nationals on Sunday. It’s the longest streak since former Dodgers pitcher Orel Hershiser set the major league record with 59 scoreless innings during the 1988 season. Greinke, overall, scattered three hits with a walk and 11 strikeouts. He now has a 9-2 record with a 1.30 ERA, a 0.82 WHIP, and a 117/21 K/BB ratio in 131 1/3 innings.

Hershiser’s streak spanned seven starts between August 30 and September 28. He allowed two runs to the Expos in the fifth inning before finishing out the rest of the season in scoreless fashion. He was in the midst of eight consecutive complete games and would’ve made it nine had the game in which he made his final start of the season not gone 16 innings — he went 10. Greinke’s streak thus far has spanned six starts, beginning in the first inning on June 18 against the Rangers. The pitchers’ respective stat lines during those spans of time:

  • Hershiser: 7 GS, 64 IP (9 1/3 IP per start), 36 H, 2 ER, 11 BB, 43 K
  • Greinke: 6 GS, 43 2/3 IP (7 1/3 IP per start), 19 H, 0 ER, 4 BB, 42 K

ESPN Stats & Info notes that Greinke is only the third pitcher in the modern era (since 1900) to rack up six consecutive scoreless starts in a season. Hershiser and Hideo Nomo are the others. They also point out that opposing hitters have hit to the tune of a .094 batting average against Greinke’s fastball, which is 53 points lower than any other qualified pitcher in that span of time.

According to Baseball Reference, Greinke is also the 14th pitcher since 1914 to rack up at least six starts of at least six innings each while limiting the opposition to four or fewer hits in each outing. It’s an eclectic list:

Name Strk Start End Games Tm
Johan Santana 2004-06-15 2004-08-01 10 MIN
Ted Lilly 2011-09-17 2012-05-07 8 LAD
A.J. Burnett 2007-08-12 2007-09-13 7 TOR
Garrett Richards 2014-06-04 2014-07-01 6 LAA
Matt Harvey 2012-09-19 2013-04-24 6 NYM
Carlos Zambrano 2010-09-04 2010-10-02 6 CHC
Carlos Zambrano 2006-05-16 2006-06-10 6 CHC
Pedro Martinez 2006-04-22 2006-05-20 6 NYM
Sid Fernandez 1989-09-21 1990-04-22 6 NYM
Mark Langston 1988-08-29 1988-09-24 6 SEA
Jim Palmer 1972-05-05 1972-05-28 6 BAL
Nolan Ryan 1971-04-29 1971-05-29 6 NYM
Bob Feller 1946-07-24 1946-08-13 6 CLE
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Play Index Tool Used
Generated 7/19/2015.

By the way, it’s going to take some work to overcome Greinke in the NL Cy Young Award race. With Sunday’s outing, Greinke expanded his ERA lead to 79 points over Max Scherzer, 1.30 to 2.09. Four other hurlers are on the periphery: A.J. Burnett (2.11), Jacob deGrom (2.14), Gerrit Cole (2.30), and Shelby Miller (2.33). For Greinke to get his ERA back to 2.00, at his current rate of about seven innings per start, he would need to allow 30 runs over his next 84 innings over 12 starts, which is the equivalent of a 3.21 ERA.

HBT First-Half Awards: National League Cy Young

Max Scherzer

With no baseball on Wednesday or Thursday, we’re taking stock of the best performances of the first half of the season by handing out midseason awards. Maybe someday we’ll have the budget for an actual Midseason Award Trophy, but for now they merely get our kind and admiring words. Next up: National League Cy Young Award.

Craig Calcaterra‘s ballot:

1. Max Scherzer, Washington Nationals
2. Zack Greinke, Los Angeles Dodgers
3. Clayton Kershaw, Los Angeles Dodgers

Zack Greinke is making some ERA history at the moment, what with his microscopic 1.39 ERA. In terms of ERA+ — which adjusts for park and era and compares him with other pitchers in the league — Greinke is at an astounding 265. To put that in perspective, the year Bob Gibson set the modern ERA record for starters with a 1.12 mark, his ERA+ was 258. Greinke also leads the NL in pitching WAR, by a wide margin pursuant to the folks at Baseball-Reference.com and a smaller margin by the guys at FanGraphs.

