Tag: Fernando Rodney

Fernando Rodney

Fernando Rodney replaces David Price on the American League All-Star roster


Ken Rosenthal of FOX Sports reports that Mariners reliever Fernando Rodney will replace David Price on the American League All-Star team. Price was scratched from tonight’s start due to an illness, but hopes to pitch on Sunday, the final game before the All-Star break. If Price happens to start tomorrow, he would have had the option to pitch one inning maximum in the All-Star Game. He’s chosen to give up his spot.

Rosenthal notes that the selection of Rodney is curious, given that he was not one of the five finalists on the American League Final Vote, which was wrapped up on Thursday. Chris Sale won over Garrett Richards, Corey Kluber, Dallas Keuchel, and Rick Porcello. In particular, Rosenthal suggests Richards would have been a better selection.

A look at Price, Rodney, and Richards statistically:

  • Price: 3.42 ERA, 139 2/3 innings, 159/20 K/BB (leads the league in strikeouts)
  • Rodney: 1.98 ERA, 36 1/3 innings, 42/12 K/BB, 27 saves (leads league)
  • Richards: 2.55 ERA, 123 1/3 innings, 127/43 K/BB (leads the league with an .846 winning percentage)

The 2014 All-Star rosters have been announced

Jose Bautista

Here are your starters for each league in the 2014 All-Star Game, held at Target Field in Minnesota on July 15.

American League Position Players

  • C: Salvador Perez, Kansas City Royals (replacing Matt Wieters, Baltimore Orioles due to injury)
  • 1B: Miguel Cabrera, Detroit Tigers
  • 2B: Robinson Cano, Seattle Mariners
  • 3B: Josh Donaldson, Oakland Athletics
  • SS: Derek Jeter, New York Yankees
  • OF: Jose Bautista, Toronto Blue Jays
  • OF: Mike Trout, Los Angeles Angels of Anahem
  • OF: Adam Jones, Baltimore Orioles
  • DH: Nelson Cruz, Baltimore Orioles

Jose Bautista was the leading vote-getter in the AL with 5.85 million. Trout had the second-most with 5.56 million.

[ MORE: Chris Sale, Anthony Rizzo among those on All-Star game Final Vote list ]

Nothing too shocking here. Jose Abreu and Edwin Encarnacion were also worthy candidates at first base. One could argue that Ian Kinsler and Jose Altuve were both better starting options at second base. Donaldson was snubbed last season, so it’s good to see him get some respect this season. Obviously, Jeter got the starting nod in his final season before heading off into retirement. In any other season, Alcides Escobar or Erick Aybar get the starting spot at short. The outfield was quite crowded, but it’s hard to argue with those three. Maybe Michael Brantley over Jones.

National League Position Players

  • C: Yadier Molina, St. Louis Cardinals
  • 1B: Paul Goldschmidt, Arizona Diamondbacks
  • 2B: Chase Utley, Philadelphia Phillies
  • 3B: Aramis Ramirez, Milwaukee Brewers
  • SS: Troy Tulowitzki, Colorado Rockies
  • OF: Andrew McCutchen, Pittsburgh Pirates
  • OF: Carlos Gomez, Milwaukee Brewers
  • OF: Yasiel Puig, Los Angeles Dodgers

Troy Tulowitzki got the most votes in the NL, with 5.35 million.

Brewers fans won’t be happy with Molina starting over Jonathan Lucroy, given recent history. Can’t argue with Goldschmidt at first. Utley was by far the best second baseman over the first two months, but has slumped terribly over the last six weeks, so his numbers are comparable to the rest of the top NL second basemen. Todd Frazier has been the best third baseman in the NL, but not by enough where it’s a travesty that Ramirez got the nod over him. Giancarlo Stanton is an obvious omission in the starting outfield, but he was told he’ll be the NL’s starting DH.

The pitchers and reserves:

American League Pitchers

  • Yu Darvish, Texas Rangers
  • Max Scherzer, Detroit Tigers
  • Felix Hernandez, Seattle Mariners
  • Masahiro Tanaka, New York Yankees
  • Jon Lester, Boston Red Sox
  • David Price, Tampa Bay Rays
  • Scott Kazmir, Oakland Athletics
  • Mark Buehrle, Toronto Blue Jays


  • Sean Doolittle, Oakland Athletics
  • Greg Holland, Kansas City Royals
  • Glen Perkins, Minnesota Twins
  • Dellin Betances, New York Yankees

Chris Sale is a notable omission, though he has only logged 87 1/3 innings this season due to injury. Garrett Richards, Corey Kluber, Dallas Keuchel, Sonny Gray, Rick Porcello, and Chris Archer are all on the cusp. You’ll see some of them in the Final Vote. Manager John Farrell will have a tough choice deciding who to start.

