Tag: Clint Frazier

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Indians agree to terms with first-round pick Clint Frazier


Jim Callis of Baseball America reports that the Indians have agreed to terms with first-round pick Clint Frazier.

Frazier, a high school outfielder out of Georgia, was selected fifth overall in last week’s First-Year Player Draft. He’s set to receive a $3.5 million bonus, which is a little under MLB’s assigned value of $3.787 million for the pick. So the Indians can now use the savings to secure some of their other draft picks.

Frazier confirmed news of the signing on his Twitter account last night.


With his bat speed and power potential from the right side of the plate, Frazier was considered by many to be the top high school bat in this year’s draft class. He’s obviously a long way from making an impact in Cleveland, but some think he has a chance to stick in center field.

2013 MLB Draft: Picks 6-10 – The Marlins jump on Colin Moran

Colin Moran

Marlins selected third baseman Colin Moran from the University of North Carolina with the sixth overall pick.
One rumor last week was that the Astros might take Moran first overall in order to save some money. The Marlins should consider themselves lucky to get him here. Moran, the nephew of former No. 1 overall draft pick B.J. Surhoff, should last at third base, and he’s got a great approach that could make him a No. 2 hitter in the majors. The big issue is whether he’ll turn into more than a 10- or 15-homer guy.

Red Sox picked high school left-hander Trey Ball with the seventh pick in the draft.
The Red Sox were typically linked to outfielders Austin Meadows and Clint Frazier in this spot, and Meadows was out there for them. Instead, they went with a 6-foot-6 left-hander with big-time upside. Ball was also viewed as a first-round prospect as an outfielder, but the Red Sox drafted him for his talent on the mound. Ball throws in the low-90s now and could add velocity. He’s a high risk kind of talent, but as rarely as the Red Sox get to pick up here — they hadn’t drafted in the top 10 since selecting Trot Nixon seventh overall in 1993 — it’s hard to blame them for shooting for the moon.

Royals selected Stephen F. Austin shortstop Hunter Dozier eighth overall.
This will be the laughing stock pick of the top 10, as most saw Dozier as a second-round talent. The Royals can probably sign him at a discount, which could pay off later if some nice prospects slip, but that’d be a silly motivation when there were legitimate top-10 talents left on the board. Dozier isn’t expected to stay at shortstop, but the Royals will likely play him there initially. He has pretty good power, and he’ll need it, since he figures to end up at third.

Pirates grabbed high school outfielder Austin Meadows with the ninth pick in the draft.
Meadows was projected to go as high as fifth and most didn’t see him lasting past the Red Sox with the seventh pick. He probably won’t last in center, and that’s especially a given with Andrew McCutchen now ahead of him. But he should prove to be quite an asset defensively in right field, and he possesses big-time power potential. He’s a high risk kind of guy, but he’s also one with the ability to end up as the best player from this year’s draft.

Blue Jays picked right-hander Phil Bickford with the 10th pick.
The Blue Jays usually go high school, just as they did here. They may well have preferred Trey Ball, but the Red Sox got to him first. Bickford, who doesn’t turn 18 until next month, already touches the mid-90s with his fastball, and both his slider and changeup could turn into plus pitches later.

2013 MLB Draft: Picks 2-5 – Cubs take third baseman Kris Bryant 2nd overall

Kris Bryant

Cubs picked University of San Diego third baseman Kris Bryant with the second overall pick.
Bryant, a 6-foot-5 right-handed bat, was considered the best power hitter from the college ranks, smashing 31 homers to go along with a .329/.493/.820 line for San Diego this year. The question with him is defense, as some wonder if he’ll be able to stay at third base. With little organization depth at the position, the Cubs will have good reason to leave him at the hot corner for now.

Rockies picked University of Oklahoma RHP Jonathan Gray with the third pick.
There was some speculation that Gray would fall after testing positive for Adderall, but the Rockies couldn’t pass on a big-time arm capable of moving quickly. Gray throws a bit harder than Mark Appel, reaching the upper 90s, but his changeup is a mediocre third pitch that needs some work. He’s not quite as polished as Appel, but he could still reach the majors in 2014. Hopefully, he’ll work out better than the last two college right-handers the Rockies picked in the top 10: Casey Weathers (8th overall, 2007) and Greg Reynolds (2nd overall, 2006).

Twins selected high school RHP Kohl Stewart fourth overall in the draft.
Stewart, widely regarded as the top high school pitcher in the class, is also a find quarterback prospect, having committed to Texas A&M. Still, everyone seems to expect that he’ll sign. Stewart is a fastball-slider pitcher capable of throwing in the mid-90s. He joins an impressive stable of young Twins arms that includes offseason acquisitions Alex Meyer and Trevor May, along with former draft picks Kyle Gibson and Jose Berrios.

Indians picked high school outfielder Clint Frazier fifth overall.
A bit of a surprise here, but the Indians were probably hoping one of the top three would slip. Frazier isn’t a big guy, standing 6-foot-1 and weighing 190, but teams still think he’ll hit for power with wood bats. He also gets rave reviews for makeup. As a high school bat, he doesn’t figure to move quickly.

Mark Appel is the top-ranked player in the draft … again

Mark Appel

Baseball America just released its pre-season ranking of the top-50 players for this year’s draft and Stanford right-hander Mark Appel tops the list.

Of course, Appel topped the list last year too and leading up to the draft many people expected him to go No. 1 to the Astros, but then Houston passed and he fell all the way to Pittsburgh at No. 8.

Appel chose not to sign and headed back to Stanford for his senior season, but guess which team picks No. 1 again this year? Houston. If they didn’t want him last year it seems unlikely that the Astros would want him there this year, although in general it’s considered a weak class of prospects and Appel no longer has much negotiating leverage.

The rest of Baseball America‘s top five are Indiana State left-hander Sean Manaea, Georgia high school outfielders Austin Meadows and Clint Frazier, and Arkansas right-hander Ryne Stanek.