Tag: Cincinnati Reds

Roberto Kelly

And That Happened: Wednesday’s scores and highlights


source: AP

Giants 3, Dodgers 2: Joe Panik hit a walkoff sacrifice fly which scored Gregor Blanco. But dudes, Blanco should’ve been called out just before that when he “stopped” at third base on Brandon Belt’s single. UPDATE: OK, I’ve re-read the rule a couple of times and watched the replay a couple of times, and my view of this now is that, despite the contact, Blanco should not have been called out because third base coach Roberto Kelly did not “physically assist” Blanco in getting back to the bag. Read the whole justification and watch the video of the play here. Anyway, this was a big cluster and people will be, quite understandably, arguing about it for a while.

Mets 3, Braves 2: The Mets will never lose again. Of this I am almost certain. That’s ten straight. Lucas Duda hit a go-ahead single in the eighth inning. Wilmer Flores of all friggin’ people hit a homer and drove in another run on a single. He has three on the year, actually. As for the Braves, it’s amazing how fast a brief hot start is forgotten and the expectations everyone has for you takes hold. Personally I was spared this spectacle as I went to go see The Mountain Goats in concert last night. There wasn’t much about baseball there — a lot about wrestling — but they did play one song that all Braves fans should keep at the ready between now and the first week of October:

Pirates 4, Cubs 3: The most remarkable thing about this game other than the facts that (a) it snowed a bit; and (b) Addison Russell got his first big league hit was the fact that the Pirates used Tony Watson for a two-inning save. And that itself wasn’t the most remarkable part. Clint Hurdle’s quote about it was:

“It wasn’t the plan to use Tony that long but it was a gritty performance on his part”

Rich Gossage just rolled over in his grave. And you may say “hey, Craig, Gossage isn’t dead.” He wasn’t, but he was watching the post-game presser, heard Hurdle say that and immediately died, so now he is and he’s rolling over because he still can’t even. Dan Quisenberry is dead, but he’s not rolling. He got friggin’ sick of all of that rolling and this point he just lies there, disgusted at what passes for gritty these days.

Twins 3, Royals 0: Mike Pelfrey pitched seven scoreless innings to notch his first win since 2013. The Twins scored all three runs in the first inning. Which is a good argument against time machines, really. If we had them someone, somewhere would’ve zapped ahead a couple of hours to see the outcome here, they would’ve texted someone at the ballpark about it, word would’ve spread and then there’d be no one there buying beer and hot dogs and crap. And that’s the real thing about time travel no one ever talks about. Sure, we hear all about, like, going back in time and killing your enemy’s grandfather so your enemy is never born or going forward and getting all of the box scores for the next decade, coming back and growing rich on your gambling “skill,” but the economic dislocation would be the biggest impact. That and everyone losing their ambition and will to live life going forward under the delusion that we can make things happen and otherwise affect some sort of positive change on this doomed world. Time machines would sap us of this fiction. We’d all die in our beds, as unmotivated to carry on as a bunch of flops in some 19th century opium den.

White Sox 6, Indians 0: Jeff Samardzija tossed six shutout innings, the bullpen kept it up for three more and Jose Abreu homered, doubled and drove in three. That is pretty much the Platonic Ideal of a Chicago White Sox win in 2015. They have, like, animated video simulations of this playing on monitors and glossy brochures in this freely available in the lobby of the White Sox offices for everyone to see.

Cardinals 7, Nationals 5: St. Louis jumped out to a 5-0 lead, let the Nats jump back to 5-5 and then pulled away in the eighth on a Kolten Wong double and added some insurance in the ninth because the Nats just don’t have a very good bullpen. Wong’s two-run homer was part of that jumping out part earlier and he ended up 3-for-4 on the night.

Marlins 6, Phillies 1: The Fish end their five-game losing streak. The Phillies are gonna end a lot of losing streaks this year, I reckon. Five unearned runs charged to the Phillies because, woof.