There are a ton of deserving relievers but only four spots, so it’s tough to hate the selections. Koji Uehara, Fernando Rodney, and David Robertson are three of a bushel of American League relievers who deserve recognition.

National League Pitchers

  • Johnny Cueto, Cincinnati Reds
  • Clayton Kershaw, Los Angeles Dodgers
  • Zack Greinke, Los Angeles Dodgers
  • Madison Bumgarner, San Francisco Giants
  • Adam Wainwright, St. Louis Cardinals
  • Tyson Ross, San Diego Padres
  • Jordan Zimmermann, Washington Nationals
  • Julio Teheran, Atlanta Braves
  • Jeff Samardzija, Chicago Cubs (now with the Oakland Athletics; will be inactive for the All-Star Game)


  • Craig Kimbrel, Atlanta Braves
  • Aroldis Chapman, Cincinnati Reds
  • Tony Watson, Pittsburgh Pirates
  • Francisco Rodriguez, Milwaukee Brewers
  • Pat Neshek, St. Louis Cardinals

A few deserving NL starters were left out: Henderson Alvarez, Josh Beckett, Tim Hudson, Cole Hamels, Madison Bumgarner. On the relieving side, Huston Street, Rafael Soriano, and Jonathan Papelbon are on the outside looking in despite fantastic seasons as their respective teams’ closers.

American League Reserves

  • C: Derek Norris, Oakland Athletics
  • C: Kurt Suzuki, Minnesota Twins
  • 1B: Edwin Encarnacion, Toronto Blue Jays (injured yesterday, likely to be replaced)
  • 1B: Brandon Moss, Oakland Athletics
  • 1B: Jose Abreu, Chicago White Sox
  • 2B: Jose Altuve, Houston Astros
  • 3B: Adrian Beltre, Texas Rangers
  • SS: Alexei Ramirez, Chicago White Sox
  • OF: Michael Brantley, Cleveland Indians
  • OF: Yoenis Cespedes, Oakland Athletics
  • OF: Alex Gordon, Kansas City Royals
  • DH: Victor Martinez, Detroit Tigers

National League Reserves

  • C: Jonathan Lucroy, Milwaukee Brewers
  • C: Devin Mesoraco, Cincinnati Reds
  • 1B: Freddie Freeman, Atlanta Braves
  • 2B: Dee Gordon, Los Angeles Dodgers
  • 2B: Daniel Murphy, New York Mets
  • 3B: Matt Carpenter, St. Louis Cardinals
  • 3B: Todd Frazier, Cincinnati Reds
  • SS: Starlin Castro, Chicago Cubs
  • OF: Giancarlo Stanton, Miami Marlins
  • OF: Josh Harrison, Pittsburgh Pirates
  • OF: Hunter Pence, San Francisco Giants
  • OF: Charlie Blackmon, Colorado Rockies

And That Happened: Tuesday’s scores and highlights

Dallas Keuchel

Astros 8, Rangers 0: Dallas Keuchel tossed a seven-hit shutout. I’m obligated by The Guild to say he scattered those hits. L.J. Hoes drove in three. Meanwhile, Matt Harrison left the game with back stiffness early.

Angels 4, Phillies 3: There was an awful lot of Philly-based press about Mike Trout yesterday, seeing as though he’s from nearby Millville, New Jersey. It was like a kid from nearby coming to play a game in May was Philly’s World Series or something. As it was, Trout’s slump continued and he was a non-factor here. Defense was a factor, as in Cody Asche committing not one, but two errors in the sixth inning allowing all four of Anaheim’s runs to score and all of them to be unearned.

Tigers 4, Orioles 1: A 1-0 lead in the ninth and Tommy Hunter on the hill was not enough here. Hunter surrendered back-to-back homers to Miguel Cabrera and Victor Martinez and — bam! — that was that. Really, it sounded like “bam!” when the home runs were hit. That’s not me trying to add color here.

Padres 2, Reds 1: That stuff I said on Monday about Aroldis Chapman being the Terminator or whatever? Well, anyway. Chapman surrendered a ninth inning homer to Chase Headley after entering a tied game. That was only the third hit of the game for the Padres, but it was enough to give them their fourth straight win.

