Tag: Chris Davis

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Orioles fan, who is not at all a jackwagon, turns his back for every A-Rod at bat


A lot of people dislike Alex Rodriguez because he draws attention to himself, thinks he’s more important than he is and doesn’t follow rules. Not at all like this dude:

This guy is probably a lot of fun to talk to at the office. I bet he has a lot of opinions and stuff.

I wonder if he pulled this stuff when Orioles shortstop Everth Cabrera, also a Biogenesis All-Star, came to bat last night. Or, for that matter, when Nelson Cruz did last year. Or Chris Davis or, well, you see how this goes.

UPDATE: Adam Kilgore of the Washington Post interviewed him. And, no, he doesn’t turn his back on Orioles PED guys. Why? Because A-Rod is “the worst.” Basically, he comes off about how you’d expect him to come off. Like an attention-seeking blowhard.

Orioles activate Chris Davis from 25-game suspension

chris davis getty

With his 25-game suspension that carried over from last season now completed the Orioles have activated Chris Davis for tonight’s game against the Rays.

In order to hit the 25-game mark Davis was suspended for the Orioles’ final 17 regular season games and seven postseason games, plus the first game of this season.

He was suspended for using Adderall without an MLB-approved exemption, which he had in 2013 and has again for this season but failed to secure for 2014. Tonight he’s in the lineup at designated hitter and batting fifth.

In addition to the suspension Davis is also trying to get his on-field production back on track after he followed up an MVP-caliber 2013 campaign by hitting .196 with 173 strikeouts in 123 games on the way to a 300-point drop in OPS.

2015 Preview: Baltimore Orioles

Buck Showalter

Between now and Opening Day, HardballTalk will take a look at each of baseball’s 30 teams, asking the key questions, the not-so-key questions, and generally breaking down their chances for the 2015 season. Next up: The Baltimore Orioles.

The Big Question: Can the Orioles replace the big bats they lost?

The Orioles had a quiet offseason. Which would be fine for a defending division champ coming off a 96-win season if they hadn’t lost their best hitter and, arguably, their third best hitter in the offseason. Here I’m talking about the DH, Nelson Cruz and their everyday right fielder for nearly a decade, Nick Markakis. OK, calling the 2014 version — let alone the post-surgery 2015 version — of Nick Markakis a “big bat” may be stretching things a bit, but in the two of these guys they lost their two most durable players who were 1-2 in on-base percentage on the club and who combined for 1,388 plate appearances, 54 homers and 158 RBI.

That’s a lot to lose, without a lot brought in to make up for it. The only real addition: Travis Snider. Which is actually pretty OK. Snider is past the point where his once can’t-miss-prospect status matters much, but he did show last year that he can be a solid guy, at least against righties. Not great, but solid, and at age 27 there’s a chance he builds on his nice second half of 2014 and finds a way to put together a nice couple of seasons.

But the real answer to that question is not about who they brought in, but who they get back: Manny Machado, Matt Wieters and, for all practical purposes, Chris Davis.

Machado missed half the season with a knee injury. Wieters missed all but 26 games due to Tommy John surgery. Machado, however, is healthy again and, having already shown he can handle big league pitching at ages 20 and 21, his return to the lineup will be a welcome one. Wieters may start the season a bit late but, assuming no hiccups in his recovery, should be back for most of the year. His arm may be a question mark at the moment but he was hitting the cover off the ball when he went down last year.

Davis may be the most intriguing of the returning triumvirate. He managed 26 homers last season despite a putrid average and OBP, and his suspension for Adderall was the moldy icing on the garbage cake. He claims now that his troubles last year were due to a strained oblique that is now healthy and he has a therapeutic use exemption for the Adderall, which he claims helps his focus. That remains to be seen, but it’s hard to see how he could get much worse than he was in 2014.

So, Cruz and Markakis gone, Snider, Machado, Wieters and an improved Davis in? There are a decent amount of “ifs” in there, but yeah, that’ll do.

What else is going on?

