Tag: Carlos Santana

schwarber getty

Video: Kyle Schwarber’s first MLB hit was an RBI triple


This probably could have been charged as an error on Indians first baseman Carlos Santana, but let’s give it up for the kid: Kyle Schwarber’s first major league hit will go down forever as an RBI triple …

Schwarber, one of the top catching prospects in the minor leagues, will be up in the bigs for the next week to serve as the Cubs’ designated hitter for a six-game stretch in American League parks. The 22-year-old was batting .320/.438/.579 with 13 home runs and 39 RBI through 58 games this season at Double-A Tennessee.

And That Happened: Tuesday’s scores and highlights

Manny Machado

Orioles 19, Phillies 3: Well that was thoroughly ridiculous. The Orioles set a franchise record with eight homers in this one., with Manny Machado and Chris Parmalee each hitting two. Of course the highlight of this — or was it the lowlight? — was Jeff Francoeur coming in and pitching two innings, about which we’ll have more to say later this morning. Or maybe the lowlight was the Phillies’ bullpen phone being off the hook, preventing Ryne Sandberg from getting anyone else to warm up when Frenchy was clearly laboring. Or maybe it was when Chase Utley was quite visibly mad at Sandberg when he was on the mound talking to Francoeur to see if he could get more pitches out of him. Either way, for every bit as uplifting and hilarious this was from the Orioles’ perspective, it was pathetic and awful from the Phillies’ perspective. I’d say it’s the kind of game that gets managers fired, but to be honest, I can’t say I’ve ever seen this kind of game before.

Cardinals 3, Twins 2: For as much as I wanted to wake up this morning and write about how the Cardinals went up there hacking, I can’t, because they only struck out four times and didn’t hit any homers. Maybe the greatest disappointment for me, personally, in the 2015 baseball season. You only get so many shots at zingers like that, an when they fail to present themselves it’s really disheartening.

Astros 8, Rockies 5: Luis Valbuena, however, took his hacks, hitting two homers and knocking in four. But really, it’s not just the same here. Sure, I could maybe make some contrived “victim takes ownership and control over the crime that befell them,” analogy, but that’s tortured even for me. Anyway, Valbuena has 41 hits this season, 16 of which are homers. After the game Hank Conger said “This guy is like the kid who only hits homers.” Which I’m pretty sure was a rejected Donald Westlake book title from 1979. He still wrote the book, but it ended up way, way too dark so he slapped his Richard Stark pen name on it and turned it into a Parker book. As usual, the movie adaptation was lacking.

UPDATE: I had no idea this existed, but multiple people have mentioned it now:


That kid HAD to have been given a bunt sign once or twice, right? Took one the other way once in a while in order to take what the pitcher was giving him? Or is this a steroids story? So many questions.

Athletics 6, Padres 5: Eric Sogard drove in the go-ahead in a tie game in the ninth inning off Craig Kimbrel to spoil Pat Murphy’s managerial debut. Murphy was Sogard’s college coach. Not going to go back and read any background on them because I’m going to choose to believe that they had a falling out once and this was a student-comes-back-and-kills-his-old-sensei-for-reasons-we’ll-never-know situaish.

Giants 6, Mariners 2: The first Giants home win in ten tries. Matt Duffy hit a two-run homer and added an RBI single. He also said after the game that the win came following a team conversation:

“We had a little discussion about it today. These fans are too good for us to be playing the way we have been at home.”

In other news, most of human experience can be described as dealing with an inherently chaotic and random universe by attempting to craft fictions in which we portray ourselves as having agency and control.

Red Sox 9, Braves 4: The losing streak ends and Brock Holt hits for the cycle. If I was a member of the Boston media I’d write a straight-faced column this morning wondering why Holt couldn’t have hit a second double instead of that single and ask whether it means his focus is lacking. It could cause Dustin Pedroia to explode and that would be sort of fun. Julio Teheran gave up six earned runs on 13 hits. I can’t remember the last pitcher I saw who, when he was good he was fine, but when he was off got totally tattooed as much as Teheran get tattooed.

Pirates 3, White Sox 0: The Pirates shut the White Sox out for the second straight game. This time it was Charlie Morton who led the way, with seven scoreless innings. Morton’s ERA is 1.62. The Pirates, in fact, have three starters with ERAs under 2.00.

Reds 5, Tigers 2: Todd Frazier had two homers and Jay Bruce added one. There was an odd replay after a play at the plate on Anthony Gose in this game that (a) took a long time; and (b) seemed to go the wrong way. After the game, Brad Ausmus voiced his frustration at the way replay has gone this year:

“I definitely think that instant replay has regressed this season,” he said. “I thought for the most part, they changed calls in order to get the play right, and they did that on a regular basis.

“I’m not seeing that this year.”

His comments on that closely mirrored what I had to say about this yesterday: that replay officials are giving too much deference to the call made on the field as opposed to simply making the better call from their better vantage point.


Mets 3, Blue Jays 2: The good Matt Harvey made an appearance, shutting out the best offense in baseball for seven innings and striking out six. Not that the Blue Jays’ efforts were in vain. Kevin Pillar helped provide a teachable moment to all the little leaguers out there: never forget to look to your third base coach. Or at third base, for that matter, as someone may be standing on it when you try to advance there.

