Tag: Dallas Keuchel

Dallas Keuchel

Astros, Dallas Keuchel table extension talks until the off-season


The Astros and ace Dallas Keuchel have tabled extension talks until the off-season, Jon Heyman of CBS Sports reports. He notes that the Astros would like to sign him to at least a four-year deal, which would cover at least one of his free agency years.

Keuchel, 27, will become eligible for arbitration for the first time after the season, and won’t be eligible for free agency until after the 2018 season. He’s due a hefty raise over his 2015 salary of $524,500, as he currently leads the American League with 16 wins and a 2.24 ERA, along with a 173/42 K/BB ratio over 192 2/3 innings. The lefty finished with a 2.93 ERA last season as well.

The Astros enter play Friday with a 73-61 record, leading the AL West by two games over the Rangers. They stand a good chance at ending their post-season drought, which extends back to 2005, so it may not be until late October or November that the two sides will discuss a new contract.

And That Happened: Monday’s scores and highlights

Matt Williams

Cardinals 8, Nationals 5: The Cards mounted a five-run rally in the seventh that had the Nationals fans in my Twitter timeline saying unspeakable things about Matt Williams, the Nationals and, in some cases, the very dilemma of human existence. Really, they started to get kinda deep about the philosophic abyss that confronts us all. I almost felt bad for them but then I remembered that they’re Nationals fans, so who gives a rip? OK, that’s not fair. Even Nats fans don’t deserve Matt Williams. Which perhaps might hurt Matt Williams’ feelings to hear, but given that he’s peacefully dozing in the dugout, he’s really not hearing it at all. Shhh! Don’t tell him to bring in Drew Storen during the rally! It’s only the seventh inning! Williams’ little analog alarm clock with Goofy’s arms as the hands doesn’t start ringing for Storen until the eighth!

Dodgers 5, Giants 4: Adrian Gonzalez hit a bases loaded single in the 14th inning to walk it off. It was a long game. How long? It started in August and ended in September! Wow! In other news, the Giants really can’t be losing head-to-head games with the Dodgers if they wanna make the playoffs. It’s now a four and a half game lead for L.A.

Red Sox 4, Yankees 3: Old: David Ortiz hits career homer 495. Young: Mookie Betts homered and Jackie Bradley Jr. had three hits and scored twice. He’s been up and down and people have been expecting a lot from him for more than a couple of years now, but in 43 big league games this year Bradley is hitting .277/.358/.555 with outstanding outfield defense.

Rays 6, Orioles 3: Six shutout innings aided by an amazing grab by Kevin Kiermaier to rob Manny Machado of a homer.

Baltimore has lost 11 of 12. Asdrubal Cabrera, Evan Longoria and Tim Beckham homered for Tampa Bay.

Indians 4, Blue Jays 2: Danny Salazar struck out ten and Jerry Sands singled home the go-ahead run in the seventh. Sands’ failure to pan out as a prospect over the past couple of years has obscured the fact that he is the best 1950s-60s-era Vegas comedian to ever play Major League Baseball. And it’s all the more impressive given that he wears a sequined tuxedo jacket and a ruffled shirt when he plays in the outfield.

Marlins 4, Braves 0: It was obvious that the Braves were going to lose here given that they traded away their clubhouse leader Jonny Gomes last night. You laugh, but when the Royals win the World Series and some baseball writer credits Gomes’, like, 11 ineffective plate appearances but his excellent top-step-of-the-dugout fist-pumping for “providing the leadership they lacked in 2014,” try not to injure yourself as you violently roll your eyes into your head. In other news, stop me if you’ve heard this one before: Shelby Miller pitched well, allowing one run on six hits and no walks over seven innings yet failed to win for the 19th straight outing because the Braves provided him zero in the form of run support. He has a 2.56 ERA on the year and a 5-12 record.

Mets 3, Phillies 1: Eight shutout innings for Bartolo Colon. Which, to be fair to the Phillies, is understandable as Colon was wearing camouflage:


Given his stealthy appearance, to Phillies batters it had to look like the ball was floating in mid air and suddenly hurled in their direction as if propelled by an otherworldly spirit.

Reds 13, Cubs 6: Adam Duvall and Eugenio Suarez hit two-run homers in a four-run sixth inning. Those four runs all came against Justin Grimm. Who actually came in with a lead and gave up those four runs in one third of an inning. If only there was a word to describe Grimm’s performance. Bleak? Ghastly? Gruesome? Give me a few minutes, I’ll think of one.

Astros 8, Mariners 3: Dallas Keuchel got his 16th win and Carlos Correa hit his 16th homer.




Rockies 5, Diamondbacks 4: No one cares about this game at this point of the season so let’s watch Brandon Barnes eat dirt.

