Tag: Cincinnati Reds

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Video: Joey Votto ejected, bumps umpire


Joey Votto is probably facing a suspension for this scene Wednesday at Pittsburgh’s PNC Park …

The initial ejection seemed a little unwarranted — how many other players spike their equipment after striking out? — but that’s no excuse to make contact with an umpire. You can see in the video that Votto also exchanged some words with Pirates starter Gerrit Cole. “You pitch, I hit,” was the PG-rated part.

And That Happened: Tuesday’s scores and highlights

Carlos Perez

Angels 5, Mariners 4: Have yourself a major league debut, Carlos Perez:


The 24-year-old catcher singled in his big league debut and then led off the ninth with this shot to win it for the Angels. He’s the first player to hit a walkoff homer in his debut since Miguel Cabrera did it in 2003. Not bad company.

Marlins 2, Nationals 1: Mat Latos and four relievers combined on a three-hitter. Stephen Strasburg left the game early for Washington with a pinch in his shoulder blades which his manager said has been bugging him lately. Matt Williams said after the game that “we’ll have to have the chiropractor look at him.” After that I suppose they’ll give him a Balsam Specific, some Smeckler’s Powder and, while they’re burning money, a Curative Galvanic Belt too. All of which is way better than what they did back when Williams himself played and guys were bled by leeches to be have him rid of all of their bad humours.

Red Sox 2, Rays 0: The Red Sox had only five hits, but two of them were Mookie Betts homers. Given that Rick Porcello tossed eight shutout innings, that was plenty. Check out the 1975 throwbacks the Sox wore:


They don’t look that great on Betts because he is neither (a) fat; nor (b) wearing a pullover that is a size too small, which was the style in the mid-70s. Plus, I seriously doubt he has big, blown-dry hair under that cap and almost certainly doesn’t smoke. Meanwhile, some guy whose heyday was 1975 is complaining about how today’s athletes can’t compare to the guys 40 years ago.

Braves 9, Phillies 0: Shelby Miller needed only 99 pitches to shut out the Phillies. Like, a real honest-to-goodness nine-inning shutout like the pitchers used to throw 40 years ago back when the athletes were way better than today. Miller, by the way, is 4-1 with a 1.66 and a 31/14 K/BB ratio in 38 innings. I still hated to see Jason Heyward go, but Miller has been a good pickup and by far the most reliable Braves pitcher this year.

Dodgers 8, Brewers 2: Zack Greinke allowed only an unearned run while pitching into the eighth, striking out seven. He also hit a double and flipped is bat like he was Yasiel Puig or something:


All of your “but the NL has better strategy!” arguments will never sway me, but pitchers flipping their bats and strutting around like they own the place after they get hits might.


Reds 7, Pirates 1: Marlon Byrd homered and drove in four. His RBI double put the Reds up by six runs, which led to some serious profundity from manager Bryan Price, who said “it’s a lot easier to manage a game with a six-run lead than a one-run lead or being down a run.” Really makes you think, man.

Yankees 6, Blue Jays 3: Eight shutout innings for Michael Pineda before the bullpen, uncharacteristically, allowed some late damage. Mark Teixeira hit a two run homer and A-Rod doubled in a run. Which, again, is the Yankees’ recipe for success this year: Pineda stepping up and the old guys not looking so old.

Mets 3, Orioles 2: Bartolo Colon became the first pitcher to beat the same opponent while playing for seven different teams. He didn’t get the chance to do it in his half season in Montreal, but you figure he would’ve beaten them there too. And while, yes, Greinke’s double and bat flip — plus Doug Fister getting a pinch-hit single in the Nats game — may bolster the NL rules argument, this still happened last night:


White Sox 5, Tigers 2: Jeff Samardzija allowed only two runs in seven innings, bouncing back from that bad start in an empty Camden Yards. The Chisox’ throwbacks looked better than the Red Sox’ by the way, because these throwbacks are always amazing:


Royals 5, Indians 3: More like Eric Homer, amirite? God, I’m sorry I even said that. That’s bad. But you know damn well someone has called him that at some point. Anyway, Hosmer had a three-run shot. Jason Vargas was touched by a Michael Brantley homer but otherwise cruised for six innings.

Athletics 2, Twins 1: Another strong starting pitching performance on a night with many, this one from Jesse Chavez who allowed only an unearned run in seven and a third. Billys Butler and Burns provided offense, with the former notching two hits and an RBI and the latter adding two hits and a stolen base.

