Tag: Evan Longoria

Carlos Gomez

Carlos Gomez is one of the dozen best players in baseball


I was looking up some of Brewers center fielder Carlos Gomez’s numbers today, basically just to make myself sad as a Twins fan frustrated by his becoming another player to thrive after leaving Minnesota. I then tweeted about how good Gomez has been, calling him one of the dozen best players in baseball, and I was surprised by how many replies I got acting like that was a ridiculous notion.

It’s not.

Look at how he’s developed as a hitter during the past three seasons:

2012: .260 batting average, 19 homers, 42 total extra-base hits, 37 steals, .768 OPS in 137 games.

2013: .284 batting average, 24 homers, 61 total extra-base hits, 40 steals, .843 OPS in 147 games.

2014: .317 batting average, 11 homers, 27 total extra-base hits, 9 steals, .974 OPS in 47 games.

Add it all up and during that two-and-a-half year span Gomez has hit .281 with 54 homers, 60 doubles, 16 triples, 86 stolen bases, and an .838 OPS in 331 games. Among the hitters with a lower OPS during that span: Evan Longoria, Nelson Cruz, Bryce Harper, Albert Pujols, Ryan Zimmerman, Allen Craig, Carlos Beltran, Mike Napoli, Justin Upton, Adam Jones, Adrian Gonzalez, Alex Rios, Jay Bruce.

Oh, and Gomez is a Gold Glove center fielder too.

Wins Above Replacement attempts to measure a player’s offensive, defensive, and baserunning contributions and dating back to 2012 he has the eighth-highest WAR total in all of baseball among position players. It’s fine to be surprised by how good Gomez has been lately, but at this point the only reason “he’s one of the dozen best players in baseball” might be mockable is that it undersells just how good he’s become at age 28.

And trust me, as a Minnesotan it pains me a great deal to say that.

Settling the Score: Friday’s results

Jose Abreu

They said White Sox first baseman Jose Abreu would hit some home runs, but few expected him to show this much power this soon. Abreu blasted two home runs on Friday night against the Rays, including a walk-off grand slam in the bottom of the ninth. Abreu’s nine home runs breaks the record for long balls hit by rookies in the month of April. The previous record was eight, most recently set by Albert Pujols in April 2001 and previously held by Carlos Delgado and Kent Hrbek. Abreu’s 27 RBI in the month also ties a record, set by Pujols, for April runs batted in by a rookie.

Oh, and Abreu is tied for the MLB lead in home runs with Pujols at nine, and is also tied for the MLB lead in RBI with Giancarlo Stanton and Chris Colabello at 27.

Abreu got the scoring started for the White Sox in the first inning, driving an RBI single to center to put his team up 1-0 against Rays starter Chris Archer. The Rays stormed back for four runs in the top of the second inning, chasing Sox starter Erik Johnson after 1 2/3 innings.

Abreu brought the score to 4-2 in the third inning with a solo home run to straightaway center field, and the White Sox knotted things up at 4-4 when Tyler Flowers knocked in two runs with a single in the fourth.

The game remained tied at four apiece entering the top of the ninth, but Evan Longoria gave his team the lead with a two-run home run off of Matt Lindstrom to make it 6-4. In the bottom half of the ninth, the White Sox loaded the bases with one out against Rays reliever Grant Balfour when Alejandro De Aza doubled, and Tyler Flowers and Paul Konerko drew walks. However, their chances of walking off took a hit when Adam Eaton could only push across one run, grounding into a fielder’s choice at second base for the second out of the inning. The only thing that did was set up Abreu to become the hero. The White Sox needed one run to tie and two to win. With the count 0-1, Balfour threw a fastball on the outer edge of the strike zone, but Abreu drove it to right-center over the head of right fielder Wil Myers and over the fence for the walk-off grand slam, giving the White Sox the 9-6 victory.

The win pushes the White Sox to .500 at 12-12. They have hovered around .500 all season and sit two games behind the first-place Tigers in a three-way tie for second place along with the Twins and Royals.