Athletics 11, Angels 5: The Angels got slaughtered, the details of which you can read in the box score. The important part here is that Shane Victorino broke the Oakland Coliseum when he ran into the dang wall:


The A’s really need to find the receipt for that place.

Padres 7, Rangers 0: Tyson Ross tossed seven shutout innings and had an RBI single to [all together now] help his own cause. Texas’ lead in the race for the second wild card slot is down to one game over the Twins.

And That Happened: Tuesday’s scores and highlights

Houston Astros v New York Yankees

Astros 15, Yankees 1: The Astros beating the hell out of the Yankees is the secondary story here. The primary story is the benches clearing after the Yankees took issue with Carlos Gomez’s deportment. Sure, Gomez and Evan Gattis both homered and drove in four runs and sure Dallas Keuchel got his 15th win, but this happened too:


Which is absolutely dumb. The Yankees were mad at Gomez for being upset that he popped out. And after the game Joe Girardi actually said Gomez should “play the game the right” and to “show some professionalism.” This from the guy managing the bench where dudes not even playing in the game were barking at Gomez. Much the same came from Yankees catcher John Ryan Murphy — “there’s a right way and a wrong way to play the game,” he said. Dude is 24. We’ve covered that kind of thing a bunch of times around here and I’ll have a bigger post on it later, but it’s beyond stupid. If the behavior of a guy on a team with a big lead bugs you, maybe don’t get your asses beat so bad by that team and it’ll never come up. How about YOU play the game the right way? Like literally correctly and in a fashion where you aren’t losing by a ton and thus quick to anger at any perceived slight?

Nationals 8, Padres 3: The Nationals got some offense — a Ryan Zimmerman grand slam chief among them — and Stephen Strasburg allowed two runs over six. Entering play last night the Nationals were only a game or so closer to a playoff spot than the Padres by the way. And they didn’t make up any ground on the Mets because . . .

Mets 6, Phillies 5: . . . the wheels fell off for Jerome Williams and Jeanmar Gomez in the sixth inning allowing the Mets to rally. Things got testy here too when, in the seventh, Hansel Robles quick-pitched Darin Ruf, causing Jeff Francoeur and the Phillies to bark and Larry Bowa to get ejected. Bowa got his money’s worth too:


Quick pitch politics are far more rare than bat-flip and frustration politics. So rare, in fact, that not even everyone knows the rules. Get this:

“I was surprised they were mad about it,” Robles said through an interpreter. “The batter was in the box and the umpire pointed to me.”

Said [Terry] Collins, “Until they make the (quick) pitch illegal, you can do it.”

It is illegal, Terry!

Rule 8.01(b) Comment: With no runners on base, the pitcher is not required to come to a complete stop when using the Set Position. If, however, in the umpire’s judgment, a pitcher delivers the ball in a deliberate effort to catch the batter off guard, this delivery shall be deemed a quick pitch, for which the penalty is a ball. See Rule 8.05(e) Comment.

. . .

Rule 8.05(e) Comment: A quick pitch is an illegal pitch. Umpires will judge a quick pitch as one delivered before the batter is reasonably set in the batter’s box. With runners on base the penalty is a balk; with no runners on base, it is a ball. The quick pitch is dangerous and should not be permitted.

Oh well.

Angels 8, Tigers 7: Man, what got into everyone last night? Bad vibes all around. Jered Weaver was seen yelling in the dugout after Mike Trout lost a ball in the lights. He also hit a batter and, a couple batters later, it looked like Miguel Cabrera was sort of pointing at him and taunting although that wasn’t 100% clear. In any event, Weaver pitched poorly but good enough to win as the Angels blew a 4-0 lead but then piled four more on. And Trout atoned for that ball he lost in the lights:

Indians 11, Brewers 6: Michael Brantley homered twice and Josh Tomlin survived giving up three homers of his own and got his first win at Progressive Field in a dog’s age.

Rockies 5, Braves 1: Braves third baseman Adonis Garcia had a couple of big hits right after he came up. But between is defense and the impending arrival of Hector Olivera, his days are numbered. Nights in which he commits three errors allowing four unearned runs merely hasten that process along. It was Atlanta’s 12th loss in 15 games. Wheeeeeee!

Dodgers 5, Reds 1: The Dodgers snap a five-game losing streak thanks to Alex Wood taking a shutout into the sixth inning and JimmyRollins and Justin Turner each hitting two-run home runs. The Dodgers turned three double plays behind Wood too, making life easier.

Marlins 5, Pirates 2: Dee Gordon stole four bases, reaching on a couple of infield hits. He’s also still batting .333 on the year which I wouldn’t have guessed. Haven’t paid that much attention to him since his hot start and since the Marlins feel out of relevance early in the year. I’ll be damned. Our friend Old Gator pointed out to me that in the 7th inning the Marlins had a triple, a walk and four stolen bases – and they scored zero runs that inning. That’s pretty hard to do, one assumes.