Blue Jays 4, Orioles 2: Homers from Devon Travis and Justin Smoak. Travis has four homers on the year and they’re gonna take the Rookie of the Year line off the board at whatever degenerate casinos allow degenerate gamblers to bet on stuff like “who will win Rookie of the Year.” Jays pitcher Aaron Sanchez walked seven guys. If you, like the Orioles here, walk seven times and lose, man, I can’t help you.

Yankees 13, Tigers 4: Six runs off David Price in the first inning ended this one before it began. Which is a shame given how cold it was — snowed here too — but the rules say you gotta play nine unless it rains. And Price sat in the dugout for all nine, even after he got pulled:

Price said he stayed in the dugout after being pulled, instead of retreating to the warmth of the Detroit clubhouse.

“You throw the ball as bad as I did and you give up more runs than you get outs, you don’t deserve to come up here,” Price said. “That’s why I stayed out there.”

Your sacrifice is bold and brave, good sir knight. Coffee is for closers, etc.

Rays 7, Red Sox 5: Tampa Bay was down 5-1 heading into the bottom of the sixth when Jake Elmore — who just got called up before the game — homered and Brandon Guyer hit a two-run, pinch-hit single in a four-run sixth inning. The Rays break a four-game losing streak. Dustin Pedroia and David Ortiz homered in winning efforts in a losing cause.

Reds 2, Brewers 1: Billy Hamilton came home from third on a wild pitch with two outs in the ninth, sending the Brewers to their seventh straight loss. Maybe they need to listed to that Mountain Goats song. And make sure time machines aren’t invented. As for the Reds, that’s three straight wins since Bryan Price’s F-bomb dropping rant. One or two more of these and some jerk is gonna write the “Price’s rant motivated the Reds” column. I mean, there’s a non-zero chance I’m that jerk, but that won’t make such a column any less dumb.

Rockies 5, Padres 4: Corey Dickerson had two homers, with his second one serving to tie the game in the eighth inning. Then, in the ninth, pinch-hitter Daniel Descalso smacked an RBI single for the walkoff. Both Dickerson and Nolan Arenado were out of the game on Tuesday due to various ailments. Both came back last night and came up big. Dickerson for his bombs, Arenado for some of his patented stellar defense, an RBI double and his run scoring on Descalso’s walkoff single.

Diamondbacks 8, Rangers 5: Archie Bradley walked five in the first three innings of work, including one walk with the bases loaded. That normally doesn’t bode well for your evening, but he gutted it out, lasted six innings allowing that lone runs and got the win. Four double plays by the Dbacks’ D helped, as did Chris Owings homering and hitting an RBI single.

Athletics 9, Angels 2: A pitcher’s duel until the seventh when the A’s scored five. They added three more in the eighth. As for the duel part, Sonny Gray allowed one run over seven innings, besting Jered Weaver who allowed one run in six before handing it over to the Angels bullpen to poo all over.

Mariners 3, Astros 2: Houston loaded the bases with two outs in the eighth and put runners on the corners with one out in the ninth, both times coming away with zero runs. That’s how you lose games, folks. J.A. Happ allowed two runs in seven and a third in a much-needed strong start for the Mariners.

And That Happened: Tuesday’s scores and highlights

Jose Bautista

I haven’t added them all up nor have I researched the matter, but if I just had to guess, with my gut, based on doing these recaps every morning, I’d guess that more runs were scored last night than any night with 15 ballgames going in, say, a year. Maybe a year and a half. Could be wrong — could be way wrong — but it sort of feels like it.

I’d also say that, based on the couple of game stories I read, someone fired the cliche machine up to 11. But hey, it’s hard to be creative on a Tuesday night. Anyway:

Blue Jays 13, Orioles 6: So Bud Norris isn’t having a great time. Rocked for nine runs in two and a third, which follows on two previous not great outings, including an eight-run bleed-out against the Orioles in his first start of the year. On the year: twenty earned runs on 18 hits in ten and a third. In the offseason the O’s were trying to deal Ubaldo Jimenez but no one wanted him so they thought about trading Bud Norris instead. Always go with your second instinct, I guess. Two homers for Edwin Encarnacion. Oh, and Jose Bautista hit his 250th career homer that (a) came after O’s pitcher Jason Garcia nearly hit him, so (b) Bautista admired the shot, stared down Norris and then flipped his bat, causing the O’s to get all feisty and mad. Adam Jones even said, unironically, that Bautista needs to “respect the game” afterward.

