Tag: Daniel Bard

Jonathan Broxton

The Reds re-sign Jonathan Broxton to a three-year, $21 million deal


UPDATE: Yes, it was close to Brandon League’s deal. Ken Rosenthal reports that Broxton is getting three years and $21 million guaranteed. The salaries climb, paying him $4 million in 2013, $7 million in 2014, $9 million in 2015 and either a $1 million buyout or a $9 million option for 2016.

That may seem crazy for a guy like Broxton, but I bet that becomes the going rate for adequate-but-not-spectacular closers here pretty soon.

1:25 AM: CBSSports.com’s Jon Heyman reports that the Reds and Jonathan Broxton have come to terms on a multiyear deal that is set to be announced Wednesday.

It’s expected to be a three-year pact, and one imagines it’ll come in close to Brandon League’s three-year, $22.5 million deal with the Dodgers.

The plan appears to be for Broxton to step into the closer’s role, with Aroldis Chapman joining Johnny Cueto, Mat Latos, Bronson Arroyo and Homer Bailey in the rotation. Mike Leake would work in relief.

It’s a switch with tons of upside, but also with plenty of risk. Of the three biggest relief-to-starting conversion stories last year, only one paid off: Chris Sale with the White Sox. Daniel Bard was a bust for Boston, and Neftali Feliz got hurt in Texas and needed Tommy John surgery.

And then there’s Broxton. He was a perfectly effective reliever with the Royals and Reds last year, amassing a 2.48 ERA in 58 innings. However, his margin for error certainly isn’t what it was. During his first five years with the Dodgers, he averaged at least 10.5 strikeouts per nine innings every season, topping out at 13.5 in 2009. Last year, he was all of the way down to 7.0 K/9 IP.

Personally, I’m all for taking the chance on moving Chapman to the rotation. Still, I would have gone in a different direction for a closer replacement. Re-signing Ryan Madson to a one-year deal would have been the better move.

Bobby Valentine dishes on the 2012 Red Sox, to dress up like an elf next month

Bobby Valentine

Bobby Valentine spoke at Salem State University last night as part of a speaker’s series. Peter Gammons was the moderator and audience questions were taken.  Some highlights from CSNNewEngland.com:

  • The front office wanted “a quieter, calmer” version of Bobby Valentine during the season, so he was told to tone down his usually effusive comments to the press;
  • He’s happy about his future and thinks it is bright. “I have a million plans, running around the country, trying to make my life worthwhile,” he said. Most immediate plan: “In December, he will rappel down the side of the tallest building in his hometown of Stamford, Conn., as a charitable fundraiser.  He will be dressed as an elf.”  Brian Cashman has done this several times, actually. It’s for a good cause.
  • He doesn’t think the 2012 Red Sox should be defined by their record and believes that “the team is going to be better because of all the nonsense this year.”
  • Takes a swipe at Kelly Shoppach, who he said was always begging for playing time and the front office, whose attitude and leaks he criticizes, and Daniel Bard. Also, when asked by an audience member what it was like to watch Daniel Bard “slowly implode,” Valentine said “you you thought that was slow?”

Someone should probably hire him now. Not my team or the team of anyone I care about, but someone.

Red Sox banking on John Farrell becoming a better manager in Boston

John Farrell

There’s simply no way the Red Sox could have looked at John Farrell’s work in Toronto and came away with the idea that he was a great manager. The Blue Jays were a horrible baserunning team, they had Omar Vizquel questioning their clubhouse leadership and their win total decreased in both of his years at the helm.

It was Farrell’s success with pitchers in Boston that played a huge role in getting him the Blue Jays gig. Yet Farrell could do nothing to aid Ricky Romero and Brett Cecil as they regressed. The only Toronto starter to break through under his tutelage was Brandon Morrow and then only for 21 starts.

And yet the Red Sox wanted Farrell back. Badly enough to surrender compensation to Toronto to get him, though the price (infielder Mike Aviles and perhaps taking on first baseman Adam Lind’s salary) wasn’t as high as many speculated.

Three guesses as to why they chose him:

1. There’s simply no one better equipped to help Jon Lester, Clay Buchholz and Daniel Bard overcome their struggles. All three had their best seasons in 2010 immediately before Farrell departed. And while the collapses for all three came this year, it’s worth noting that all took steps backwards in 2011 first.

2. Farrell already has the respect of the clubhouse. And unlike the team’s 2012 bench coach Tim Bogar and former bench coach DeMarlo Hale, he doesn’t carry the stink of the 2011 collapse around with him, since he left after the 2010 season.

