Tag: David Wright

David Wright Getty

Hamstring injury puts David Wright on Mets’ disabled list


David Wright exited Tuesday night’s game after straining his hamstring on a stolen base attempt and now the Mets have placed the seven-time All-Star third baseman on the disabled list.

Wright was off to a nice start following a career-worst, injury wrecked 2014 season, but he’ll be out for at least the rest of the month and the Mets’ options to replace him at third base include Eric Campbell and Ruben Tejada.

Wright has played more than 135 games in a season just once since 2011 and his missing 28 games last season actually understates his health issues, because he played through shoulder problems while hitting just .269 with eight homers and a .698 OPS.

Campbell, who was called up from Triple-A to replace Wright on the roster, hit .263 with three homers and a .680 OPS in 85 games for the Mets as a 27-year-old rookie last season. He’s also a career .335 hitter with a .956 OPS in 159 games at Triple-A, albeit in a very hitter-friendly environment.

And That Happened: Tuesday’s scores and highlights

Blake Treinen

Red Sox 8, Nationals 7: Stop me if you’ve heard this one: the Nationals defense stunk and was a big reason they lost the game. Indeed, the Sox scored three runs in the seventh inning with the aid of zero (0) hits. How? Like this: Hanley Ramirez reached first base on yet another Ian Desmond error. Then Matt Thronton hit Shane Victorino. Ramirez went to third on a flyout, Thornton then hit Allen Craig to load the bases (the Nats have hit a LOT of Red Sox this series). Enter reliever Blake Treinen who fielded a Ryan Hanigan comebacker, dropped it, allowing Ramirez to score then threw it pas the catcher which allowed Victorino to score. Craig then came in with the go-ahead run on groundout.

The Nationals are still the most talented team in the NL East. It’d be folly to not say they’ll still win the division after a mere week or so’s worth of play. Yet they are 2-6, in last place in the division and have earned that spot by playing, perhaps, the worst baseball of anyone in the league so far. That’s pretty darn special.

Orioles 4, Yankees 3: Miguel Gonzalez struck out ten. Adam Jones homered and hit a sac fly. Postgame quote from Gonzalez: “Against the Yankees, you can’t give in. Every pitch has to be a quality pitch.” If I was there I’d be seriously inclined to ask “Which teams can you give in to? To whom can you throw junk pitches?” Then they’d take my press pass away and throw me the hell out, I assume. Be totally worth it.

Tigers 2, Pirates 0: Shane Greene is helping the Tigers not miss Max Scherzer, Rick Porcello or the injured Justin Verlander. Here he tossed eight shutout innings. This follows his season debut in which he allowed only an unearned run in eight innings against the Twins.

Rays 3, Blue Jays 2: Steven Souza had a homer that went a mile — officially 463 feet — and then later reached on a bunt single — unoffically 15 feet — and came around to score the go-ahead run. Souza on his homer: “It’s fun when it goes like that. Have you ever cut butter with a knife? That’s what it feels like.” I’m pretty sure Rabbit Angstrom said that to his priest on the golf course in “Rabbit Run.”

White Sox 4, Indians 1: Carlos Carrasco was struck in the face by a line drive in the first inning but thankfully only got a bruised jaw out of it. It did put the bullpen in the game early, however, the White Sox scored two early and that was that. I think the Indians will take that, though, given how much worse the evening could’ve gone.

Marlins 8, Braves 2: It wasn’t like Giancarlo Stanton was gonna hit .130 all year, right? Here he went 3-for-3, doubled, walked twice and drove in four. Also: in his last at bat he didn’t wear his new face guard. The AP recaps didn’t say why. I’ll check out the Miami news later this morning to see if he explained it. Either way, one of his doubles came sans face guard.

Mets 6, Phillies 5: Matt Harvey Day and a win, but Matt Harvey was mortal — giving up three runs on five hits in six innings — and the Mets suffered multiple injuries. David Wright went out with a pulled hamstring which is likely to lay him up for a while. Michael Cuddyer left with a bruised hand, though he’ll likely play today. Chase Utley homered twice in a winning effort in a losing cause. Daniel Murphy hit a homer over the newly moved-in right field wall.

Rangers 8, Angels 2: Robinson Chirinos, the ninth place hitter, drove in five runs on a three-run homer and a two-run double. The double was aided by a miscommunication between Mike Trout and Matt Joyce, but it still counts because those are the rules. Nick Martinez allowed only a single unearned run in seven innings of work.

Reds 3, Cubs 2: Anthony DeSclafani threw seven scoreless innings and Joey Votto had two hits and an RBI to help the Reds stop a three-game losing streak. The pen bent but didn’t break in the eighth and ninth. Which is sort of novel for the Reds so far this year. The not breaking part, I mean.

Athletics 4, Astros 0: Rookie Kendall Graveman and four A’s relievers combined on the shutout. Billy Butler had an RBI double, giving him a hit in every game this year.

