David Wright

PITTSBURGH, PA - JUNE 25:  Todd Frazier #21 of the Cincinnati Reds on deck in the seventh inning during the game against the Pittsburgh Pirates at PNC Park on June 25, 2015 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.  (Photo by Justin K. Aller/Getty Images)

Reds GM Walt Jocketty says he’s not trading Todd Frazier


The Reds sit at 36-41 on the year and are widely-expected to be sellers leading up to the July 31 non-waiver trade deadline. However, contrary to some speculation, Reds general manager Walt Jocketty told John Fay of the Cincinnati Enquirer today that he has no plans to trade third baseman Todd Frazier.

“No, I wouldn’t trade him,” he said. “I think all that talk is coming from the New York media.”

He’s not wrong. With David Wright’s status in question due to spinal stenosis, some in the New York media have opined that Frazier would be a “perfect fit” for the Mets. He’s second in the majors with 25 home runs, so his production is a big part of that, but he’s also from Toms River, New Jersey and would bring that local flavor to the mix. It makes sense in a hypothetical scenario, but it’s mostly wishful thinking. The 29-year-old Frazier is making $3.75 million this year and $8.25 million in 2016 before one final year of arbitration in 2017, so he could bring a monster haul if the Reds decide to move him, but there’s nothing to indicate that they have considered it. There’s also no rush to make a decision on his future unless they are overwhelmed by an offer.

While Frazier is off the table, impending free agents like Johnny Cueto and Mike Leake are likely to be traded in the next month. Aroldis Chapman, a luxury for a non-contender, could also be dealt.

Time to beat the “Bobby Bonilla is still being paid by the Mets!” thing into the ground

19 Apr 1999:  Bobby Bonilla #25 of the New York Mets looks on during the game against the Montreal Expos at the Shea Stadium in Flushing, New York. The Expos defeated the Mets 4-2.

Today is July 1. That’s Canada Day, so happy Canada Day! I hope, like me, you’ll be blasting Rush and eating Timbits all day long!

It’s also the day that the Mets have to pay Bobby Bonilla $1.2 million, as they have since 2011 and will have to until 2036. People will laugh at that last one like crazy. It’s become an annual “LOL Mets!” joke. But it’s about the hackiest and easiest “LOL Mets!” joke around. And as many have noted, it’s not even in the top 10 of things to laugh at the Mets over. The quick version:

  • Essentially this is deferred compensation. While it wasn’t super common for teams to do it back when Bonilla agreed to that deal, it is far more common now. Let’s see what Max Scherzer’s payouts look like when he’s still accepting huge checks from the Nats seven years after he retired
  • One thing that makes Bonilla’s deal stick out is the interest he’s getting: 8%. That’s high, but as The Bad Economist pointed out a few years back, the prime rate when he signed the deal was 8.5%. The Mets probably should’ve made his interest a floating figure rather than fixing it at 8% — Bonilla is getting a windfall as a result — but that’s down to the Mets’ owners’ well-documented bad financial instincts and their misguided belief that they’d make 15% on any investments in perpetuity, not the silliness of the structure.
  • The Mets got use of the $5.9 million Bonilla deferred for years. And hey, for a lot of that time they probably DID get 15% on it because they were early investors in a ponzi scheme! But even if they put that in a non-criminal investment, they made money on it. They got something for that money. Even conservatively invested, a good half of the $30 million or so Bonilla is getting after interest will have been paid for.
  • And they got more than just the investment. As Dan Lewis pointed out five years ago, the $5.9 that was freed up for 2000 was used to bite off a huge chunk of the salaries owed to Mike Hampton and Derek Bell, for whom they traded and who helped them reach the World Series. When Hampton walked to take advantage of the good schools in the Denver area, they used the compensation pick to draft a kid named David Wright. None of that happens without deferring Bonilla’s salary given their payroll crunch at the time.

So mock the Mets all you want. Mock them for trading for Bonilla in the first place (though they only gave up Mel Rojas for him, and he was clinically dead by then). Mock them for their choice of interest rate. But don’t mock them for deferring Bonilla’s salary, because it was a good move for them at the time that allowed them to make moves they wouldn’t have otherwise made, including a move that helped them win a pennant.

Besides, there are things far more recent to mock them for anyway. And why not dwell on those?

Daniel Murphy returns from disabled list, Mets send Dilson Herrera back to minors

Daniel Murphy, Lucas Duda
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Daniel Murphy is back from the disabled list after missing the past four weeks with a strained quadriceps muscle and the Mets have decided to make him a full-time third baseman after previously using him mostly at second base.

No one is quite sure when All-Star third baseman David Wright will be back, so Murphy will take over for him at the hot corner and the Mets will shift Wilmer Flores to second base after using him at shortstop for the past three months.

Murphy has shifted around a lot defensively over the years, but his offensive production has been pretty consistent and before the quadriceps injury he was having a typical season hitting .283 with four homers and a .749 OPS in 55 games.

To make room for Murphy’s return the Mets demoted 21-year-old Dilson Herrera back to the minors.