  • While the bounce back candidates are something to wish on, O’s fans had best prepare for a candidate for regression. Steve Pearce was a godsend for the O’s when Machado and, later, Davis went down, hitting .293/.373/.556 with 21 homers in 102 games. You think that’s happening again? Think again. Also maybe think about whether, if Pearce falters, Showalter has the will power to avoid playing Delmon Young more than he should. Young was pretty spiffy last year, but he was also used sparingly. The more Young is used in 2015, the less the O’s plans have gone according to expectations.
  • The rotation remains a strength in 2014. A thousand “can the Orioles win without a true ace” columns were written last year and a thousand more are likely to be written this year, but a team can do just fine without one of those true ace-types as long as they have four or five good pitchers like the O’s have in Chris Tillman, Wei-Yin Chen, Bud Norris, Miguel Gonzalez and Kevin Gausman.
  • Oh, a name was missing from that list, was it? Yes, it was: Ubaldo Jimenez. Nope, last year’s biggest acquisition doesn’t crack this rotation if reasonable expectations hold. But sure, Jimenez could bounce back and be useful. If so, wonderful. Especially in a day and age when pitchers drop like flies. But he doesn’t have to in order for the O’s to be successful, and that’s a nice luxury for everyone who doesn’t have to sign his checks.
  • The Orioles’ bullpen has a lot of moving parts at the moment, including Rule 5 additions and guys without options. But they also have a lot of talent and Buck Showalter has shown that he is the absolute best in the business dealing with the moving parts of a major league bullpen. Really, that’s been the story of this club for the past several years and gives the O’s a big advantage over teams with young, low-experience managers who never had to, you know, learn how to manage bullpens, which is just as much art as it is science, it seems.

Prediction: A lot of uncertainty here, but let us not forget that there’s a lot of talent too. I didn’t even mention Adam Jones above, and he’s pretty great. The defense up the middle is nice. The rotation, as mentioned, is solid. And the O’s have one of the best managers in the game. In a division where everyone else is either down or dealing with some key injuries that should still make them the favorite to win it. First place, AL East.

Orioles to give Chris Davis some playing time in right field during the spring

Chris Davis

Chris Davis is slated to serve as the Orioles’ everyday first baseman in 2015, but manager Buck Showalter wants the slugger to get some playing time in right field, Eduardo A. Encina of the Baltimore Sun reports. Davis hasn’t played in the outfield since 2012.

Davis missed the last few weeks of the regular season when he was suspended 25 games for using amphetamines — Adderall, specifically. He had also missed some time early in the season with a strained oblique. As a result, he finished with only 26 home runs and 72 RBI, a far cry from the league-leading 53 and 138 from 2013.

Davis can become a free agent after the season. There hasn’t been much in the way of progress regarding an extension thus far, though agent Scott Boras expressed optimism back in December in an Encina report.

Chris Davis: “I think there are definitely situations where I need to bunt”

Chris Davis AP

Orioles slugger Chris Davis finished third in the balloting for the American League MVP Award in 2013 after launching 56 home runs and amassing 138 RBI, but he took a major step back last year by batting just .196/.300/.404 over 127 games before he was handed a season-ending 25-game suspension for amphetamine use. While Davis saw his strikeout rate increase by 3.4 percent from 2013, he was also one of the biggest victims of increased defensive shifts around MLB. According to Roch Kubatko of MASNSports.com, Davis wants to be better prepared this year:

“I think there are definitely situations where I need to bunt, and I know there was some frustration last year obviously with my batting average being as low as it was – not only on my part but the fan base and maybe even on some of my teammates’ part – as far as me hitting into the shift,” Davis said earlier this week on the “Hot Stove Show” on 105.7 The Fan.

“First of all, when you’re not swinging the bat well and you’re kind of trying to find it, for me, I want to go up there and have an at-bat. I don’t want to just lay a bunt down. There were times last year when I did lay a bunt down, but for me it’s really a comfort thing. It’s different going out there and working off a machine or even a BP arm and laying balls down the third base line and going into a game and doing it. For me, it was just a comfort thing and I have worked on it this offseason. I’ve probably worked on it more this offseason than I have in the past. If it’s a one-run game, I’m probably not going to lay one down, but there are situations where unselfishly it’s probably the best thing to do. It’s definitely a weapon I can use against other teams.

According to Baseball Reference, Davis had one bunt hit last season. Simply changing your approach to use all fields is easier said than done, so if Davis sees the same extreme infield shifts again in 2015, he’s essentially being offered a free base if he can drop one down the third base line. You probably don’t want him doing that with runners on base, as the Orioles are counting on him to drive in runs, but it’s something that would be interesting to see on occasion. Same goes for other victims of the shift, like Brian McCann and Mark Teixeira of the Yankees. Defensive shifts aren’t going anywhere, despite some brief discussion on the matter last month, so hitters need to think of ways to neutralize it.