Rangers 7, Astros 1: Probably the least-apt “against his old mates” game ever, as the Astros with Wandy Rodriguez back in 2012 may have been a team of Martians or Daleks or mole people or something compared to the roster they have now. Hell, you can’t even say he pitched against his old laundry, as the uniforms are all different too. Either way, Rodriguez allowed only one run over eight innings against his old club. At least assuming they didn’t reorganize and become some weird LLC or holding company or something since he left.

Cardinals 7, Cubs 4: Matt Carpenter hit a three-run homer and drove in four overall as the Cards win their eighth in a row. Mitch Harris, a 29-year-old rookie and former Navy lieutenant got his first career win. The post-game pie in the face or beer shower doesn’t really compare to shellback initiations, I assume.

Giants 6, Padres 0: Ryan Vogelsong tossed seven innings of three-hit ball and the Giants won their fifth in a row. Third straight by shutout. That’s 20-straight scoreless innings for the Padres, who actually have a bit of lumber at their disposal.

Diamondbacks vs. Rockies: POSTPONED: Rain, feel it on my finger tips
Hear it on my window pane
Your love’s coming down like
Rain, wash away my sorrow
Take away my pain
Your love’s coming down like rain

Yeah, that’s Madonna. Wanna fight about it? Madonna is awesome.

Devin Mesoraco could need hip surgery

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Reds catcher Devin Mesoraco hasn’t started a game since April 11 due to a left hip impingement, but Cincinnati management has opted against placing him on the disabled list because they like having him around as a bench bet. He has zero hits in seven plate appearances in that role, by the way.

Mesoraco is still unable to squat and acknowledged to John Fay of the Cincinnati Enquirer on Tuesday that he might need surgery to get over the injury — a surgery that would come with a four-month rehab.

“We’re doing everything we can to stop that from happening,” said Mesoraco. “We’ve done PRP (platelet-rich plasma injections). We did cortisone. We did lubricating injections. We’re trying to do the best we can to go out and finish the season. It’s frustrating. This isn’t what I expected going into the year.”

Cincinnati is currently seven games back of the first-place Cardinals in the National League Central standings. If that gap grows — and it probably will — the surgery will surely get more serious consideration.

Mesoraco, 26, registered an .893 OPS with 25 home runs and 80 RBI in 114 games last year.

Video: Todd Frazier takes NL lead with ninth home run

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Watch as Reds third baseman Todd Frazier slugs a solo shot on Tuesday in Pittsburgh …

Frazier’s last five hits have been home runs and he has now leapfrogged Dodgers first baseman Adrian Gonzalez for the National League lead in that category (at nine total). Frazier is probably going to be named the National League captain for this year’s Home Run Derby at Great American Ball Park in Cincinnati.

And That Happened: Sunday’s scores and highlights

Evan Gattis

Astros 7, Mariners 6: Make it ten in a row for Houston. Evan Gattis, whose name seems to be leading the Astros’ game stories every day, hit two homers. That’s five homers in six games for him now. As for the Astros, they’re 18-7 and in first place with an astounding seven-game lead. Now, to be sure, it’s early, and to be surer, the AL West has had a history of teams leaping out to big leads only to see them go away over the course of the summer. But this is really somethin’ so far, eh?

Athletics 7, Rangers 1: Sonny Gray walked seven. He also struck out ten. In addition he hit the sportswriter, the public address announcer, the bull mascot twice . . . Stephen Vogt homered twice, driving in four.

Giants 5, Angels 0: The good Tim Lincecum came time-traveling from five or six years ago to grace us all with his presence and provide eight shutout innings. The current Jered Weaver remained, however, allowing five runs on ten hits in five innings. The dude has just fallen off a cliff.

Dodgers 1, Diamondbacks 0: Anderson tossed six shutout innings. So too did Anderson. Neither Brett nor Chase figured in the decision, however, as this one went scoreless for 13 before Yasmani Grandal hit a walkoff homer. The half-inning before Grandal recovered from a wild pitch nicely to throw out a runner trying to score from third. A 13-inning game that ends 1-0 is some serious 1968 noise.

Indians 10, Blue Jays 7: They Jays had a 6-1 lead in the fourth, but unfortunately for them we play nine around these parts. The Indians rallied, featuring a six-run fifth inning. Players said they had a little team meeting in the dugout in the middle of the game and that made a big difference:

“Guys were very forward in being vocal and said what needed to be said,” Kipnis said. “We’re not good enough to play that stupid the way we did in the first couple of innings.”

