Tag: Freddy Sanchez

Freddy Sanchez injured

Freddy Sanchez isn’t ready to retire despite lack of offers


Last month Freddy Sanchez’s agent said “about 20 teams” requested the oft-injured second baseman’s medical records, but they must not have liked what they saw because the 35-year-old free agent remains unsigned.

However, yesterday agent Paul Cobbe told Andrew Baggarly of CSNBayArea.com that Sanchez “is not looking to hang ’em up by any means” and is willing to sign somewhere as a bench player.

Sanchez hasn’t played since dislocating his shoulder in mid-2011 and had tons of injuries before that as well, so he’d no doubt have to settle for a minor-league deal. Cobbe called re-signing with the Giants a “dream scenario” for Sanchez, but it sounds like the feeling isn’t mutual.

Twenty teams have called about Freddy Sanchez? OK.

freddy sanchez batting getty

Freddy Sanchez hasn’t played a game in the majors since June 10, 2011. The reason: shoulder and back surgeries, each of which can, independently, drain a big leaguer of any value he once had. But teams are willing, apparently, to at least give him a chance:

Interest in free-agent second baseman Freddy Sanchez has picked up since the start of the New Year, agent Paul Cobbe told ESPN.com’s Jerry Crasnick. About 20 teams have asked to take a look at Sanchez’s medical records, Cobbe said.

If it’s from the agent take it with a grain of salt, but it would not be shocking to see someone take a chance on Sanchez, hoping for a low-risk addition that could, possibly, bring along some offensive upside. Think of it as an Eric Chavez-lite situation.

Freddy Sanchez holding out hope for return this season

Freddy Sanchez AP

Freddy Sanchez hasn’t played a game in the majors since June 10 of last year following shoulder and back surgeries, but he’s still hoping to help the Giants as a pinch-hitter down the stretch.

According to Andrew Baggarly of CSNBayArea.com, Sanchez is currently working out at the Giants’ complex in Scottsdale and could begin playing in instructional league games as soon as Monday.

Sanchez began this season on the disabled list following surgery last August to repair a torn labrum in his right shoulder. The 34-year-old second baseman suffered numerous setbacks before undergoing surgery on his back on July 5 to address a nerve issue which was affecting his leg strength. Giants trainer Dave Groeschner still considers a return “highly unlikely,” but Sanchez is willing to help in any way he can.

“There’s obviously no room right now and everybody is doing great, so I realize it’s a tough situation,” Sanchez told me by phone on Friday. “Ryan Theriot, Joaquin Arias, Marco Scutaro, all those guys have been there and are playing great. Sometimes you can’t mess with that.

“But my goal was to always come back this year. If I can be a bat off the bench, or help in any way, I want to be there.”

Sanchez was a key part of the Giants’ World Series run in 2010, but he has made $18 million over the past three seasons while appearing in just 171 games.

The latest “oh noes, Melky can’t win the batting title!” column

Melky Cabrera

The argument that Melky Cabrera should not be allowed to win the 2012 batting title because of his drug suspension was dumb a couple of weeks ago and it’s dumb again today. From Morosi:

The batting race, though, is one instance in which MLB must act — and it doesn’t need to be that complicated.

MLB should add an additional criterion for the batting and ERA titles: Players suspended for a PED offense must be automatically disqualified, because their violations gave them an unfair statistical advantage, on top of the obvious cheating … MLB can’t allow players to benefit statistically by stopping the clock on their season through PED use. That’s like a high-school student receiving an “A” on a test he missed because he was suspended for fighting in the cafeteria.

Setting aside the fact that many, many hitters have won batting titles despite having the advantage of a shorter season, Morosi falls far short of making a compelling case here. Sure, he talks about all the ways baseball could deal with the Melky problem — it would be easy to disqualify him, I’ll grant that —  but he never makes a case as to why baseball, or any of us, should care if Melky Caberea wins the batting title in the first place.

As Matthew noted a couple of weeks ago, the batting title isn’t an an award. It is not some endorsement by the league or an honor bestowed on a worthy competitor. It is a statistical measure and nothing more. It is a function of math, and it only matters to people in direct proportion to the weight they place in it.

And it’s certainly not significant like an MVP award. Quick: name two of the past ten NL batting champions. I bet you can’t. Because, sadly, winning a batting title did not place Freddy Sanchez into some Hall of Immortals atop a great mountain someplace. It just happened and why in the hell should any of us who are not related to Mr. Sanchez care?

Same goes for Melky. If he wins the batting title, it will be remembered only because of its dubiousness. The world will not end. It will not impact the economy or the schools and it will not send any child off into a life of crime. It would affect nothing other than the level of indignation people who like to be indignant about such things feel.

As I said last month, the idea of stripping people of awards and attempting top scrub history is nothing more than emotion-driven post-hoc righteous reactionary retribution. If you want to change the rule going forward and make a guy ineligible to be the batting champ or home run champ or whatever after a suspension, fine, do it. That’s how laws and rules work: prospectively.  But suddenly saying “Melky can’t be the batting champ!” is a silly emotional balm for people who should know better than to put that much damn weight into a statistical contest.

We can’t let Melky Cabrera have the batting title/crown/award!

Melky Cabrera

In the name of all that is holy!

Kenny Albert and Tim McCarver made it very clear during Saturday’s FOX Red Sox-Yankees broadcast that we can’t allow Melky Cabrera to win the NL batting title after his steroids suspension this week. In fact, it seems we need a new rule to prevent players who receive steroid suspension from being eligible for such awards.

And I can actually see the latter point. The BBWAA might want to consider a rule that prevents such players from qualifying for postseason awards.

But the batting title isn’t an an award. It doesn’t exist as anything more than a sacrifice fly crown or a passed ball champion does. It’s made up, and it only matters to people who any weight into it.

The truth is that very few people care about the batting title anymore. It definitely meant something in the days of Joe DiMaggio and Ted Williams, and it was still a big honor in the era of Tony Gwynn and Wade Boggs.

Now? Did anyone besides the Mets really care that Jose Reyes won the NL batting crown last year? Does anyone even know that Carlos Gonzalez won it in 2010 or Hanley Ramirez did in 2009? I’m guessing even Pirates fans scarcely remember that Freddy Sanchez won the NL batting title in 2006.

My whole feeling on the subject of asterisks and the like is that you leave the statistics alone and then you decide for yourself what they mean. Regardless of how he did it, Melky Cabrera hit .346 with 11 homers and 60 RBI this season, and it’d be foolish for anyone to try to tamper with that.