Tag: Cody Asche

New York Yankees v Philadelphia Phillies

Report: “Scouts tracking” Phillies outfielder Ben Revere


Philadelphia’s outfield will be crowded whenever the Phillies decide to recall Cody Asche and Domonic Brown from Triple-A and Ken Rosenthal of FOXSports.com reports that scouts from other teams are “tracking” Ben Revere for a potential trade.

Revere was shifted to left field so the Phillies could use Odubel Herrera in center field and he simply doesn’t offer enough offensive upside to be a corner outfielder. Revere is a career .290 hitter with 50-steal speed, but his complete lack of power and walk-drawing ability have led to a .323 on-base percentage and .341 slugging percentage.

Tiny, slap-hitting corner outfielders who can’t crack a .700 OPS tend not to stick around long, but if teams view Revere as a plus defender in center field he could still have some value to them at age 27. He’s making $4.1 million this season and under team control via arbitration through 2017.

Phillies call up top prospect Maikel Franco from Triple-A

Maikel Franco

Philadelphia has called up third base prospect Maikel Franco from Triple-A, which was the assumed follow-up move to the Phillies demoting third baseman Cody Asche to Triple-A so he could make the switch to left field.

Franco is just 22 years old and his plate discipline needs work, but he hit .355 in 33 games at Triple-A to earn the call-up. He also finished last season on a major tear at Triple-A, although his overall numbers were underwhelming because of a brutal start.

Franco ranked as a consensus top-100 prospect this year and last year, typically being slotted into the 40-60 range for 2015. He’s shown good power in the minors, including 20 homers and 45 doubles in 166 total games at Triple-A, but he’s never drawn as many as 40 walks in a season.

Also of note: No doubt the Phillies will deny this was a factor, but by calling up Franco today he’ll finish precisely one day short of a full season’s worth of service time once combined with his September action last season. Coincidentally, of course. Funny how that works.

Phillies demote third baseman Cody Asche to Triple-A to become an outfielder

cody asche getty

Cody Asche has been the Phillies’ starting third baseman since mid-2013, but now they’re sending him back to Triple-A to transition from third base to left field.

Asche hitting just .247 with a .686 OPS in 201 career games obviously played a part as well, because if he’d hit, say, .287 with a .786 OPS and they wanted him to shift to the outfield it likely wouldn’t involve a demotion to the minors.

Asche spent most of 2013 at Triple-A, hitting .295 with 15 homers and an .837 OPS in 104 games. He’s never seen game action in the outfield as a professional, minors or majors.

Maikel Franco, a 22-year-old prospect currently playing at Triple-A, is projected as the Phillies’ long-term third baseman and could be ready for a call-up soon.

Phillies prospect Maikel Franco close to earning a promotion

Maikel Franco

Per CSN Philly’s Jim Salisbury, Phillies GM Ruben Amaro, Jr. said that third base prospect Maikel Franco is close to earning a promotion from Triple-A Lehigh Valley to the major leagues. Franco is currently batting .336/.359/.520 with three home runs and 17 RBI in 131 plate appearances with the IronPigs.

Franco, 22, made his major league debut in September last year, but struggled. He finished with a .404 OPS in 58 plate appearances. The Phillies entered play Monday averaging 2.84 runs per game, by far the lowest in baseball. As long as Franco doesn’t struggle the same way he did in 2014, he should be able to provide an offensive boost.

Current third baseman Cody Asche has struggled as of late, batting .145/.172/.200 in 58 plate appearances since April 23. Following Monday’s loss to the Pirates, the Phillies demoted Asche to Triple-A to get regular work in the outfield. That might help him retain some at-bats he might otherwise lose to Franco.

Phillies follow Jonathan Papelbon’s team meeting with another loss

Jonathan Papelbon

NEW YORK — About two hours before the Phillies took the field and were beaten by the New York Mets on Wednesday night, Jonathan Papelbon quietly asked a couple of reporters to leave the clubhouse because he wanted to say something to his teammates.