Twins 11, Rays 7: That’s five straight wins for the Twins, who are only a half game out of the wild card. Brian Dozier, Miguel Sano and Eddie Rosario homered.

Blue Jays 6, Rangers 5: Down by one in the ninth the Blue Jays rallied for two and the win. Troy Tulowitzki had three hits, including the game-tying RBI single in the ninth. The go-ahead run scored on an Adrian Beltre throwing error. Which, man, you don’t see that sort of thing happen too dang often.

White Sox 5, Red Sox 4: Sox win. Trayce Thompson drove in three runs. He was a homer shy of the cycle. He was called up at the beginning of the month and has gone 12-for-23 in part time play. The White Sox rattled off 15 hits in all.

Royals 3, Orioles 2: Kansas City had a 3-0 lead after three innings and it held up. Leads hold up, even early leads with small margins, when you got Luke Hochevar, Kelvin Herrera and Wade Davis going for you. They didn’t even need Greg Holland. Ho-hum, Kansas City fans say, when do the playoffs start?

Cardinals 9, Diamondbacks 1: A four-run first inning was all the Cardinals needed. Tommy Pham singled twice and tripled, scoring three times. The Cards win their 80th game.

Mariners 6, Athletics 5: Oakland blew an early 5-0 lead. Robinson Cano doubled. According to the Associated Press, he became the first player to have at least 30 doubles in his first 11 seasons in the major leagues, passing Albert Pujols. In a year where you’re hitting .277, I suppose any accomplishment is worth celebrating.

Cubs 8, Giants 4: Jake Arrieta allowed only an unearned run over six innings, lowering his ERA to 2.22 and notching his 16th win on the year. Not that he needed to be so good as he had an 8-0 lead by the time the sixth inning rolled around. Kyle Schwarber homered. He does that a lot.

Dallas Keuchel and the Astros are talking multi-year deal

Dallas Keuchel

Astros ace Dallas Keuchel is making the minimum salary this season and won’t be eligible for free agency until after the 2018 season, but Evan Drellich of the Houston Chronicle reports that there have been multi-year contract talks.

Keuchel confirmed that some level of negotiations have taken place between his agent and the team, but didn’t get into details. It’s possible that the two sides may simply be discussing, say, a two-year deal to buy out his first couple seasons of arbitration eligibility, which would provide Keuchel with life-changing money and give the Astros some cost certainty.

If instead they’re working on a bigger deal that stretches into Keuchel’s free agency, then the money would be pretty huge considering he’s a 27-year-old top-of-the-rotation starter who followed up a breakout 2014 campaign by pitching even better this season with a 2.37 ERA and 156/41 K/BB ratio in 179 innings.

The Winners and Losers at the Trade Deadline

Cole Hamels

On some level it’s silly to declare winners and losers a mere hour after the trade deadline passes. For the buyers these trades, in the shortest term, are designed to help them get over the top and into the playoffs, so we can’t know until October if they were successful. For the seller it could be years before we know if the prospects they received in return truly paid off.

But this is the Internet, and things like “reason” and “waiting” are just not concepts that can be abided. And, at the very least, we can certainly talk about who, in our gut anyway, did OK this trading season. So let’s go with our gut for moment, shall we?

First, go check out our entire rundown of every deal of consequence at the deadline over at our Trade Deadline Tracker.source: Getty Images


Astros: Carlos Gomez helps fix their thin outfield, Scott Kazmir gives them another ace behind Dallas Keuchel and Mike Fiers helps solidify the back end of the rotation. And they got this haul despite not parting with any truly top prospects such as Vincent Velasquez, Mark Appel and Michael Feliz. A great upgrade in a go-for-it season without sacrificing any of that bright future? You gotta love it.

Royals: Ben Zobrist and Johnny Cueto are excellent win-now pickups, and the Royals are certainly winning now. Kansas City paid a pretty steep price for the Cueto rental — Brandon Finnegan, John Lamb and Cody Reed could all be a part of the Reds’ rotation over the next couple of years — but this is the Royals day and they are seizing it.

Tigers: It’s been a bad summer for Detroit and, at least as far as the public was concerned, they weren’t selling until about 48 hours ago. But in that 48 hours they got a lot of something out of what would’ve been nothing after this lost season. David Price was not going to sign with the Tigers after this year and, at most, they’d get a first round pick for him if they held on. Instead they got three nice arms in Daniel Norris, Matt Boyd and Jairo Labourt. Like the Cincy trio, all of these guys will figure in the Tigers’ major league future. They wouldn’t have even gotten a draft pick for Yoenis Cespedes, so getting a couple of arms for him — including a nice one in Double-A pitcher Michael Fulmer — was a decent return. Detroit sure didn’t want to sell, but if they had to, they did well.