Your Friday box scores:

Rays 6, White Sox 9

Royals 5, Orioles 0

Padres 1, Nationals 11

Angels 13, Yankees 1

Marlins 3, Mets 4

Red Sox 8, Blue Jays 1

Reds 4, Braves 5

Cubs 2, Brewers 5

Tigers 10, Twins 6

Pirates 0, Cardinals 1

Athletics 12, Astros 5

Phillies 4, Diamondbacks 5

Rangers 5, Mariners 6

Rockies 5, Dodgers 4

Indians 1, Giants 5

Evan Longoria becomes Rays franchise leader with 164th career home run

New York Yankees v Tampa Bay Rays

Evan Longoria is already on a lot of top-ten leaderboards for the Rays. The franchise came into existence in 1998, so it’s not nearly as impressive as a top-ten appearance on Red Sox leaderboards. At any rate, Longoria figures to be the guy everybody chases by the time he hangs up his spikes.

With a third inning, two-run blast off of Ivan Nova on Saturday night, Longoria broke a tie with Carlos Pena to become the Rays’ franchise leader in career home runs with 164.

The Rays’ top-ten for home runs:

Rank Player HR
1 Evan Longoria 164
2 Carlos Pena 163
3 Aubrey Huff 128
4 B.J. Upton 118
5 Ben Zobrist 107
6 Carl Crawford 104
7 Fred McGriff 99
8 Matthew Joyce 69
9 Jonny Gomes 66
10 Greg Vaughn 60

Cesar Cabral designated for assignment by Yankees after rough night on the mound

Cesar Cabral AP

Yankees left-hander Cesar Cabral had an eventful Friday night. And not in a good way.

Cabral faced six batters in the bottom of the eighth inning against the Rays last night and failed to retire any of them. After replacing Adam Warren, he gave up a single to Ben Zobrist before throwing a wild pitch and giving up an RBI single to Brandon Guyer. He then Evan Longoria and James Loney before serving up a two-run single to Wil Myers. Finally, he hit Logan Forsythe in the back with a pitch before being ejected by home plate umpire Joe West. Yes, he hit three batters in one inning.

Yankees manager Joe Girardi came out to defend his player, which makes sense since it was clear Cabral wasn’t throwing at anybody intentionally. But he was all over the place and could have hurt someone if he was allowed to continue. The Yankees ended up having to use Shawn Kelley despite being down six runs, so you can understand Girardi’s frustration with the situation, but West did the right thing here.

If Cabral’s performance and ejection wasn’t bad enough, he was designated for assignment by the Yankees after the game. Matt Daley, a 31-year-old right-hander, has been called up to take his place on the active roster.

The Astros are calling up George Springer

George Springer

I wasn’t expecting this until June, maybe, but the Astros are going with the smart baseball decision over the smart financial decision. From Mark Berman at Fox26 Houston:

Major League Baseball sources told FOX 26 Sports the Houston Astros will call up outfielder George Springer from Triple-A Oklahoma City on Wednesday.

Springer went 3-4 with a grand slam and four RBIs in the RedHawks 11-9 win in Colorado Springs Tuesday night. He is hitting .353 this season with three home runs and nine RBIs. Last season Springer hit .303 with 37 home runs and 108 RBIs while splitting time between Double-A Corpus Christi and Triple-A Oklahoma City.

He’s clearly ready for the majors. And maybe would’ve been there already, but the Astros seemed determined to use his time in the minors as a way to leverage him into accepting a seven-year, $23 million contract. Which, however cool that might be for a guy at least three years from a significant payday, would seriously undervalue him if he even comes close to fulfilling his potential. A gamble for Springer, sure, but given where salaries are these days, him getting less than $4 million a year as he goes through arbitration would be almost comically cheap.

It’ll be interesting to see if the sides do reach a long-term agreement soon after his callup, the way the Rays and Evan Longoria did when he finally reached the majors back in 2008. If so, it’ll add some credence to the notion that the Astros made Springer’s callup contingent on his accepting a long term deal. If not, it means that Springer called the Astros’ bluff and basically forced them to call him up via his fantastic play.