The worst thing about life is when you find that, very often, people get by with being stupid quite well. They shouldn’t, and they should really be concerned that they are so stupid, but they seem to manage and not care. We’re all Frank Grimes watching Homer Simpson, incredulous that their system works for them and wondering why they don’t have far worse lives than they do, but there they are.

Nationals 1, Mets 0: Losing a 1-0 game feels like a gut-punch. The Mets just lost two in a row. This one thanks to Doug Fister, who pitched shutout ball into the seventh and was backed up by four relievers. The game’s only scoring came on a Ryan Zimmerman RBI single in the first.  The Mets have lost seven of their last ten. The Nats have won five of six. Everyone who wrote “what have we learned?” columns after the first week or two of the season is a moron.

Phillies 6, Marlins 2: Ryan Howard had a triple (!) and an RBI single, helping the Phillies avert the sweep. Before I saw the triple I would’ve guessed “ball kicks off the base of the ball and rolls for a year.” Not quite! Marcel Ozuna took a bad route to it and couldn’t cut it off, and it did kick a bit, but this was a legit, leg-it-out triple to the deepest part of the park. Respect for the big man:

Orioles 4, Rays 2: The “home” team Orioles take two of three from Tampa Bay in St. Petersburg. Adam Jones had four hits, including a tie-breaking single. Afterward he talked about his hitting philosophy:

“I’ve got one simple philosophy … get the heater and try not to miss it,” Jones said.

He’s the Ricky Jay of hitting. He’s going to tell you he’s waiting for your fastball. He’s going to make you throw him your fastball and he’s going to hit your fastball anyway.

Braves 5, Reds 0: Julio Terhran gave up three singles in six shutout innings as the Braves and Reds split. Teheran needed that following three straight starts with too many crooked numbers. Atlanta got to Johnny Cueto. Fredi Gonzalez:

“If you would have told me we’d score five runs against Johnny Cueto, and he would only go six innings, I’m may have stopped and got some Lotto tickets”

People older than, say, 45, say “Lotto tickets.” People younger tend to say “Power Ball” or “Mega Millions.” Older people also say “cash machine” instead of “ATM” a lot. These are the sorts of things I used to make fun of more until it was pointed out to me by someone that I say “Lotto” and “cash machine.” Get off my lawn.

Tigers 6, Royals 4: Anibal Sanchez had a perfect game into the sixth to help give the Tigers the series split. Miguel Cabrera hit a two-run homer and Alex Avila drove in three. The Royals sold out all four games and had their biggest four-day attendance total since their ballpark’s capacity was reduced in a renovation back in 2009.

Twins 13 White Sox 3: Trevor Plouffe smacked a grand slam and drove in five and Brian Dozier had four hits. The Twins are 13-12. Not bad for a club that was supposed to be one of the worst if not the worst team in the majors this year.

Cardinals 3, Pirates 2: Kolten Wong with a 14th inning walkoff homer to give the Cards the sweep. I said earlier that a 1-0 loss is like a gut punch? An extra inning loss is like a gut punch too. The Cards won all three of the games in extras.

Brewers 5, Cubs 3: The Brewers won consecutive games for the first time all year. After the game, they fired Ron Roenicke. I’m guessing the decision to can him was made a few days before and that the timing of it had to do with getting back to Milwaukee after the road trip and stuff, but it’s still weird. It’s also likely to be of little consequence. This club just doesn’t have the horses. They’re going to be down a horse for a bit too, it seems, as Jean Segura left after he was hit on the helmet by a pitch from Pedro Strop, feeling nauseous.

Padres 8, Rockies 6: Lots of homers here, as the Padres and Rockies played a Coors Field Special in Petco Park somehow. The ball just flies better there during the day. Justin Upton, Derek Norris and Jedd Gyorko went yard. Nolan Arenado and Charlie Blackmon each homered twice. Thirty homers were hit in Petco in the nine-game homestand which just ended. Twenty by the opposition, ten by Padres hitters.

Yankees 8, Red Sox 5: The Yankees sweep the Sox and keep their good thing going. It was the first sweep of the Red Sox for New York since 2006. Unless you count two-game series which, really, never count those for they are an abomination unto God. Jacoby Ellsbury reached base four six times, including a walk and being hit by a pitch once. The Yankees have won 13 of 16.