Reds: For the reasons mentioned in the Royals comment, they got the most out of their big asset, Cueto. Their overall management of this roster has not been exemplary, but they made a good trade there. And, more importantly, they didn’t panic and move Jay Bruce and Todd Frazier just to say they moved them, which I feel would’ve been a mistake. They are both valuable bats at a time when bats are scarce. They can either try to move them through waivers in August or, more realistically, in the offseason when everyone is less panicky and it’s easier to see how to fit a position player into your plans than it is on the fly in July.

Blue Jays: This could be a situation in which, a couple of years from now, when they’re paying a declining Troy Tulowitzki and David Price has long since gone, they will regret these deals. But for now you have to credit them for going big rather than going home. They have a lot of ground to make up and they gave up a lot of talent to do it, but if these moves turn into an October run it will have been worth it. That’s what a lot of people who judge trades often forget when, ten years later, they ignore the veterans and only talk about the kids involved who turned into something. The Tigers traded John Smoltz for Doyle Alexander. Know what? They were right to do it given their situation in the summer of 1987 and don’t let anyone tell you different, even if it stings Tigers fans a bit to think about what life with Smoltz would’ve looked like.

Phillies: Ruben Amaro has gotten a load of crap over the years. And heck, maybe he didn’t make these moves. Maybe Pat Gillick or Andy MacPhail did. I don’t know. But whoever it was who called these shots, they got a decent return for Cole Hamels in the form of Jorge Alfaro, Jake Thompson, Nick Williams, Alec Asher, Jerad Eickhoff and Matt Harrison and a couple of nice relief prospects for Ben Revere. They also unloaded Jonathan Papelbon and the specter of his 2016 option. Maybe they should’ve rebuilt years ago, but they did the best with what they had now.

UPDATE:  OK, I’ll include the Mets here in their pickup of Cespedes. It certainly improved the offense. I’m not sure it’s enough — it’s still a pretty bad offense — but credit where it is due for addressing a problem.



No one really got hosed here, but the following teams didn’t make the sort of bold moves one would have assumed they would.

Marlins: OK, they’re true losers. Sorry, hard to sugarcoat this. They traded away guys who made money and who likely appeared on season ticket brochures in Mat Latos and Dan Haren. None of the prospects they got back seem projectable and all of their deals seemed aimed at salary relief. Which is par for the course for them.

Yankees: They didn’t have a lot to work with, but they definitely needed a starter or, short of that, another reliever to help that strong bullpen get stronger and diminish the impact of that problematic starting five. And . . . they did nothing. While Toronto picked up two huge pieces and even the Orioles added talent. They have a nice division lead and my bet now is that it holds up, but it was rather surprising not seeing the Yankees making any moves.

Dodgers: Picking up Mat Latos and Alex Wood help their depleted rotation, and Jose Peraza is a nice long-term piece for the Dodgers at second base, but given their money and their prospects, I’m rather shocked they weren’t in on the Price/Cueto/Hamels action. Some of their fans likely will be too. Certainly not hard losers — they improved their team –but they sort of surprised in their lack of big moves.

Braves: I’m somewhat torn here, because if you look at the Braves’ overall plan since they decided to blow things up last offseason, a lot of what they did makes sense and fits in a larger “smart moves” narrative. Including Bronson Arroyo in the deal that brought them Hector Olivera ended up — if you rationalize things just right — getting them Olivera and pitching prospect Touki Touissant for basically free, and that’s good. But you can also say that they traded a well-thought-of, team-controlled lefty starter and one of their top position playing prospects for a 30-year-old infielder who has never played in the bigs and who has an injury history. Which, eh.

Cardinals: They’re leading their division and seem like a team in good shape, but like a lot of clubs, just wanted one more bat. And they got it in Brandon Moss. So, good, right? Welp, I dunno. They gave up a nice pitching prospect in Rob Kaminsky to do it. You’d figure he could get you more. Maybe Ben Zobrist if they had moved aggressively? Hard to say, but it’s a lot for Moss, who has had a rotten year.

Cubs: A big caveat here in that, in their heart of hearts, I bet Theo Epstein and Jed Hoyer didn’t think they’d contend this year and thus don’t really feel comfortable trading a lot of talent for a 2015 run. If I were them I’d have a hard time doing that, that’s for sure. I’d be all about getting David Price next winter, frankly. Still, if they were going t0 make a move to make it look like they were making a move, I’m not sure why Dan Haren was that move. He has been OK overall, but he has pitched WAY WAY worse on the road than he has in Marlins Park and will likely give up a ton of homers in Wrigley Field. Indeed, I feel like his second half will be rather ugly.

OK, so that exercise is done. And, as noted above, maybe it was silly given that time is required to truly judge these moves. But this is the Internet, dang it, and the Internet is made for this kind of insta-analysis, right?