Dodgers 6, Mariners 5: Another walkoff win for the Dodgers, this time via a Howie Kendrick two-run double. The rally came off Fernando Rodney, who has allowed six runs in his last two outings. Nelson Cruz homered for the fourth straight game and Robinson Cano hit his first homer of the season.

Padres 5, Diamondbacks 1: Odrisamer Despaigne, who’s got more junk than Fred Sanford’s driveway, allowed one run over seven innings. Dude throws stuff in the 60s and the 90s. If I had him on my team I’d slot him the day after my hardest throwing starter and enjoy the chaos.

Rockies 4, Giants 1: Six pitchers — and some amazing defense — combined on this one for Colorado. The Rockies are 5-0 on the road this year, as everyone assumed they’d be. Among the web gems: a Nolan Arenado diving catch over the tarp and then a Charlie Blackmon play in which he chased down a deep fly at the fence to rob Buster Posey of a hit, both in the same inning. We’ll do separate posts about those here at HBT shortly.

David Wright departs game with pulled right hamstring

david wright getty

The injury bug has again bitten David Wright.

According to beat writer Jared Diamond of the Wall Street Journal, the veteran third baseman had to be removed from Tuesday night’s game against the Phillies after pulling his right hamstring on a stolen base attempt in the bottom of the eighth inning.

The Mets were out of infielders on their bench, so backup catcher Anthony Recker had to handle the hot corner in the top of the ninth. New York wound up beating the visiting Phillies 6-5 in a game started by Matt Harvey.

Wright is almost certainly going to be placed on the 15-day disabled list. The 32-year-old was limited to 134 games in 2014 and batted just .269 with a career-worst .698 OPS. He appeared in only 112 games in 2013.

There wasn’t much optimism about the injury in the postgame clubhouse …

Fred Wilpon did not talk to the media yesterday and the media is quite perturbed at this

Fred Wilpon

source: AP

Yesterday Mets owner Fred Wilpon held a closed-door meeting with his team. Then he opened the door and left and did not answer reporters’ questions about what was said behind closed doors. If I was Wilpon I’d probably say something like “well, the reason the doors were closed in that meeting was because what was said was not for public consumption,” but you can’t fault him for not doing that. I mean, that’s implied, right?

Apparently not clearly enough, because this morning at least three columns were written about Wilpon not talking to the media about what he said to his employees in a private conversation.

Bergen Record:

By all accounts this was a terrific meeting. Without going into specifics, David Wright said, “Fred has always been upbeat.” Terry Collins said it was “very, very impactful.” There were no threats, no win-or-else edicts issued. Wilpon played his hand to perfection, at least until the meeting ended and he strolled by a group of reporters.

That’s when Wilpon blew off a chance to deliver a state-of-the-team address. Instead of stopping, even for a few moments, to pump up the fan base, Wilpon walked right by. Not a word, not a gesture, no eye contact. Just feigned oblivion.


Fred Wilpon had plenty to say Monday at Tradition Field, where the Mets’ principal owner has been more visible this year than during any other spring training in recent memory . . . In fact, Wilpon has spoken to just about everyone during the past six weeks, with one notable exception.


And that’s not right.

Daily News:

Anyone who has reported on the Mets since 2011 knows the Fred Wilpon blowoff . . . The Mets beat writers received what I’m assured was a very polite version of this on Monday morning in Port St. Lucie, after he addressed the team (the Mets resist the notion that Wilpon “blew off” the media when he cruised by, and say that he simply didn’t wish to speak about a private meeting).

All of these columns were couched in terms of “hey, Wilpon is not speaking to you, the fans!” But I truly question if any Mets fans exist who actually care and/or believe what Fred Wilpon says after all of these years. They’d sooner punch him in the face, I suspect, than hang on his every word. Unless they did so in order to loudly declare why each of those words was a damn hurtful lie.

But maybe some Mets fan, somewhere really would feel better if Wilpon told him that the Mets were going to be OK. I’m not sure I want to meet such a strange, gullible person, but they may actually exist. And if they do I suppose I will grant that this is a legitimate complaint rather than the latest instance of late spring training media complaining.

2015 Preview: New York Mets

Matt Harvey

Between now and Opening Day, HardballTalk will take a look at each of baseball’s 30 teams, asking the key questions, the not-so-key questions, and generally breaking down their chances for the 2015 season. Next up: The New York Mets.

The Big Question: Can the Mets end years of futility to contend for the NL Wild Card in 2015?

The Mets’ fortunes in 2015 will rest in the hands of one person: Matt Harvey. All eyes will be on the soon-to-be 26-year-old right-hander as he returns to the starting rotation after missing all of the 2014 season due to Tommy John surgery. Harvey set the baseball world on fire in 2013, finishing with a 2.27 ERA and a 191/31 K/BB ratio in 178 1/3 innings, earning him a fourth-place finish in NL Cy Young balloting. If he can return to his former elite level, the Mets will be in good shape to make some noise in the NL East, a few laps behind the Washington Nationals.