Still, ERA ain’t perfect, even if Greinke’s margin in that category is pushing a full run over A.J. Burnett and Max Scherzer. And, quibble with me if you want as I am not a hardcore stats guy, but pitching WAR always gets a bit of the side eye from me.

That’s why I’m going with Max Scherzer. A guy who while “only” posting an ERA of 2.11 has a better WHIP, better strikeout ratios, better fielding independent pitching numbers and a lower opponent’s batting average than Greinke and just about everyone else. He has an astounding strikeout-to-walk ratio of 10.71 which, if it holds, will be one of the best marks in that category in history. Scherzer leads the NL in innings pitched, complete games, shutouts and batters faced as well. To me he’s the clear choice, even with that microscopic Greinke ERA.

Kershaw? Well, I feel like it’s a two-horse race here and I figured the third horse may as well be the guy leading the league in strikeouts and strikeouts per nine innings pitched. He also leads the league in xFIP while coming in second in FIP. The guy has pitched in some bad luck, especially dingers-wise. If that’s not good enough, I have him here so you deadenders who insist that he doesn’t “have what it takes” in the playoffs or some such can get mad.

Aaron Gleeman‘s ballot:

1. Zack Greinke, Los Angeles Dodgers
2. Max Scherzer, Washington Nationals
3. Gerrit Cole, Pittsburgh Pirates

There are definitely other compelling arguments to be made–for Max Scherzer leading the league in innings pitched and having the best all-around numbers, or for Clayton Kershaw being the best pitcher on the planet and leading the league in strikeouts. Ultimately, though, I’m a simple man and when someone goes into the All-Star break with the best first-half ERA by any starting pitcher since 1968 they get my vote.

Zack Greinke’s secondary numbers aren’t as good as his historic ERA, but they’re pretty damn good and his ERA is 1.39. One-thirty-nine. Greinke also ranks second to Scherzer in innings pitched and opponents’ batting average, is currently riding a 35.2-inning scoreless streak, and blows away the competition in Win Probability Added. I think there’s a strong chance Scherzer will wind up being the most deserving pitcher at the end of the season, but in the meantime I’ll ride with Greinke.

Zack Greinke and Dallas Keuchel named All-Star starters

Zack Greinke AP

All-Star managers Bruce Bochy and Ned Yost have chosen their starting pitchers, with right-hander Zack Greinke of the Dodgers getting the assignment for the National League and left-hander Dallas Keuchel of the Astros being the pick for the American League.

Greinke’s excellence is well known. He’s a three-time All-Star and former Cy Young winner who currently has a 35.2-inning scoreless streak and an MLB-best 1.39 ERA that’s the lowest by any starting pitcher at the All-Star break since 1968.

The other starting pitchers on the NL roster are Madison Bumgarner, A.J. Burnett, Gerrit Cole, Jacob deGrom, Carlos Martinez, Clayton Kershaw, Shelby Miller, Max Scherzer, and Michael Wacha.

Keuchel is a great story. He was never considered a top prospect, had a losing record with a 3.74 ERA in the minors, and went 9-18 with a 5.20 ERA for the Astros in 2012 and 2013. Then last season he took a huge step forward, throwing 200 innings with a 2.93 ERA, and Keuchel has been even better this season with an 11-4 record and 2.23 ERA in a league-high 137 innings.

The other starting pitchers on the AL roster are Chris Archer, Sonny Gray, Felix Hernandez, David Price, Chris Sale, and Hector Santiago.

Last year’s All-Star starters were Adam Wainwright of the Cardinals for the National League and Felix Hernandez of the Mariners for the American League.