Tag: Clayton Mortensen

Joel Hanrahan Getty

Joel Hanrahan exits game with injury


The Red Sox have already lost one closer to the disabled list. They lost another tonight as Joel Hanrahan exited tonight’s game against the Twins after allowing a game-tying solo home run to Brian Dozier that reset the game at five apiece. Hanrahan got to 1-1 against his final batter, Josh Willingham, before throwing three straight balls. He was taken out and replaced by Clayton Mortensen.

On Twitter, Alex Speier speculated on various options, calling Koji Uehara “a good primary closing option” and suggests the Red Sox could also recall Alfredo Aceves.

Hanrahan entered the night with a 9.45 ERA in 6.2 innings. The home run to Dozier was the fourth he has allowed on the season. Comparatively, he allowed eight in 59.2 innings last year.

Red Sox place Stephen Drew on concussion DL, option Daniel Bard to Double-A

stephen drew getty

Boston made a pair of key roster moves, placing shortstop Stephen Drew on the seven-day disabled list for concussions and optioning right-hander Daniel Bard to Double-A.

Drew hasn’t played since being hit on the helmet by a pitch on March 7, struggling with dizziness and other post-concussion symptoms. Jose Iglesias will step in as the Opening Day shortstop.

Bard’s nightmare 2012 season has continued this spring with seven runs allowed in eight innings, although he has managed 10 strikeouts compared to four walks. He actually looked good early in camp, but has really struggled recently. Clayton Mortensen is expected to take the final spot in the Red Sox’s bullpen as they wait for Bard to show signs of being the dominant setup man from 2009-2011. Bard hasn’t pitched at Double-A since 2008, when he threw 50 innings with a 1.99 ERA and 64 strikeouts.

Red Sox likely to head north without Daniel Bard

Daniel Bard

ESPN Boston’s Gordon Edes thinks the Red Sox open the season with right-hander Daniel Bard with Triple-A Pawtucket:

How Farrell plans to deploy his bullpen at the start of the season is coming into sharper focus. First, even though he says the team has yet to make a decision regarding Daniel Bard, all signs point to Bard opening the season in Pawtucket, which puts Clayton Mortensen on the club.

Between ten starts and seven relief appearances in the big leagues last year, Bard finished with a 6.22 ERA with a significantly-reduced ability to miss bats and a ballooning walk rate. He wasn’t much better in the 32 innings with Pawtucket in the middle of 2012 either, as he posted a 7.03 ERA and a 32-to-29 strikeout-to-walk ratio there. Bard’s star has fallen since being a two-time top-100 prospect as ranked by Baseball America going into the 2007 and 2009 seasons.

Report: Red Sox sign Koji Uehara to one-year, $4.25 million deal

Koji Uehara

Gerry Fraley of the Dallas Morning News reports that the Red Sox and setup man Koji Uehara have agreed to a one-year deal, pending a physical.

FOXSports.com’s Jon Morosi says the contract has a $4.25 million base salary.

One imagines Uehara could have held out for a multiyear deal, given his career 2.89 ERA and 0.92 WHIP since arriving in the U.S. four years ago. However, he has dealt with arm problems. Last season, he had a 1.75 ERA and a ridiculous 43/3 K/BB ratio in 36 innings for Texas.

Uehara joins a Boston pen also set to include Andrew Bailey, Mark Melancon, Alfredo Aceves and Craig Breslow, with Junichi Tazawa, Daniel Bard, Clayton Mortensen, Andrew Miller and Franklin Morales (if he’s not in the rotation) also in the mix. It’s possible his addition might force his countryman, Tazawa, out of the mix. Bard is out of options, so the Red Sox will have to keep him in the majors or trade him.

Updated: Where would the Red Sox go minus Gonzalez, Crawford, Beckett?

Josh Beckett, Adrian Gonzalez

The deal isn’t yet official, but it looks like Adrian Gonzalez, Carl Crawford, Josh Beckett and Nick Punto are all Los Angeles bound in exchange for four minimum-salaried players and  free-agent-to-be James Loney. That would cut $58.25 million in 2013 salaries from Boston’s payroll and leave the Red Sox committed to only four players for next season:

John Lackey: $15.25 million
Dustin Pedroia: $10 million
Jon Lester: $11.625 million
Clay Buchholz: $5.5 million

That’s just $42.375 million in commitments. Here are my guesses for what the arbitration-eligible players would make, with Ryan Sweeney getting non-tendered:

Jacoby Ellsbury: $10 million
Jarrod Saltalamacchia: $5 million
Andrew Bailey: $4.5 million
Alfredo Aceves: $2.4 million
Mike Aviles: $2.2 million
Craig Breslow: $2.2 million
Daniel Bard: $1.8 million
Franklin Morales: $1.8 million
Andrew Miller: $1.6 million
Rich Hill: $1 million

That’s another $32.5 million. Throw in the minimum salaries of the new acquisitions and guys like Will Middlebrooks, Felix Doubront and Mark Melancon and the Red Sox are essentially at $80 million with big question marks at first base, left field, right field and DH.

Theoretically, the Red Sox would already have five starters in Lester, Buchholz, Lackey, Doubront and Morales. Rubby De La Rosa should be in the picture as well. However, in reality, they’d surely want a veteran to plug in at the top there. The bullpen should is pretty well stocked, though, with Bailey, Aceves, Bard, Melancon, Breslow, Morales, Junichi Tazawa, Clayton Mortensen, Pedro Beato and Hill all in the mix.

I doubt the Red Sox would want to tear things down any further this winter. They could make a strong effort to bring back David Ortiz to DH. First base would be a problem; aside from Nick Swisher, who will also be looked at as an outfielder, there won’t be much available in free agency. Ironically, the best option would be Kevin Youkilis. The Red Sox would probably have to go the trade route there.

With so much financial flexibility, the Red Sox would have to be viewed as big players for all of the top free agents this winter. It’s a weak crop, but names like Josh Hamilton, Zack Greinke, B.J. Upton, Mike Napoli and Stephen Drew are available. They can offer Ellsbury a Crawford-like deal to prevent him from becoming a free agency after 2013.

Even if the Red Sox do land a Hamilton or Greinke, they’ll enter a season as underdogs for the first time in a long time. But that might not be such a bad thing. There’s still going to be plenty of talent around and money available for bold moves.