Phillies 7, Marlins 3: The Phillies actually had an offense last night, led by Ryan Howard, who hit a go-ahead two-run homer in the sixth. Howard was 2-for-3 with a walk, in fact. So I guess it just so happens that our friend Ryan here was only MOSTLY dead. And, as we all know, there’s a big difference between mostly dead and all dead. Mostly dead is slightly alive. With all dead, well, with all dead there’s usually only one thing you can do: eat $50 million of his contract and ship him to the American League.

Royals 6, Twins 5: Mike Moustakas hit a two-run homer and drove in the go-ahead run with a single in the eighth inning. After the game, Ned Yost was asked about how he stuck with Moustakas over the past couple of years despite all of his slumps:

“You almost want to stand up on this table and yell, `I told you so!” Yost said, flashing a wry grin. “But I’m not. I’m not an I-told-you-so kind of guy.”

Well, you just told-us-so, Ned, so you kind of are.

Angels 14, Athletics 1: Johnny Giavotella drove in four and Kole Calhoun had four hits, including a three-run homer. After the game, Giavotella said this:

“From day one in spring training, this team has welcomed me with open arms. They believe in me, and it’s great to have guys that rally around you and root for you”

Somewhere, in exile, Josh Hamilton sheds a single tear as mournful music plays.

Astros 6, Mariners 3: I love the intro to this AP gamer:

Collin McHugh continued to linger, never getting knocked around enough to where his night needed to end . . .

I feel like that was a lyrical passage to at least six songs in the mid-90s.

Jose Altuve hit a go-ahead three-run double on an 0-2 pitch in the eighth inning. The Astros are 8-6 and sit atop the AL West, by the way.

Cubs 9, Pirates 8: Addison Russell made his big league debut and finished 0-for-5 with three strikeouts. But that’s OK, because (a) the Cubs won anyway; and (b) Kris Bryant made a debut that was just as poopy on Friday and all he’s done since then is knock the friggin cover off the ball and get on base like crazy. Starlin Castro chipped in as well, going 3-for-5 with a homer and four driven in.

Rangers 7, Diamondbacks 1: Prince Fielder homered, doubled and drove in three. Asked what he’s doing, he said he is “just looking for a pitch [he] can drive.” I can’t believe he’d reveal such top secret information like that. Opposing teams read these game stories, you know. Fielder on the year: .386/.435/.509 with nine driven in. Guess he was just mostly dead too.

Giants 6, Dodgers 2: The third only mostly dead performance of the night, with Tim Lincecum allowing only one run in six innings to snag the win. He also provided another great cliche on the night when he revealed that his secret was “making good pitches.” Huh. “So, kids: if you’re a young pitcher out there, make good pitches. Not bad ones. That’s a tip from your old friend, Tim,” Lincecum did not add.

Reds 16, Brewers 10: Two grand slams for the Reds — Jay Bruce and Todd Frazier — and two homers from Zack Cozart powered up the Reds. Elian Herrera hit a grand slam for the Brewers and drove in five overall. RIP all the pitchers in this game. The Reds have scored 22 in two games against Milwaukee. Welcome back to 1999.

Nationals 2, Cardinals 1: One of the few pitchers duels of the night. And should’ve been lower scoring than it was, except Drew Storen blew the save in a 1-0 game in the ninth. Yunel Escobar’s walkoff homer in the 10th, however, saved his bacon.

Yankees 5, Tigers 2: Nathan Eovaldi allowed one run on eight hits and a walk while pitching into the eighth inning. The Yankees turned four double plays behind him. Chris Young and Stephen Drew hit solo homers in the seventh.

