Tag: Chicago White Sox

Giancarlo Stanton

Giancarlo Stanton cleared to swing off a tee after surgery


Marlins slugger Giancarlo Stanton has been cleared to swing off a tee one month after hamate bone surgery.

Stanton was initially given a 4-6 week recovery timetable, but manager Dan Jennings declined to give a firm answer to Christina De Nicola of FOX Sports Florida when asked if Stanton was close to coming off the disabled list.

Oh, and despite missing a month of action (and counting) Stanton is still tied for the National League lead with 27 home runs.

Miami is 42-58 and Stanton is a 25-year-old superstar signed to a $325 million contract, so there isn’t much motivation for the Marlins to rush him back. At this point mid-August seems like a best-case scenario.

Why do managers wear uniforms anyway?

Houston Astros v Chicago Cubs

This, from the PostGame, is a good read. And it addresses a topic that, I’d guess, more non-baseball fans ask me than any other question: why do managers wear uniforms?

I always answer “tradition,” and “the rules,” but it seems that’s only half-right. Baseball went on a little fining jag a couple of years ago when guys like Terry Francona and Joe Maddon didn’t wear uniform tops under their little workout shirts and hoodies, but it seems that there is no rule at all specifying that managers wear uniforms.

The idea of a manager not having to wear a uniform seemed more important a few years ago when guys like Tommy Lasorda were squeezing into duds meant for guys 40 years younger and a hundred pounds lighter. But these days the managers are far more handsome and fit than they used to be, so I guess it’s not a thing.

Still: today’s managers need to show that they are truly committed the uniform. Because, compared to one Hall of Fame manager, these guys are dilettantes:

Some managers dress like their players — down to the very last detail. Showalter wears stirrups. Bobby Cox wore a cup and spikes for every game.

“You never see a manager wearing actual cleats … It was hilarious,” says Adam LaRoche who played for Cox while with the Braves from 2004-2006. “It’s just his style. He went from playing right into coaching and managing and never took his cleats off.”

Why on Earth would a manager wear a cup?

And That Happened: Tuesday’s scores and highlights


Yankees 21, Rangers 5: Well this was a ridiculous game. Down 5-0 after one inning, every Yankees fan I know on Twitter was giving up, changing the channel and/or cursing Chris Capuano, who didn’t even make it through that first inning. Then the Yankees put up an 11-spot in the second, capped by a Chris Young grand slam, and never looked back. It was 98 degrees at game time and this one lasted three hours, thirty-eight minutes. Rangers pitchers needed 97 more pitches to get through nine innings than the Yankees pitchers did. The box score looks like a crime scene. I’m gonna nominate this one for the least-fun game of the year in Major League Baseball.

Athletics 2, Dodgers 0: Sonny Gray tossed a three-hit, complete game shutout, striking out nine and lowering his ERA to 2.16. I watched this one. Because of the pace it was the rare west coast start I could see (almost) all of before falling asleep. That’s quite a brag for a 42-year-old guy who wakes up at 5:30 every day.

Orioles 7, Braves 3: Two homers and five driven in for Chris Davis and another crap road performance for Julio Teheran. Dude has a 2.37 ERA at Turner Field and a 7.24 ERA on the road. He must REALLY not like hotels.

Phillies 3, Blue Jays 2: Adam Morgan gave up a leadoff homer and found himself down 2-0 after two, but Philly came back with three in the fifth inning and then Ken Giles closed it out for his first save in the post-Papelbon era. The Phillies are on fire, having won 9 of 10 since the break. If they win out that’s 99 wins and I bet that would take the NL East this year. Just sayin’.

Royals 2, Indians 1: Not gonna say things are going great for the Royals right now, but things are going great for the Royals right now:


White Sox 9, Red Sox 4: Jose Abreu and Geovany Soto homered for Chicago. Soto’s broke the windshield of a car parked in a lot behind the Green Monster. Abreu’s caused this:


If you catch a ball going over the fence, you automatically become a wide receiver and have to maintain possession. Sorry, Mookie, them’s the breaks. In other news, Jeff Samardzija was solid until he ran out of gas in the ninth. Not that it matters much, but Chicago moved into sole possession of third place, a game ahead of the skidding Tigers.

Rays 10, Tigers 2: Did you hear the Tigers are skidding? Because they are. This time even their ace David Price couldn’t help them, with the Rays touching him for five runs in six innings. They touched the pen pretty good too, for five more runs in three, with Neftali Feliz doing most of the kerosene-spreading. He’s the Tigers’ big trade deadline pickup so far, you guys.


Mets 4, Padres 0: Noah Syndergaard was fantastic, retiring the first 18 Padres to start the game. He finished the game having only allowed three hits and no walks while striking out nine over eight innings. The Mets are only one back of Washington, who . . .

Marlins 4, Nationals 1: . . . lost to the Fish. Jose Fernandez worked around four walks in six innings, ending up allowing only one run. He’s now 15-0 for his career in Miami.

Rockies 7, Cubs 2: All-Star D.J. LeMahieu had three hits, extending his hitting streak to 18 games, and scored twice as the Rockies move to 1-0 in the Post-Tulowitzki era. The starting pitchers in this one were named Dallas Beeler and Yohan Flande. Those sound like hockey players, right? I’m pretty sure they’re hockey players.

Pirates 8, Twins 7: Jung Ho-Kang hit a tie-breaking homer in the ninth to give the Pirates their fourth win in five games. He had two hits, scored two runs and was hit by a pitch. His pickup is looking like one of the better ones of last offseason, especially given the Pirates infield injuries. Mark Melancon got the five-out win. Not a lot of closers, save situation or otherwise, are allowed to get five outs these days.

Astros 10, Angels 5: The AP gamer leads with “Jose Altuve is the spark plug that powers the Houston Astros.” Sadly, nfor now anyway, he is only the second-best spark plug in Astros history. No word on whether he’s “gritty.” He’s good, though, and here he drove in five runs as Houston takes the first in a key three-game series against the Angels, putting them in a virtual tie for first place. Houston overcame an early 4-1 deficit in this one. Mike Trout sat this one out with a bum wrist. Bad time for the best player in baseball to be on the shelf. He’s day to day.

Reds 4, Cardinals 0: Mike Leake’s final audition for other teams went well, as he tossed eight shutout innings. Joey Votto was the primary supporting player here, hitting a three-run homer on this 3-for-3 night. He walked too.

Diamondbacks 8, Mariners 4: David Peralta had three hits and drove in two in support of Zack Godley. There are an awful lot of Zacks/Zachs in Major League Baseball today. Really, I think we’ve reached Peak Zack.

Brewers 5, Giants 2: Wily Peralta pitched in a big league game for the first time in two months and he pitched well, allowing two runs over six innings and cooling off the hot Giants. Gerardo Parra tripled, doubled, singled and scored three runs.

Video: Jose Abreu awarded a home run after Mookie Betts flips into Fenway Park bullpen

Mookie Betts

This is a difficult one to describe. Red Sox center fielder Mookie Betts tracked down a hardly hit ball from White Sox slugger Jose Abreu on Tuesday night but lost it when he fell into the bullpen

Probably a bad idea to jump there, but instincts seemed to take over when Betts realized he was running out of room to slow himself down. It goes on record as the 16th home run of the season for Abreu.

Betts was removed from the game and is being tested for a concussion. He landed very awkwardly.