The players’ only meeting lasted just a few minutes. When it was over, Papelbon was vague about his reason for getting his teammates together.

“It was a team meeting about baseball, about playing the game,” he said, straight-faced. “It wasn’t a big deal.”

Papelbon then joked that the meeting was about setting up a Kangaroo Court, though that didn’t seem to hold water because meetings like that aren’t usually thrown together in the moments before a team goes out to stretch.

To know Papelbon is to know he does not like to lose and he especially does not like to be pushed around. Ric Flair would not approve. It’s very possible that Papelbon addressed his dislike for such in the meeting. After all, the Phillies were pushed around by the Mets on Tuesday night. It said it right there in a headline in the New York Daily News: Harvey’s Ut-check: Plunking Sends Message Mets No Longer Pushovers. The accompanying story praised the Mets for their recent dominance of the Phillies and swaggering pitcher Matt Harvey for making a statement by sticking a fastball between the 2 and 6 on iconic Phillie Chase Utley’s back.

If Papelbon’s team meeting was meant to rally the troops before the finale of the three-game series, well, it didn’t work.

The Phillies lost, 6-1, to their tormenters from Queens (see Instant Replay). The Mets swept the three-game series. They have beaten the Phillies in 15 of the last 19 meetings, dating to last season.

That’s some serious pushing around.

“Personally, I see it,” said Cody Asche, responding to a question about the Mets’ recent dominance of the Phillies. “I see the discrepancy in the win-loss record.

“Do I have an explanation? No. Do I wish it was different? Yeah. If we are going to make moves, we have to take care of the teams in our division, so we definitely have to play better against the Mets.”

The Phillies did a lot of things poorly in this series. Their defense was sloppy at times. They couldn’t bunt. Manager Ryne Sandberg made some questionable moves. The starting pitching was tagged for 19 hits and 10 runs over 10 2/3 innings in the final two games.

Most haunting was the atrocious work of the hitters with men in scoring position. The Phils went 3 for 27 with runners in scoring position in the series. They are 11 for 69 (.159) in those situations for the season.

Sandberg always talks about the importance of having base runners. The Phillies had plenty of them on Wednesday night. In fact, they had runners in scoring position in seven of nine innings, yet scored just one run and left 11 men on base because they were an unsightly 2 for 16 with runners in scoring position.

“That’s the first thing you ask for, base runners and opportunities,” Sandberg said. “We had 11 men left on base. We couldn’t come up with a drive to put up a crooked number. We had the opportunities and could not do it, just the one run in the first.”

That run came after a triple by Odubel Herrera, who batted leadoff and had three extra-base hits. Asche also had three hits and is now 12 for 24 on the season. This is a “developmental” season to use general manager Ruben Amaro Jr.’s word, so the performance of young players Herrera and Asche was promising.

But guys like Papelbon are itchy to win. The Phillies have lost four in a row and The Horse has been relegated to being a bullpen spectator.

Jerome Williams started for the Phillies and allowed 10 hits, including two homers, in five innings. Meanwhile, Jon Niese, bobbed and weaved his way through 6 1/3 innings. He allowed nine hits, but just one run.

The Mets have serious talent in their rotation. Before Niese, the Phillies were beaten by Harvey and Jacob deGrom in the series. Both those guys have Cy Young potential.

Now it’s on to Washington and four more top pitchers — Doug Fister, Max Scherzer, Jordan Zimmermann and Stephen Strasburg.

“That’s a challenge for us, so obviously we have to do things better on the offensive side of things,” Sandberg said.

“Don’t press, keep grinding and have good at-bats,” Asche said. “The law of averages has to take over sometime. The hits are going to come.”

They came Wednesday night, but the runs didn’t follow and the Phillies, much to Jonathan Papelbon’s chagrin, were tormented by the Mets once again.