Mets 7, Braves 1: Trevor Cahill didn’t throw strikes, got behind in counts and the Mets sat back waiting for his get-me-over pitches, which they smacked all over the dang place. This is not a repeat from, like, every Trevor Cahill start of the past couple of years. Catcher Kevin Plawecki made his debut, filling in for the injured Travis d’Arnaud. He got two hits, scored twice and threw out a runner trying to advance. That’s nine wins in a row for the Mets.

Red Sox 1, Rays 0: Wade Miley and four relievers combined on the shutout. The game’s only run came on a throwing error that should’ve been an inning-ending double play. Mookie Betts’ hard slide helped throw second baseman Ryan Brett off balance, however.

Indians 6, White Sox 2: Carlos Carrasco made his first start since being hit in the face by a comebacker. He seemed just dandy, striking out eight in five innings on a cold night. The pen took over from there, allowing only one run in four innings of work. In all, Indians pitchers struck out 15 White Sox.

Padres 7, Rockies 6: Derek Norris hit a tiebreaking, two-run double in the eighth to help the Padres complete a come-from-behind victory. Clint Barmes homered and Wil Myers had three hits and the Padres have won six of seven. They’re 10-5 overall and six of those wins have been come-from-behind jobs.

How does releasing the Reds’ lineup help the Reds?


I’ve been waiting for this tweet from the moment all that chaos erupted last night:

First response I saw:

Too soon, man. Too soon.

What Bryan Price’s rant was really all about

Getty Bryan Price

Hearing the manager of a major league baseball team drop 77 f-bombs in five minutes is pretty hilarious. And if you were on Twitter last night when the Bryan Price rant broke, you were party to all manner of great jokes about Price’s unhinged moment. But now that the dust and excrement (both bovine and equine) has settled, let us note that Price’s rant was more telling than it was profane.

Telling in that it shows that the manager of a major league baseball team thinks the media works for him and is outraged that it’s not doing what he wants it to do.

Let’s scrub the hilarious profanity and slightly edit for clarity and see what Price is really saying:

I don’t get why it’s got to be this way. Has it always been this way where the media just reports everything? It’s nobody’s business. It’s certainly not the opponent’s business . . . The media’s job is not to sniff out everything about the Reds and put it out there for everyone to hear. It’s not your job. I’ve been candid with you. I tell you what is going on with the team, and you write about it? I have to read tweets about the things I told you? How does that benefit the Reds? It doesn’t benefit us. We try to go out there and win games and I have to deal with you guys telling everyone what players we have available?

I don’t think the media needs to know everything. How do the Reds benefit from the opponent knowing we don’t have Devin Mesoraco? How do we benefit from that? They benefit from it. I just want to know how we benefit from that. Can you answer that? How is that good for the Reds?

Setting aside the fact that Price does not, apparently, realize that it is the media’s job to tell readers and viewers what on-the-record, relevant information it learns, I am struck by the larger framing of Price’s rant: that it’s the media’s job to do things to benefit the Reds somehow. To do their bidding or, at the very least, to not say anything harmful.

It’s possible to conclude that this is just an instance of a manager who is overwhelmed, out of his depth and starting to lose his composure in a season that has started poorly and could only get worse. But it’s also possible — and I suspect probable — that Price’s mindset here is informed by the way professional sports teams, large businesses and governments approach media these days. As something to be manipulated. A mere outgrowth of public relations.

Price, unlike a lot of managers, was not a major league player, and in his playing career didn’t likely have to deal with the media too much. Same goes for his time as a pitching coach, as pitching coaches don’t answer to the press every single night. He was likely in something of a bubble for many years and did not have to really become conversant with the media game until the 2014 season.

And what’s the media landscape like in 2014? Way different than it was when, say, Dusty Baker learned the media ropes. Teams have sophisticated p.r. teams. Heck, they have their own media. As we’ve noted several times around these parts, teams and leagues can break their own news, bypassing the independent news media that cover them. Sports teams aren’t just news sources, they’re in the news business, too, with their own radio, TV and Internet operations. And, to the extent there is still an independent media around, they are far more tightly controlled by that p.r. staff, with less access than they used to have. And some even have taken to self-censoring to some degree, avoiding being critical in ways that their predecessors may have been in the interest of maintaining good relationships and access. A significant chunk of the media is, in many ways, now either part of the organization or has been cowed by the organization.

