Tag: Dallas Braden

dallas braden getty

Dallas Braden retires from baseball at age 30


Via Susan Slusser of the San Francisco Chronicle:

Dallas Braden, the former A’s left-hander who pitched the 19th perfect game in major-league history, told me today that he is retiring after failing to come back from multiple shoulder surgeries.

“There is nothing left in there, it’s just a shredded mess,” Braden told Slusser by phone on Tuesday. “I left my arm on the mound at the Coliseum, and I’m OK with that. … [That perfect game] will always define the one solid day of work I had and the fact that I got to share it with my grandmother, only a few people appreciate the magnitude of that. That was living the dream. … You have to face your mortality one day.”

Braden mowed down 27 straight Rays batters on May 9, 2010, recording six strikeouts, seven groundball outs, 14 flyball outs and using 109 pitches. That moment produced these memorable images (via Getty):

source: Getty Images

source: Getty Images

source: Getty Images

Braden pitched only 18 major league innings after that 2010 campaign and will call it quits at age 30 having made just 94 total appearances in the bigs. He finishes with a 4.16 career ERA and 1.325 career WHIP.

Dallas Braden, who once twirled a perfect game, to showcase for teams in January

dallas braden ap

Lefty Dallas Braden tossed a perfect game against the Rays on Mother’s Day — May 9, 2010. He finished the year with a 3.50 ERA in 192.2 innings, ranking as a solid #3 option in the Athletics’ rotation behind Gio Gonzalez and Trevor Cahill. Following surgery on the anterior capsule in his left shoulder in 2011, and surgery to mend a partial tear of his rotator cuff in 2012, Braden hasn’t tossed a pitch in professional ball since April 16, 2011.

Susan Slusser of the San Francisco Chronicle reports that Braden plans to hold a showcase for interested parties in January in the hopes of attempting a comeback. We have seen pitchers come back in strong form even after spending a year or more out of pro baseball. Scott Kazmir bounced back with the Indians last season after a year in the independent league, and Ryan Vogelsong had a rebirth with the Giants after a three-year gap in his professional career.

Yusmeiro Petit so far from and so close to perfection

Yusmeiro Petit, Eric Chavez

Yusmeiro Petit was one pitch away from what might have been the most unlikely perfect game of all-time. Inches really. The 2-2 pitch to Eric Chavez easily could have been called a strike in a typical situation, even without the help overzealous umpires sometimes give in no-hitter situations.

Then Hunter Pence came up just short on Eric Chavez’s liner. In any ballpark besides AT&T Park, it would have been more likely to be an out. Because of the depth and the angle of the wall in right, right fielders in AT&T cheat more towards center than anywhere else. Pence made his best effort to come up with the ball; if he had been shaded one or two steps to his left, he may have gotten it.

As is, Philip Humber is probably the weakest pitcher to throw a perfect game, but his feat last April came against a pretty awful Mariners lineup. And considering that he had a fine 3.75 ERA in the year before his perfect game, he was certainly held in higher regard then than Petit is.

Because of injuries, Dallas Braden hasn’t done much at all since his perfect game in 2010, but he was a fine pitcher while healthy. Len Barker, who pitched his perfect game in 1981, is known now as a free agent bust, but he led the AL in strikeouts in both 1980 and 1981. Charlie Robertson, who threw the second perfect game after 1900, finished up his career 49-80 and probably ranks next in line after Humber.

I’m still going with Petit, though. The one-time Mets prospect entered the night 12-20 with a 5.37 ERA as a major leaguer. In eight seasons in Triple-A, he was 31-32 with a 4,36 ERA. Two years ago, he pitched in the Mexican League.

And his near perfect game came against a team that’s had playoff aspirations for most of the year. The Diamondbacks entered the night fifth in the NL in runs scored.

But there was Petit setting them all down quickly with his high-80s fastball. He threw just 95 pitches in the game.  I can’t speak for the whole contest, but for those last two innings, all of those pitches ended up right where he wanted them to. With a little more luck, he would have entered the record books as just the 22nd pitcher since 1900 to achieve perfection. He didn’t get there, but he took a big step towards accomplishing another goal: achieving a spot in the Giants’ 2014 rotation.

Pitcher who took $7 million for nothing decries “welfare leeches”

dallas braden getty

UPDATE: Braden has contacted me on Twitter, taking issue. He says that he does not believe all welfare recipients are “leeches.” Rather, only those who use drugs and receive public assistance are “leeches.”  He has not explained to me how that squares with his desire to “test the welfare leeches” for drugs. Because, if they’re only leeches once they use, why are we testing them? We already know they use!

Braden is a pitcher, not a writer, so it’s possible that he merely mistyped and demanded that something else be done with “leeches” besides testing them. And that the testing not be for “leeches” but for the good people who have fallen on hard time. So that we can determine if, in fact, they are leeches.

9:14 AM: One can believe that the welfare state as currently constructed is not the best way to help those in need and/or is not the best use of resources. That’s just a matter of philosophy and politics and values and stuff and reasonable people can disagree without being rude and insensitive.

Unemployed pitcher Dallas Braden, however, is not interested in philosophical debates:

Pretty big talk for a guy who took nearly $7 million from the Athletics for a grand total of three starts between 2011 and 2012.

Oh, wait: you mean there were extenuating circumstances there? His inability to pitch those years was because of injury and not because he was some lazy leech sucking off the teet of some rich benefactor without doing anything in return? That he actually would have preferred to work for his money but simply was unable to due to the hand he was dealt? But that’s impossible! I am told by people like Braden himself that everyone who is paid without having to work is an awful bum.

In other news: there are some people from the 209 who live on government assistance. I wonder what they think of their crusading superhero and lord protector.