Mets 12, Yankees 7: Being in Yankee Stadium sure has cured the Mets’ offensive woes. Curtis Granderson hit a three-run homer in the first and Daniel Murphy hit one in the fifth. This game fell two minutes shy of four hours, so it was good an agonizing for masochistic Yankees fans, who now root for a .500 ballclub.

Brewers 5, Pirates 2: Gerrit Cole hit Carlos Gomez with a pitch in the third inning because of course he did. No ill-will sprung from it, however and everyone moved on. Gomez came around to score, so viva the unwritten rules. Cole sure showed Gomez. Marco Estrada didn’t have any grudges to deal with. All he did was win the game with six serviceable innings.

Blue Jays 5, Indians 4: R.A. Dickey won for the third time in four starts. Juan Francisco hit a homer. Melky Cabrera gunned the would-be tying run down at the plate in the eighth, but I suppose we’re not supposed to mention that because he tested positive for drugs a couple of years ago and now “questions have arisen” in bored and suspicious people’s minds.

Cardinals 4, Cubs 3: A 12th inning walkoff plunking, as Justin Grimm hit Greg Garcia with the bases loaded in the 12th of a 3-3 game. Rough inning for Grimm as he gave up a single and two walks to load the bases before the game-ender. Kinda deflating for Chicago, which had rallied off Trevor Rosenthal to tie it in the ninth.

Editor’s Note: Hardball Talk‘s partner FanDuel is hosting a one-day $18,000 Fantasy Baseball league for Wednesday night’s MLB games. It’s only $2 to join and first prize is $2,000. Starts at 7:07pm ET on WednesdayHere’s the FanDuel link.

Royals 5, Rockies 1: James Shields allowed one run over seven while striking out eight. One of those eight was his 1,500th career strikeout.

Diamondbacks 3, Nationals 1: “I have a Strasburg.” “Oh yeah, well we have an Arroyo.” I dunno, just trying to dramatic that all up. A one run complete game for Bronson Arroyo. A two-run double by Paul Goldschmidt in the fifth put Arizona up for good.

Twins 8, Red Sox 6: Two homers for David Ortiz but a walkoff homer for Chris Parmalee was better. Had to feel good for Parmalee, who has spent part of the season in the minors.

Dodgers 7, Marlins 1: Josh Beckett gets his first win since 2012 and it comes against his old team. Yasiel Puig had an RBI double and extended his hitting streak to 13 games. Miami has lost five in a row.

Braves 5, Giants 0: Mike Minor pitched shutout baseball into the seventh. Ryan Vogelsong  . . . didn’t. Two RBI for Freddie Freeman. The Braves’ three-run sixth was keyed by Jason Heyward who tagged up to take second base on one play and managed to duck under a tag at home to score even though the ball beat him there by ten feet.

Athletics 11, White Sox 0: Drew Pomeranz and three relievers combined on a four-hit shutout. Josh Reddick and Brandon Moss hit homers — two for Moss, actually. The A’s are tied for the most wins in baseball and lead everyone in baseball in run differential with a +73.

Rays 2, Mariners 1: As in the Orioles-Tigers game, a 1-0 lead wasn’t enough as Fernando Rodney blew the save by allowing all of the opponents’ runs in the ninth. That (and some pretty awesome pitching) allowed David Price to get the win. Price went the distance and struck out 12. Hisashi Iwakuma had eight shutout innings flushed down the toilet.

And That Happened: Wednesday’s scores and highlights

Julio Teheran

Braves 1, Phillies 0: Cliff Lee’s last start of 2013 came against the Braves. He pitched eight innings, allowed one solo homer but otherwise struck out 13 and looked invincible. And he lost. Last night: nine innings, one solo homer, but otherwise struck out 13 and looked invincible. And he lost. He totally dominates the Braves but runs into the worst luck run support-wise. Of course this time it had less to do with bad luck and more to do with Julio Teheran keeping Phillies hitters off balance all night. His first complete game and, by definition, his first shutout. Lee got the strikeouts, but Teheran walked one guy and allowed three singles and that was it.