Marlins 12, Yankees 2: Nathan Eovaldi returned to Miami and did more for the Marlins last night than he did all last year, really. The Fish scored eight off of him in the first inning ending this one before it began. Giancarlo Stanton hit a three-run homer in the fifth giving him 24 on the year. Maybe if he hits more he’ll pass Nori Aoki in the All-Star voting.

Nationals 16. Rays 4: Jeff Francoeur may have gotten all the headlines for position players pitching last night, but the Rays used two position players on the mound: Jake Elmore and Nick Franklin. Wilson Ramos homered off of each of them in this rout. Things got pretty wild last night, man.

Rangers 3, Dodgers 2: The Rangers coughed up a two-run lead in the top of the ninth when Josh Turner hit a two-run bomb, but Robinson Chirinos got it back with a walkoff homer. Before the Turner homer, Rangers starter Chi Chi Gonzalez was going for a shutout. In other news, I can’t tell you how happy I am that we have a Chi Chi playing major league baseball.

Indians 6, Cubs 0: Trevor Bauer tossed seven shutout innings and Carlos Santana drove in four with a three-run homer and an RBI double. Santana also walked twice, helping end a personal skid. Or maybe just interrupting it. Recall what I said above about an inherently chaotic and random universe? Part of dealing with that also involves grafting artificial end-points onto a never-ending river of time.

Royals 7, Brewers 2: Chris Young pitched well (7IP, 5 H, o ER) and drove in three at the plate on two RBI singles. Royals fans suddenly vote him ahead of Mike Trout as the ninth starter in the All-Star Game.

Angels 4, Diamondbacks 1: Two-run homers from Albert Pujols and David Freese was all the Angels needed, but they also got seven strong innings from Garret Richards in which he allowed only one unearned run. The game story leads with stuff about how Mike Scioscia switched the lineup around to put Pujols in the cleanup spot. Pujols will not hear about that meaning anything:

“You don’t change your approach because of where you’re hitting in the lineup. It doesn’t matter if you hit eighth, leadoff … you’ve still got to go out there and play. I wish you guys flip that page and stay focused on the things we have to concentrate on, and that’s winning — not about where I hit, or Trout hitting third. I mean, if that’s your wish, you got it tonight.”

Prediction: a future Hall of Famer explaining in no uncertain terms that hitters don’t change their approach based on where they are in the lineup will do nothing to stop the media from claiming that hitters change their approach based on where they are in the lineup. Why? Probably because, in addition to (a) attempting to craft fictions in which we portray ourselves as having agency and control; and (b) grafting artificial end-points onto a never-ending river of time, we deal with a hostile and uncaring universe by telling ourselves that we truly matter and that our place in it gives us importance merely by our occupying it. “I’m a baseball writer,” the baseball writer thinks, “and if I say something, it must be insightful and true, even if it is demonstrably not.”

Man. Today got kind of existential. Not sure why. I’m guessing Francoeur pitching had something to do with that. Really threw my ju-ju off.

Justin Verlander goes five innings in his 2015 season debut

Justin Verlander

Tigers starter Justin Verlander made his 2015 season debut for the Tigers on Saturday, pitching five effective innings against the Indians in a 5-4 loss. The right-hander allowed two runs on three hits and two walks while striking out two. One of the runs came in the fourth on Carlos Santana’s solo home run, and the other came in the fifth on a Jason Kipnis sacrifice fly.

Verlander threw 87 pitches overall, 55 for strikes. He sat mostly 92-94 MPH with his fastball, but was able to ramp it up to 97 MPH even in his final inning.

Verlander, 32, was shelved late in spring training due to a strained right triceps, forcing him to go onto the disabled list for the first time in his 11-year career. He struggled last season, finishing with an ugly 4.54 ERA and a 159/65 K/BB ratio over 206 innings.

Indians place Carlos Santana on paternity leave list

carlos santana getty

The Indians just announced that first baseman Carlos Santana has been placed on the paternity leave list. His daughter was born this morning, so he’ll take some time to enjoy the new little one before rejoining the team. Players are permitted to be on the paternity leave list for 24-72 hours.

Jerry Sands, who played well in a stint with the Indians earlier this season, will take his spot on the active roster for now.

Santana is batting just .221 through 42 games so far this season, but he has six home runs and leads the majors with 37 walks, giving him a .374 on-base percentage and a .756 OPS.

And That Happened: Wednesday’s scores and highlights

Noah Syndergaard

Mets 7, Phillies 0: The Noah Syndergaard Show. He shut out the Phillies while pitching into the eighth inning and went 3-for-3 with a homer. And it wasn’t a cheapie, either. It was cranked an estimated 430 feet:


Lucas Duda homered twice, but forget him. First basemen are supposed to hit homers.

