Tag: DJ LeMahieu


2015 All-Star Game Preview



CINCINNATI — All of the parties, the Derbys the parades and the baloney is out of the way. Now it’s time for the actual All-Star Game.

Well, not quite yet. This evening there will still be a lot of . . . stuff. Pete Rose will make an appearance on the field here at Great American Ballpark, and I predict his ovation will be louder than even that given to Todd Frazier last night.

Also, the four “Greatest Living Ballplayers” and the “Franchise Four” of each team — all of which were voted on by fans — will be announced prior to the game. One of those Greatest Living Ballplayers is set to throw out the first pitch. That should create some controversy and argument fodder over the next couple of baseball-free days.

The U.S. Navy will conduct a flyover featuring four FA-18 Super Hornets. They practiced here yesterday. They’re loud. Not quite as loud, but definitely amplified will be Ciara, who will sing the U.S. National Anthem and Leo Welsh who will perform the Canadian Anthem. Country singer Josh Turner will sing “God Bless America.”

But then there is a game. Here’s what you need to know:

First Pitch: 8:15PM
Channel: FOX

American League Lineup

1. Mike Trout, CF, Angels
2. Josh Donaldson, 3B, Blue Jays
3. Albert Pujols, 1B, Angels
4. Nelson Cruz, DH, Mariners
5. Lorenzo Cain, RF, Royals
6. Adam Jones, LF, Orioles
7. Salvador Perez, C, Royals
8. Jose Altuve, 2B, Astros
9. Alcides Escobar, SS, Royals
Dallas Keuchel, SP, Astros

Notes: Quite a familiar AL group. Nelson Cruz, Josh Donaldson, Sal Perez, Mike Trout and Adam Jones all started last year, and many of them are on their third or fourth go-around. Missing is Alex Gordon and there is also no Miguel Cabrera due to injuries. Chris Sale may only be available in an emergency. Sonny Gray is unavailable due to pitching on Sunday.

National League Lineup

1. Andrew McCutchen, CF, Pirates
2. Todd Frazier, 3B, Reds
3. Bryce Harper, RF, Nationals
4. Paul Goldschmidt, 1B, Diamondbacks
5. Buster Posey, C, Giants
6. Anthony Rizzo, DH, Cubs
7. Jhonny Peralta, SS, Cardinals
8. Joc Pederson, LF, Dodgers
9. DJ LeMahieu, 2B, Rockies
Zack Greinke, SP, Dodgers

Notes: Joc Pederson is filling in for the injured Matt Holliday. No Giancarlo Stanton or Dee Gordon for the same reasons. Max Scherzer pitched on Sunday or else you figure he’d get the start. Otherwise it’s McCutchen and Goldschmidt and a lot of guys who haven’t been here much. At least as starters. There’s a lot of experience here from guys who were reserves in the past.

  • All of the reserves and pitchers — plus and minus a few substitutions — can be seen here.

As for a prediction? Well, these things are total crapshoots. I think Ned Yost constructed a more real life roster with middle relievers and utility guys in places, whereas Bruce Bochy has more starters and veterans. But if that is an advantage to Yost, it’s probably made up for by the fact that Bochy is the better manager.

Ultimately, however, this is the most unpredictable game played all year because it’s almost entirely not a game as we tend to understand baseball. But hey, at least it doesn’t count for anything important, right?

Oh, wait. It does. Something that has, historically, mattered a whole lot. As in,since 1985, the team with home-field advantage has won 23 of 29 World Series. And until the Giants beat the Royals on the road in Game Seven last year, the home team had won nine straight World Series Game Sevens.

Play ball?

2014 Gold Glove winners

gold glove award 2013

The 2014 Rawlings Gold Glove Award recipients are being revealed during an hour-long special airing right now (7:00 p.m. ET) on ESPN2. We will list all of the winners here, position-by-position, as they are announced by the Baseball Tonight crew …

National League

C Yadier Molina, Cardinals
1B Adrian Gonzalez, Dodgers
2B DJ LeMahieu, Rockies
3B Nolan Arenado, Rockies
SS Andrelton Simmons, Braves
LF Christian Yelich, Marlins
CF Juan Lagares, Mets
RF Jason Heyward, Braves
P Zack Greinke, Dodgers

American League

C Salvador Perez, Royals
1B Eric Hosmer, Royals
2B Dustin Pedroia, Red Sox
3B Kyle Seager, Mariners
SS J.J. Hardy, Orioles
LF Alex Gordon, Royals
CF Adam Jones, Orioles
RF Nick Markakis, Orioles
P Dallas Keuchel, Astros

Gold Glove Awards are voted on by the managers and coaches in each league. A sabermetric component was added in 2013, providing a statistical research guide from the Society for American Baseball Research (SABR) to the voters, but there are obviously still deep flaws. Leave some outrage in the comments if you’d like.