More generally: some people may feel differently, but this is The Perfect Baseball Game. Not because the Braves won — that’s just a happy coincidence — but because of how freakin’ tight and perfectly pitched and tense it got as the game went on. Give me two guys working fast, throwing strikes, throwing confidently and throwing up zeroes like this all night. Give me the complete lack of calls to the bullpen. Give me tight defense and a ninth inning where one ball dropping in here or there or one swing of the bat could totally change things. A game where, until the 27th out is recorded, you couldn’t breathe. If this kind of game doesn’t grab you — or kill you, depending on which side your team falls — you and I don’t have a ton to talk about. Baseball doesn’t get better than this.

Yankees 3, Cubs 0; Yankees 2, Cubs 0: Shutout on both ends of the doubleheader. After watching this Ernie Banks probably said “Forget it! Playing two just ain’t worth it! I’m going out to get something to eat instead of watching any more of this atrocity. God, I should’ve just gone to the Whitney and checked out the Bellows exhibit rather than sit through two dispiriting shutouts.” So good going, 2014 Cubs, you went and made the most optimistic, most doubleheader-happy man in the history of baseball wish you had only played one game. At most. Well-played.

Reds 4, Pirates 0: Johnny Cueto was on point, setting his career high for strikeouts and tossing his third career shutout. Put me in mind of that April 2008 debut of his, which I surreptitiously watched with my friend Mark, who is a big Reds fan, while at my law office one fine afternoon. We watched that and thought Cueto was Bob Gibson all over again. He’s not, but when he’s on he’s really good.

Orioles 3, Rays 0: Yet another shutout. Specifically, Miguel Gonzalez and two relievers combined on a six-hitter. For years we’ve been saying “if the O’s get pitching, look out!” The’ve been getting pitching. As Boston stumbles and Tampa Bay and New York is smacked around by injuries. Hmmmm.

Indians 3, Tigers 2: Last year the Indians finished a game behind the Tigers. If they had dropped, say, only 13 of 19 to the Tigers instead of the 15 of 19 they did lose it obviously would’ve gone differently. They’re starting 2014 off on better footing, beating the Tigers on a night when Anibal Sanchez didn’t seem to have it together early and when Zach McAllilster did. Yan Gomes hot a two-run triple.

Nationals 6, Marlins 3: Down 3-0 in the top of the sixth, Jayson Werth hit a three-run homer which was subject to a review. Watch it here. It looks sorta like fan interference but it also looks like maybe it would hit above the wall even if the dorks didn’t reach out to grab it. I dunno, it’s the Nats and Marlins. When they’re fighting for second place, several games back of the Braves all year, we can revisit its significance, right? Regardless, if Jarrod Saltalamacchia doesn’t commit two — not one, but two — errors that inning, it’s all academic anyway. Jose Fernandez (7 IP, 4 H, 0 ER, 10K, 0 BB) deserved better.

Mets 5, Diamondbacks 2: The Mets sweep. Dillon Gee allowed three hits in seven scoreless innings. That’s six straight losses for the Dbacks. Not sure what they do now. They’ve traded away all their non-gritty players, fired pitching coach Charles Nagy last year and it’s doubtful that throwing balls at guys is a sound strategy. They’re the worst team in baseball at the moment.

Brewers 5, Cardinals 1: Wily Peralta allowed one run in six and a third as the Brew Crew avoids the sweep. Ron Roenicke after the game:

“What’s really important — most important — is we lost two games to begin the series and we got that game back. It’s important against our division, but we have to win more games than they do. It’s not head to head. We have to win more games this season then they do. That’s what we’re playing for.”

Great, now what is the equipment manager supposed to do with all of these swimsuits and pianos the Brewers were going to use in the later rounds of the pageant?

Editor’s Note: Hardball Talk‘s partner FanDuel is hosting a one-day $40,000 Fantasy Baseball league for Thursday evening MLB games. It’s $25 to join and first prize is $6,000. Starts at 7:05pm ET on ThursdayHere’s the FanDuel link.

Rangers 3, Mariners 2: I spend all morning yesterday talking up Darvish vs. Hernandez and neither figures in the decision. Each pitched well — one run for Hernandez over seven, two over seven for Darvish — but the game turned on Fernando Rodney blowing up in the ninth, throwing a run-scoring wild pitch and allowing a walkoff single to Leonys Martin. Which, to be honest, may have been something I could’ve predicted when I was talking up Hernandez and Darvish yesterday morning.

Giants 2, Dodgers 1: Pablo Sandoval hit a junk pitch with an awkward swing into center field to score the go-ahead and ultimately winning run in the seventh. Baseball doesn’t have to always be pretty.