Indians 12, Rangers 3: I was on a radio segment yesterday that taped in the morning to be played in the evening. In the morning I was asked about the Texas Rangers hot run of late and as part of that I mentioned that Colby Lewis pitching much better this year than last was key. Bet that sounded good a few hours after Lewis was beat up to the tune of ten runs on eleven hits in two and two-thirds innings. Carlos Santana and Lonnie Chisenhall each drove in three. Jason Kipnis had three hits. He’s hitting .342/.412/.537 yet didn’t even make the top five vote-getters at second base in the first round of All-Star balloting.

Rockies 6, Reds 4: Some more lack of respect: Nolan Arenado was fifth among NL third baseman in All-Star voting. Which, sure, I can see Matt Carpenter ahead of him and realize Kris Bryant is the big new star, but David Wright is being thrown on the “bring out your dead” cart from the Holy Grail and he’s a slot up on our man from Colorado here. No worries, all he did was hit a three-run homer here. In his past four games he’s 9-for-16 with three homers, a triple and 10 RBI.

Pirates 5, Marlins 2: Six in a row for the Pirates thanks to a five-run seventh inning. All of those runs came with two outs. Not gonna say it’s going well for Pittsburgh, but Starling Marte worked a bases-loaded walk during that rally. Marte’s career K/BB ratio is *does some frantic tapping on a calculator* “EEEEEEEEEEEEEE48.”  Well, crap. I broke my dang calculator.

White Sox 5, Blue Jays 3: Adam LaRoche singled in the go-ahead run in the 10th to help break a four-game skid. Jose Abreu had three hits with two RBI and scored the winning run. A fortunate win for the Chisox, as David Robertson blew yet another save here on yet another Josh Donaldson homer.

Yankees 4, Royals 2: Alex Rodriguez hit a three-run homer which pushed him past Lou Gehrig’s American League record for RBI. The Yankees swept the Royals in three, outscoring them 23-4 in the process. I still don’t know if anyone knows what to make of this Yankees team. You got old guys and hurt guys but all of their guys, in terms of talent, are pretty great. It’s like your old dog, maybe. These days he sits around and sleeps a lot. But sometimes you see him bound up and run after a rabbit or something based on muscle memory and habit. At this point I could see them bashing their way into the playoffs or finishing in fourth with half the roster on the DL. Lucky for them no one else seems to want to win the AL East.

Twins 6, Red Sox 4: I’ll outsource this one to blogmate Aaron Gleeman, who wrote about the Twins’ sweeping the Sox and their improbable run to first place and the second-best record in the AL in the early going:

I wrote a lengthy article on my Twins-centric personal blog about how they’ve been winning so far, but the short version is great hitting with runners in scoring position, Glen Perkins being perfect in the closer role, and the starting rotation going from historically inept to merely sort of bad. If you want the long version, there are 1,200 more words here. As a lifelong Twins fan I have no idea how long it’ll continue, but whatever. Beats the hell out of looking ahead to next year’s draft already, no matter what.

Mariners 3, Rays 0: I wrote this game up yesterday. All I know is that King Felix is absolutely amazing. And that maybe Kevin Cash shouldn’t have taken Chris Archer out of the game after 95 pitches given how dominating he was.

Giants 3, Brewers 1: Ryan Vogelsong started poorly this year but has now won three in a row. He’s a microcosm of the Giants’ season I guess. He allowed one run in six innings here and struck out five. Joe Panik hit a two-run homer. The Giants hot steak has been something. Now, to be fair, 11 of their past 14 have come against three of the worst teams in baseball in the Brewers, Rockies and Reds, but still.

Tigers 3, Athletics 2: Yoenis Cespedes hit a three-run homer to break a scoreless tie against his old mates — at least those of them that are left from last year — and six Tigers pitchers combined to six-hit the A’s.

Orioles 5, Astros 4: On another radio show I was on yesterday morning which, I hope anyway, was live, I talked about how Chris Davis needs to step it up to help the O’s. Step it up he did, hitting two homers, both tie-breakers. Jimmy Paredes had two hits and stole home. It was a delayed double steal, which, eh, but a steal of home is a steal of home I suppose.

Nationals 3, Cubs 0: Bryce Harper homered again and Max Scherzer struck out 13 in seven shutout innings, lowering his ERA to 1.51. Someone ask Thom Loverro of the Washington Times if that’s good enough.

Cardinals 4, Diamondbacks 3: A ninth inning rally gave the Cards the sweep. Jason Heyward homered to tie it leading off the ninth. Then Peter Bourjos, running home from third on a Jhonny Peralta chopper, slid into catcher Jordan Pacheco’s leg as he was forced out at home. That threw Pacheco off balance, causing his throw down to first to get Peralta to sail over the first baseman’s head which, in turn, allowed Matt Carpenter to come around to score the walkoff win. Crazy:


Padres 5, Angels 4: Justin Upton and Matt Kemp hit RBI singles in the seventh and Will Middlebrooks had a two-run homer to back Andrew Cashner, who tends not to get a ton of run support.

Braves 3, Dodgers 2: Juan Uribe came back against the team he played for just the night before and went 0-for-3 with a couple of strikeouts. The Braves didn’t need his production, however, as Alex Wood allowed only one run in seven innings. Andrelton Simmons had two hits and scored the go-ahead run on a wild pitch. Cameron Maybin homered.