2014 Preview: Colorado Rockies

Troy Tulowitzki Getty

Between now and Opening Day, HardballTalk will take a look at each of baseball’s 30 teams, asking the key questions, the not-so-key questions, and generally breaking down their chances for the 2014 season. Next up: The Colorado Rockies.

The Big Question: Can the Rockies get back over the .500 mark?

Rookie manager Walt Weiss led the Rockies to a 10-win improvement (64 wins to 74 wins) last year, but it wasn’t good enough to prevent the club from a second straight last-place finish in the National League West. After abandoning their four-man rotation experiment, the starting pitching was better with Jhoulys Chacin and Jorge De La Rosa healthy and Tyler Chatwood surprising, but the pitching on the whole was still far from good. Meanwhile, the offense couldn’t do enough to make up for it. In fact, the Rockies scored their fewest runs in franchise history last year, not including the strike-shortened season in 1994.

With Troy Tulowitzki and Carlos Gonzalez, the Rockies have two of the best players in the game, but we saw once again last season that it’s difficult to rely on either of them to stay healthy. Colorado was actually five games over .500 as late as June 11, but injuries to Tulowitzki and Gonzalez soon followed and the club predictably struggled as the year moved along. Michael Cuddyer won the NL batting crown last season and Wilin Rosario continued to show why he’s one of the best power-hitting catchers in the game, but ideally they’ll be complementary pieces to Tulowitzki and Gonzalez this year, not trying to carry the load for the offense.

The Rockies fell short in their efforts to land Jose Abreu, Brian McCann, or Carlos Ruiz over the winter, but they still did quite a bit of tinkering. While the Dexter Fowler trade with Houston was a head-scratcher, they used the cost savings to sign Justin Morneau to help replace the retired Todd Helton at first base. They invested a lot of money into the back end of their bullpen with the additions of LaTroy Hawkins and Boone Logan. They also bought low in trades for the injury-plagued Brett Anderson and the free-swinging Drew Stubbs and even brought Franklin Morales back into the fold.

The Rockies don’t look like a contender at first blush, but their activity over the winter suggests that the front office thinks they can be. For a chance at .500 or better, my guess is they’d need 140-plus games out of both Tulowitzki and Gonzalez and for Anderson to stay healthy enough to rediscover some of his early promise. It’s a tough sell. They could take a step back from 2013 if Chacin’s shoulder issue continues.

What else is going on?  

  • After saying for most of the offseason that Carlos Gonzalez would replace the departed Fowler as the starting center fielder, the Rockies recently changed course by deciding that he’ll remain in left field. It’s the right move, as he has a better chance to hold up there, especially coming off a nagging finger injury. Drew Stubbs and Charlie Blackmon now figure to get most of the playing time in center field while Corey Dickerson could find himself in Triple-A to begin the year.
  • Nolan Arenado didn’t make his major league debut until April 28 last year, but he ended up becoming the first rookie to win the Gold Glove Award at third base since 1957. While we know he can pick it at the hot corner, his bat remains a work in progress, as he hit .267/.301/.405 with 10 home runs and an 82 OPS+ in 113 games last season. He doesn’t turn 23 until April and Coors Field is a pretty good environment to facilitate a power progression, so the Rockies are hoping for him to take the next step in 2014.
  • The Rockies raised some eyebrows over the winter when they signed LaTroy Hawkins to a one-year, $2.25 million deal with the idea of using the veteran reliever as their closer in 2014. While this could be a way to keep Rex Brothers’ salary down in arbitration, the odds are against the 41-year-old Hawkins keeping the job for long. Look for the Rockies to give in to Brothers eventually or potentially test Chad Bettis at some point.
  • What will the Rockies get out of second base? Josh Rutledge was supposed to be the guy last year, but he struggled on both sides of the ball and even found himself demoted to Triple-A for a stretch. DJ LeMahieu benefited from Rutledge’s struggles and ended up logging 434 plate appearances. While he was a solid defender and showed a knack for making contact, he could only muster a .673 OPS (75 OPS+). LeMahieu should be the favorite to begin the season as the starting second baseman, but that could change quickly depending on how Rutledge swings the bat.
  • The Rockies have some questions in the back end of their rotation, but there’s help on the way with right-handers Eddie Butler and Jon Gray, who are arguably the best tandem of pitching prospects in the game right now. Butler is likely to arrive sooner, possibly by July if all goes well. It’s tough to say what sort of impact pitching in Coors Field will have on them, but there’s some hope in the pipeline. And that’s something.

Prediction: The Rockies could be an interesting team if things break right, but you could say the same thing for a lot of teams. As it stands, there are too many questions here. Fifth place, NL West.

And That Happened: Tuesday’s scores and highlights

Miami Marlins v Atlanta Braves

Braves 4, Marlins 3: The Braves clinch a playoff berth on a Freddie Freeman walkoff jack. It only guarantees them a slot in the one-game gimmicky thing next Friday, but that beats the hell out of last September. The only thing that would have made this better is if Heath Bell, as the the Marlins walked to the clubhouse, went up to Ozzie Guillen and told him that he wouldn’t have blown the save if Ozzie wasn’t such a jerk and kept him from closing.