3. The Red Sox are probably assuming that improvement will come with experience. Terry Francona was a dreadful manager, far worse than Farrell, when he was in Philadelphia. I thought Bob Melvin was brutal in Seattle. Look at him now in Oakland.

As I made clear a couple of weeks ago, I’m not particularly impressed with the choice. Brad Ausmus, Dave Martinez and Sandy Alomar Jr. are candidates to become the next great manager, and the Red Sox bypassed them all in favor of a guy whose first gig ended in failure. That said, if Farrell can get better results from Lester and Buchholz and maybe even get Bard turned around, it’ll more than make up for whatever in-game strategy mistakes he makes.

Reviewing the rotations; Nats, Dodgers lead the way

David Price

A couple of months before the season, I used my Rotoworld projections to rank the rotations, based strictly on ERA, from 1-30. Let’s look at that list now and see where each team starters’ measure up about 40 percent of the way through the season.

Projected rank – Team – Current rank

1. Phillies: 3.39 – 10
2. Cardinals: 3.648 – 7
3. Giants: 3.649 – 3
4. Angels: 3.68 – 4
5. Rays: 3.69 – 5
6. Nationals: 3.70 – 1
7. Red Sox: 3.70 – 27
8. Braves: 3.71 – 17
9. Marlins: 3.74 – 8
10. Dodgers: 3.77 – 2
11. Brewers: 3.81 – 14
12. Tigers: 3.83 – 22
13. Yankees: 3.89 – 16
14. Mariners: 3.93 – 23
15. Diamondbacks: 3.93 – 12
16. Reds: 3.94 – 11
17. Padres: 3.97 – 18
18. Rangers: 3.98 – 9
19. White Sox: 4.04 – 19
20. Athletics: 4.07 – 20
21. Cubs: 4.08 – 21
22. Mets: 4.08 – 6
23. Blue Jays: 4.10 – 15
24. Indians: 4.12 – 25
25. Pirates: 4.18 – 13
26. Rockies: 4.24 – 30
27. Astros: 4.24 – 26
28. Twins: 4.28 – 29
29. Royals: 4.32 – 28
30. Orioles: 4.36 – 24

Not too shabby, right? Eight of the teams projected to be in the top 10 are currently in the top 10. The exceptions there are the Braves and Red Sox. I was expecting good things from Mike Minor and Daniel Bard, but both have been major disappointments. The Red Sox, all of the way down at No. 27, don’t have a single starter with a sub-4.00 ERA, though Clay Buchholz and Josh Beckett have been much better lately. They won’t get back into the top 10 this year, but they’re sure to keep improving.

Obviously, the Mets have really exceeded expectations, thanks to a healthy Johan Santana and a superb R.A. Dickey. The Rangers have overcome their hitter friendly ballpark so far, but typically, ERAs do rise throughout the summer in the heat of Texas. The Pirates have been another nice surprise, but with Erik Bedard struggling of late and Charlie Morton down, they no longer crack the top 10.

The Dodgers, up at No. 2, are a team I thought would be much better last year (I had them third then behind the Phillies and Giants), but I wasn’t very optimistic about the Chris Capuano and Aaron Harang additions and I was down on Chad Billingsley headed into this season. Indeed, all of the non-Clayton Kershaw starters are outpitching their projections. They’ve even gotten a 1.82 ERA from Nathan Eovaldi with Ted Lilly out the last few weeks.

And then there’s the Nationals in first. Their top four starters have ERAs of 2.45, 2.52, 2.92 and 3.02 at the moment. I was pretty high on that group going in; the weakest of the bunch, Edwin Jackson, was the No. 42 starting pitcher in my fantasy rankings. But the consistent excellence from the rotation has been remarkable. Even Ross Detwiler, who was (wrongly) pulled from the rotation to give Chien-Ming Wang a shot, had a 3.88 ERA in his nine starts. Wang is at 5.02 after three turns.

Daniel Bard had a good relief outing at Triple-A

Daniel Bard Getty
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It doesn’t say much for his overall status that this is actually semi-newsworthy, but here goes: Daniel Bard threw two scoreless innings at Triple-A yesterday.

Working as a reliever Bard struck out four batters, walked one, and allowed zero hits in two frames for Pawtucket, lowering his ERA there to 9.00 ERA in four outings.

On one hand an impressive two-inning appearance is a big step in the right direction for Bard. On the other hand throwing two innings, no matter how impressive, seemingly indicates that he won’t be ready to jump back into the Red Sox’s rotation anytime soon. Or at least not without having pitch count limitations.

Returning to the majors as a reliever, however, could occur at any time and ultimately considering how shaky Bard looked transitioning from the bullpen to the rotation he might be better off if that happens anyway.