Angels 5, Athletics 4: Chris Iannetta with a walkoff homer in the 12th. You’ll be shocked to hear that, after the game, Iannetta said he “was just looking for a pitch to hit.” The A’s blew a bunch of chances to take the lead in extras but the Angels’ pen stranded their runners left and right.

Royals 6, Astros 4: Mike Moustakas, who has struggled mightily out of the gate, hit solo homer to give the Royals the lead in the 11th. George Springer had a hit and a walk in his big league debut.

Padres 4, Rockies 2: Andrew Cashner allowed one earned run while pitching into the eighth and striking out five. It was the 10th straight start in which he gave up two runs or fewer.

Red Sox 6, White Sox 4: The polar opposite of that Braves-Phillies game. Robin Ventura used four pitchers to get through the eighth inning and thus had to use infielder Leury Garcia to pitch the 14th inning of a tie game. Jackie Bradley Jr. hit a two-run double off him for what proved to be the winning runs. Matthew has an extended recap of this one, including some fun scoring decisions and box score oddities.

Blue Jays vs. Twins: POSTPONED: “I think it’s dark and it looks like rain,” you said, “and the wind is blowing like it’s the end of the
world,” you said “and it’s so cold it’s like the cold if you were dead,” and then you smiled for a second.

2014 Preview: Seattle Mariners

Robinson Cano

Between now and Opening Day, HardballTalk will take a look at each of baseball’s 30 teams, asking the key questions, the not-so-key questions, and generally breaking down their chances for the 2014 season. Next up: The Seattle Mariners.

The Big Question: Robinson Cano and . . . then what?

The Mariners certainly made the biggest splash of the offseason in signing Robinson Cano to a ten-year, $240 million deal. Unlike a lot of teams, a big signing like this may have been necessary for credibility purposes, as the book on Seattle for years has been that no elite offensive free agents wanted to go there. But no matter how significant the signing was, one player is not a plan. It’s merely a start. Do the Mariners have a plan?

If they have one, it’s hard to see based on their non-Cano moves. Corey Hart missed all of last season. Logan Morrison has yet to live up to expectations. Justin Smoak is still around. As of a week ago there is still talk of a Kendrys Morales reunion. Maybe there is some sport where a bunch of mostly immobile 1B/DH types are the ingredients of a championship recipe, but it’s certainly not post Steroid-Era major league baseball.

Not that the Mariners had to do it all at once. They’ve been a pretty bad team for awhile and it will take some time to get better. But they don’t have unlimited time. Robinson Cano can be expected to be an elite, team-leading offensive talent for a couple more years, but as he gets into the second half of that ten-year deal, he’s going to be a role player at best. There is a window in Seattle. It could stay open for five years, but it’s way more likely to last two or three, and in that time the Mariners have to get some useful pieces around their $240 million man.

Right now it’s Cano, Kyle Seager, Michael Saunders and, I dunno, Brad Miller? Maybe Hart and Morrison exceed expectations. That could all make for some improvement. But they just don’t have the firepower yet. They need to do more than pay a quarter billion to a guy and hope for the best.

What else is going on?

  • There’s reason to like this pitching staff, assuming it can all get healthy. Felix Hernandez is Felix Hernandez and Hisashi Iwakuma and Taijuan Walker should be pretty darn good, but the latter two of those gents are going to start the season on the disabled list. If they return quickly, yes, this is a rotation that plays. If they don’t, Scott Baker is a the number two starter and it goes downhill from there. UPDATE: sorry, wrote this before Scott Baker was released. Still, point stands: if Walker and Iwakuma are hurt, the rotation after Hernandez is in trouble.
  • Another big pickup was Fernando Rodney. Not a bad pickup, but he was definitely a different dude in 2013 than he was in 2012. He has to throw more strikes this year to justify the pickup. Danny Farquhar and Charlie Furbush are pretty solid setup men, though, and Yoervis Medina can strike dudes out. This could be a pretty good bullpen assuming that an Iwakuma and Walker-free rotation don’t burn them out early.
  • There’s a new manager in town: Lloyd McClendon. It’ll be interesting to see the sort of tone he sets in the early going. Back when he managed the Pirates he didn’t do much to impress anyone, even once you adjusted for the bad teams he was given. After several years at Jim Leyland’s knee in Detroit, however, McClendon has spent this spring sticking up for his players with a quickness and seeming very comfortable dealing with the press and the day-to-day with an easygoing aplomb. Maybe things will be different the second time around.

Prediction: Cano is nice, but it’s gonna take more. Fourth place, American League West.