Tigers 3, Royals 0: Anibal Sanchez comes up big, tossing a three-hit, ten-strikeout shutout, and the Tigers take advantage of an earlier White Sox loss for the first time in what seems like forever. Things are all tied up in the AL Central.

Indians 4, White Sox 3: Tied up because the Sox’ 9th inning rally off Chris Perez, though quite promising for a while, fell short. Russ Canzler had a big day. Meaningless but fun: Canzler has played two games against Chicago this year and he is 4 for 8 with two homers and a double and three driven in.

Phillies 6, Nationals 3: A four game lead with eight to go is pretty safe, but really Washington, you don’t want to be doin’ this. Not that I’m gonna stop you from doin’ this, but dudes, seriously. Not the best night ever for Cole Hamels, but he won his 16th, which sets a new high for him.

Reds 4, Brewers 2: This series could be the Brewers’ Waterloo. And I’m not talking about the one on Highway 89 northeast of Madison.  The loss, combined with the Cardinals win drops them four and a half back in the wild card.

Cardinals 4, Astros 0: About that Cardinals win: Jaime Garcia tossed seven shutout innings. I haven’t checked it, but I bet — win or lose — the Astros have had the most impact on the NL playoff race this year. Be it knocking off the Phillies or laying down to the contenders, the Astros have paid a rich and meaningful role in the pennant race.

Blue Jays 4, Orioles 0: Another classic six-pitcher shutout. Viva September. Aaron Laffey led the way with five innings of goose eggs.

Twins 5, Yankees 4: I guess Denard Span wasn’t lying when he told Adam Jones he was trying to help the O’s the best he can. Span drove in two and the Yankees can’t put any more daylight between themselves and the Orioles. The gap remains one and a half.

Angels 5, Mariners 4: Angels pitchers strike out 20 M’s batters — Greinke fanned 13 in five innings himself — and hold on for a 5-4 victory. Justin Smoak had two bombs in a losing effort. Losing team effort, anyway. His effort was smashing, baby.

Rays 5, Red Sox 2: David Price continues to be a beast. He notches his 19th win while striking out 13 Red Sox. Jeff Keppinger’s second inning three-run shot was all the Rays needed.

Pirates 10, Mets 6: At least Pittsburgh managed to avoid being mathematically eliminated for an extra night. Which is something. Approximately 236 players were used in this game.

Rockies 10, Cubs 5:  DJ LeMahieu singled, doubled and tripled but had his shot at the cycle cut short due to rain, as this one was called after six and a half innings. Stinks for him, but ending a late-season Cubs-Rockies game early is a positive in humanitarian terms. Indeed, I view the rain as evidence that God loves us and wants us to be happy.

Diamondbacks 7, Giants 2: Paul Goldschmidt homered and drove in five. Tim Lincecum had been on track but then pinches off a Seven run on five hit four inning performance heading into the playoffs. Troublesome.

Padres 2, Giants 1: Edinson Volquez had seven shutout innings as the Dodgers continue to sink.

Athletics 3, Rangers 2: George Kottaras hit a leadoff homer in the 10th inning. He hit it off Mark Lowe who, for reasons which are clear only to Ron Washington, was pitching in a tied game in the 10th inning. This is the sort of magic that folks point to when they say that Washington, however good a manager he is over the long haul, costs his team individual games.

Rockies trade Stewart, Weathers to Cubs for Colvin, LeMahieu

ian stewart getty bigger

According to Troy Renck of the Denver Post, the Rockies have traded third baseman Ian Stewart and right-hander Casey Weathers to the Cubs for outfielder Tyler Colvin and infielder DJ LeMahieu.

It’s probably not the big splash that Cubs fans had been hoping for out of the new Theo Epstein-led regime, but it’s a nice low-risk swap capable of paying dividends if things bounce right.

Stewart posted a miserable .156/.243/.221 batting line with zero home runs and six RBI in 136 plate appearances this past year for Colorado. But the 26-year-old has a .913 career OPS at the Triple-A level and mashed 25 home runs as a major leaguer in 2009.

Stewart also has good hands and decent range at the hot corner.

Weathers is basically a throw-in. The former first-round pick had a 5.32 ERA and 48/48 K/BB ratio in 45 2/3 innings this year at Double-A. Already 26 years old, he appears unlikely to ever realize his full potential.

As for Colorado’s haul: Colvin slugged 20 home runs alongside an .816 OPS in 2010 as a rookie before taking a large step back in his sophomore campaign. The Rockies will hope that the thin air at Coors Field can rejuvenate his power numbers. LeMahieu made his big league debut in 2011 at the age of 23 and boasts a .317 career minor-league batting average. He could see some playing time at second base in 2012.