Tag: David Ortiz

David Ortiz, J.P. Arencibia, Adam Hamari
AP Photo

Video: David Ortiz hits his 500th career home run


Red Sox DH David Ortiz joined the 500 home run club on Saturday night in Tampa against the Rays. He entered the night sitting on 498. In the first inning, he slugged a three-run home run off of lefty starter Matt Moore, then followed up in the fifth inning with a solo blast off of Moore.

No. 500 was a no-doubter. Ortiz sat on a low-and-inside breaking ball and ripped it many rows back in right-center field at Tropicana Field. He slowly trotted around the bases as if to savor the moment, then was greeted in front of the visitors’ dugout by his teammates. The relievers and catchers in the bullpen trotted down to add to the crowd.

The next milestone for Ortiz is 505, which would put him ahead of Eddie Murray for sole possession of 26th on baseball’s all-time home run list.

Video: Xander Bogaerts hits a Little League grand slam against the Phillies

Xander Bogaerts

Red Sox shortstop Xander Bogaerts helped his team take a commanding 7-0 lead in the fourth inning against the Phillies on Saturday, clearing the bases and coming around to score on what should have been only a double, but turned out to be a Little League grand slam.

Bogaerts slashed an Alec Asher offering down the right field line. Right fielder Aaron Altherr corralled the ball and hit cutoff man Cesar Hernandez. Hernandez fired a weak throw to catcher Carlos Ruiz, bouncing off of him and into foul territory. Betts, at third base, used the opportunity to scamper home. Bogaerts was credited with a double and three RBI, advancing to third base on the relay throw home and scoring on Hernandez’s throwing error.

David Ortiz followed up with a solo home run, his 30th of the season and the 496th of his career.

David Ortiz tweets his happiness about the Deflategate decision

World Series - Boston Red Sox v St Louis Cardinals - Game Four

Look, Deflategate posts are gold, man. And I’m sitting in baseball land over here, like a sucker, with virtually no way to get in on that haul. It’s hard!

I thought that maybe I could, once again, note just how horribly and consistently wrong ESPN’s legal “expert” Lester Munson is about all things upon which he is called to opine, but that’s beating a dead horse at this point, yes?

Thank God, then, for David Ortiz, who has given me an excuse to use the word “Deflategate” in a headline on a blog post on the world wide web:


That word’s very presence will likely make this the most trafficked post I do all day. We can talk about whether that, or the world for that matter, is fair, but in the end, isn’t web traffic what it’s really all about?

If you’re interested in this topic beyond its status as gold-plated clickbait and raw nihilism, go read Mike Florio’s copious content on the topic at ProFootballTalk.

David Ortiz is more likely to be boned in Hall of Fame voting for being a DH than for PED stuff

David Ortiz

I’ll preface this by saying — though I presume most of you know that I think this anyway — that whatever stock you put in David Ortiz’s PED associations, I do not think they should enter into his Hall of Fame candidacy one iota. To the extent there is stuff on him it’s generally weak stuff about being on a positive test list that was never to have seen the light of day and which, due to the procedures in place and the passage of time, Ortiz has no ability to refute in the manner any other person accused of using PEDs has the right to refute. He’s kinda boned in that regard.

And, of course, because I’m a PED apologist, for purposes of his Hall of Fame case, I really don’t even care if he was suspended for PEDs last week. I hope I don’t need to rehash my arguments about why I feel that way. If you’re a new student here, ask the person in the desk next to you. He or she can provide you with background. I’ll start you out with this little thing which makes me wonder if Ortiz hasn’t actually had more brushes with PEDs than most people say and offer that, really, I don’t care about it insofar as it affects his Hall of Fame case or his legacy.

With all of that out of the way, let’s read Ken Rosenthal’s article about Ortiz’s Hall of Fame case which, he correctly notes, will likely be complicated by that PED association:

Ortiz likely will not appear on the ballot until at least ’21, and likely not drop off it – if he falls short of the 75 percent minimum necessary for election – until at least ’31.

That’s a long time, folks.

Time, perhaps, for the voters to reconsider their views on players alleged to have used performance-enhancing drugs, as Ortiz was in 2009 when the New York Times reported that he was on a list of 104 players who had tested positive in ’03.

Rosenthal’s argument is that, perhaps, the minds of Hall of Fame voters will change some time between 2021 and 2031.

I think they may change, but I think that if Ortiz were to appear on the ballot tomorrow, the PED stuff wouldn’t matter for him a bit. Mostly because he, like Andy Pettitte, has never been considered a “cheater” by the anti-PED crew the way others with similar evidence against them have. For example, Sammy Sosa, who hit over 600 home runs and who, people’s speculation and some amount of reasonable conjecture notwithstanding, actually has no more hard PED evidence against him than Ortiz has. He’s not sniffing Cooperstown, ever, and he doesn’t even get the benefit of a baseball-based breakdown like Ortiz will get.

Rosenthal also mentions Ortiz’s status as a DH impacting his case. I actually think a lot more people will hold that against him than the PED stuff. Which shows you that, if Hall of Fame voters are irrational about one thing, they can be even more irrational about another, less reasonable thing if given the chance.

A White Sox fan working on the Wrigley Field renovation claims he buried a Sox cap in the concrete

Wrigley Bleachers


Mulder: He psyched the guy out, he put the whammy on him!

Scully [flatly, unconvinced]: Please explain to me the scientific nature of the Whammy.

I’m on Team Scully now and always. I certainly don’t get this stuff. I don’t believe in curses, be they Bambino or Goat-inspired. I don’t believe in jinxes or hexes or anything like that. The extent to which I give the Whammy any sort of credence begins and ends with the old “Press Your Luck” gameshow. Beyond that . . . STOP!

But baseball fans tend to buy into this stuff. Either for real or as an excuse for a prank. Remember back in 2008 when a Red Sox fan working on the new Yankee Stadium buried a David Ortiz jersey in the concrete? That jinx worked so well that the Yankees won the World Series the first year the park opened.

Now, at least if a construction worker and a photograph is to be believed, the same thing has happened in Chicago. From Allison Horne:


For their part, the Cubs (a) aren’t buying it; and (b) don’t even care if it is true. From Fox 32 in Chicago:

A spokesman for the Cubs says they won’t do anything because they doubt the picture is legit.

“Cubs President Theo Epstein was more to the point when FOX 32 asked him about the cap controversy as he walked past the park. He told me–quote: ‘I couldn’t give two . . . ‘ . . . Well, I can’t say that word but it rhymes with hits.”

Oh well. If history is any guide Congrats on the Cubs’ impending World Series victory.