Despite a quiet offseason, the Mets are arguably a contender for the NL Wild Card this season and they’re the most competitive they’ve been since 2008, having averaged fewer than 76 wins over the last six seasons. Outfielder Michael Cuddyer was their biggest signing, as they inked the 2013 NL batting champ to a two-year, $21 million deal. Aside from a low-key signing of John Mayberry, Jr., the team the Mets had last year is largely the team they’ll bring into 2015.

The Mets unfortunately lost Zack Wheeler to Tommy John surgery, but their starting rotation is still quite solid. It includes veteran Bartolo Colon (their Opening Day starter), youngster Jacob DeGrom, Jon Niese, and Dillon Gee. DeGrom was superb in his rookie season in 2014, finishing with a 2.69 ERA and a 144/43 K/BB ratio in 140 1/3 innings, earning him NL Rookie of the Year honors. If he can reprise his performance, the Mets would have two ace-caliber pitchers at the top of their rotation.

As far as offense goes, they’ll be relying on some young players to take the next step up. Catching Travis d’Arnaud started off slow last season, but caught fire in June following a brief demotion to Triple-A. From June 24 through the end of the season, d’Arnaud posted an .805 OPS with 10 home runs and 32 RBI in 276 plate appearances. The 26-year-old has the potential to become a top-ten catcher this season.

23-year-old Wilmer Flores will be starting everyday over Ruben Tejada after a long winter of speculation. Tejada has failed to live up to expectations over parts of five seasons with the Mets, posting a .645 OPS over 1,778 plate appearances. Flores posted similarly weak offensive numbers last season and is a worse defender, but he’s a couple years younger and has a bit more power potential. The Mets had a great deal of interest in acquiring a shortstop from outside the organization during the winter – including Jimmy Rollins – but nothing ever materialized, so they’ll be expecting Flores to man the position over the course of the season.

The Mets will also be relying on Juan Lagares in center field. He is arguably the best defensive center fielder in baseball but he leaves a bit to be desired at the plate. Last season, though, he posted an above-average adjusted OPS of 102 (100 is average). In 452 plate appearances, Lagares showed gap power with 24 doubles and three triples along with only four home runs, and he stole 13 bases as well.

What else is going on?

  • Third baseman David Wright is hoping to bounce back from the worst season of his career. He batted .269/.324/.374 with eight home runs and 63 RBI in 586 plate appearances. He was hampered by shoulder problems throughout much of the second half. Wright is now 32 years old and the expectations aren’t nearly as high as they once were. But for the Mets to seriously contend, they need him to return to a .290-ish average with 20-plus homers in the middle of the lineup.
  • Lost in the Harvey hoopla is the fact that Bobby Parnell is returning from Tommy John surgery himself. The right-hander missed just about the entirety of the 2014 season after emerging as a reliable late-inning option for the Mets the year prior, saving 22 games with a 2.16 ERA and a 44/12 K/BB ratio in 50 innings. He threw 20 pitches in a minor league game on Saturday, which is the next step towards his eventual return. Parnell will likely be out until May. Unless Jenrry Mejia struggles in the closer’s role, Parnell should end up in a set-up role.
  • The Mets chose to give Bartolo Colon the honor of pitching on Opening Day in Washington against the Nationals and Jacob deGrom the honor of pitching the Mets’ home opener against the Phillies. It’s a bit surprising that they didn’t give Harvey either honor as he’s both the Mets’ best pitcher and their most popular player. Though an expected home sellout regardless of who’s pitching may have given the Mets’ brass reason to create an incentive (Harvey) to show up for the second home game of the season.
  • Manager Terry Collins said that he won’t platoon first baseman Lucas Duda against left-handed pitchers to begin the season. Duda is the Mets’ biggest power threat, as he blasted 30 homers with 92 RBI last season in 596 plate appearances. However, he did show a severe platoon split, with a .915 OPS against right-handers and .516 against lefties. That’s not too far away from his career averages of .847 and .610, respectively. Reserve 1B/OF John Mayberry, Jr. would make a nice platoon partner, as Mayberry has a career .857 OPS against lefties.
  • Second baseman Daniel Murphy, currently nursing a hamstring injury, is entering what could be his final year with the Mets as he is eligible for free agency after the season. The Mets are not expected to offer him a contract extension, which means that there’s a strong possibility they trade Murphy by the July 31 deadline. Murphy, who turns 30 on April 1, made his first All-Star team last season, finishing with a .289/.332/.403 slash line along with nine home runs, 57 RBI, and 13 stolen bases in 642 plate appearances.

Prediction: The Mets remain in contention for the NL Wild Card for most of the season, but eventually fall behind the Miami Marlins for a third-place finish in the NL East with an 80-82 record.