Throw a new manager into that mix — especially one in a relatively small media market, not used to dealing with a dozen hungry reporters covering his club — and it’s not hard to imagine a situation in which, at least for one evening, he forgets that the media doesn’t work for him and his team. That it isn’t the job of the annoying people who show up in his office after a game to do his bidding. To be offended when, heaven forbid, some piece of information he freely tells them isn’t vetted by a couple of p.r. people before being released to the public.

For the most part, this new media environment is desirable for teams and other businesses that exploit it. And governments too, it should be noted. They get greater control of the message and less criticism. It’s quite a good deal. But, occasionally, this arrangement creates issues for the newsmakers. Issues like one of their own forgetting that, while they can go a long way toward shaping their own reality, they can’t go all the way. At least not yet.

And That Happened: Monday’s scores and highlights


[I slept late, so I’m letting Reds manager Brian Price do the first recap]

Reds 6, Brewers 1: Anthony Desclafani’s shut down every f****** Brewer he faced, it f****** seemed, tossing eight f****** shutout innings.  He allowed only two f****** hits and now has a f****** scoreless innings streak of fifteen f****** innings. Zach Cosart hit a three run homer on a pitch from Wily Peralta that was, to be candid with you, a vulgar term for feces (both bovine and equine).

White Sox 4, Indians 3: Down 3-0 heading into the bottom of the ninth, the White Sox had to face Cody Allen. Not a problem.

wild pitch
two-run double
RBI single
RBI single

I didn’t see Terry Francona’s postgame comments, but he’d be excused if he let Brian Price draft his remarks for him. What a f****** day for Ohio baseball.

Red Sox 7, Orioles 1: It was a day not fit for man nor beast in Boston, but it was Patriot’s Day, and that’s a big deal so they were gonna get this game in regardless, it seemed. As it was, the Orioles made three errors that led to five unearned Red Sox runs. Not that the unearned runs weren’t, as it were, earned by O’s pitcher Wei-Yin Chen: he walked four dudes and made an error in the Sox’ big inning. After that it was all about dodging raindrops and waiting for the umps to call the game. Which they did in the seventh.

Tigers 2, Yankees 1: Down 1-0, J.D. Martinez and Yoenis Cespedes hit back-to-back RBI singles in the seventh to put the Tigers over. A nice outing from CC Sabathia — encouraging and efficient, even in a loss — but a better one from Alfredo Simon. The Tigers have been getting great pitching from Simon, Shane Greene and David Price.

Cubs 5, Pirates 2: Kris Bryant was 3-for-4 with three RBI, including this double plus (and doubleplus) error and misplay that I’m choosing to count as a home run, because Little League is the best. Bryant is 6-for-14 with a double and four RBI in the four games he’s played since being called up.

Royals 7, Twins 1: Edinson Volquez allowed five hits and a walk while striking out five in seven innings, allowing only one run. Kyle Gibson allowed four runs — three earned — in five innings and didn’t strike out a single batter. Indeed, he’s struck out only 5.2 batters per nine innings in his career, which is insanely bad in this strikeout-happy era.

Padres 14, Rockies 3: Ah, it’s great to be back in Denver. The Padres unleashed a 17-hit attack in which they put up nine runs in the first two innings. Matt Kemp had three hits and four RBI. Odrismar Despaigne allowed only two runs in six and two-thirds and got his first career hit. After the game, he revealed that his fellow Padres pitchers told him they’d take him out shopping for new clothes today if he got a hit in Coors Field, so good for him. The Padres have won 5 of 6.

Athletics 6, Angels 3Stephen Vogt hit a three-run homer and Dan Otero pitched four shutout innings in relief after starter Kendall Graveman couldn’t get it together in three frustrating innings.

Astros 7, Mariners 5: Luis Valbuena is on fire. He hit two homers — solo shots in the first and eighth, giving the Astros the lead both times — and has five over his past seven games. Six of the Astros’ nine hits were for extra bases.