Tag: Carlos Guillen

Detroit Tigers Carlos Guillen heads for first base after being walked by Oakland Athletics pitcher Fautino De Los Santos during the seventh inning of their MLB American League baseball game in Detroit, Michigan

Three-time All-Star Carlos Guillen announces retirement


Carlos Guillen, who signed a minor-league contract with the Mariners on February 1, announced his retirement today.

Guillen had a remarkable career, transitioning from light-hitting shortstop to an impact bat who played all over the diamond, but injuries limited him to just 81, 68, and 28 mostly ineffective games during the past three seasons.

He calls it quits at age 36 after playing 14 seasons in the majors, including two huge years for the Tigers in 2004 (.318 with 20 homers and a .921 OPS) and 2006 (.320 with 19 homers and a .920 OPS).

Overall the switch-hitting Guillen batted .285 with a .355 on-base percentage and .443 slugging percentage in 1,305 games for the Mariners and Tigers. Among all active hitters with at least 5,000 career plate appearances he ranks 32nd in adjusted OPS+ at 111, alongside Alfonso Soriano (112), Andruw Jones (111), and Adrian Beltre (110).

He made three All-Star teams and earned $70 million. Not a bad career for a guy who was second-best prospect (behind Freddy Garcia) traded from the Astros to the Mariners for Randy Johnson in 1998.

UPDATE: Guillen talked about his decision with Greg Johns of MLB.com:

It’s a tough decision. I tried to come back, but I couldn’t. I’ve been through a lot of injuries. You have to keep your head up and be in the right position to keep going. But at this time, your body tells you, you know? It’s hard because you only make this decision one time in your career and in your life.

Running down the rosters: Seattle Mariners

Felix Hernandez

The Mariners have finished in last place in the AL West six of the last eight years, and while their is a shining ray of hope on the way in 2013 in the form of the Astros, they’re going to have a tough time not making it seven of nine years this season.

Felix Hernandez – R
Jason Vargas – L
Hisashi Iwakuma – R
Kevin Millwood – R
Hector Noesi – R

Brandon League – R
Shawn Kelley – R
George Sherrill – L
Hong-Chih Kuo – L
Tom Wilhelmsen – R
Shawn Camp – R
Cesar Jimenez – L

SP next in line: Blake Beavan (R), Charlie Furbush (L), Danny Hultzen (L), James Paxton (L)
RP next in line: Aaron Heilman (R), Josh Kinney (R), Chance Ruffin (R), Steve Delabar (R), Lucas Luetge (L)(Rule 5), Oliver Perez (L)

Faith in their ability to develop pitching (and turn reclamation projects into third and fourth starters) led to the Mariners’ trade of Michael Pineda for Jesus Montero. They still have plenty of pitching depth, but the club will likely be without a legitimate No. 2 starter until someone from the Hultzen-Paxton-Taijuan Walker group emerges. In the meantime, the Mariners figure to get solid pitching, but that’s simply not good enough given the state of their offense.

3B Chone Figgins – S
2B Dustin Ackley – L
RF Ichiro Suzuki – L
1B Justin Smoak – S
LF Mike Carp – L
DH Jesus Montero – R
C Miguel Olivo – R
CF Franklin Gutierrez – R
SS Brendan Ryan – R

C John Jaso – L
INF Carlos Guillen – S
INF Munenori Kawasaki – L
OF Casper Wells – R

Next in line: C Adam Moore (R), INF Luis Rodriguez (S), 3B Kyle Seager (L), 3B Alex Liddi (R), 3B-OF Vinnie Catricala (R), OF Trayvon Robinson (S), OF Michael Saunders (L), OF Carlos Peguero (L), OF Darren Ford (R), OF Mike Wilson (R)

That’s not the lineup I would use, but I’m not being consulted. In my mind, Seager’s left-handed bat is exactly what the right-handed-heavy bottom of the order needs. In going with Figgins at third base and in the leadoff spot, all of the lefties and switch-hitters are getting stacked in a row. The Mariners could bat Montero fourth or fifth instead of sixth — flip-flopping him and Smoak makes more sense than the current arrangement — but I don’t know that they’re going to want to put that much pressure on him initially.

While the starting nine appears set, the bench does have some question marks. The Mariners could carry Seager if they think they’d have enough playing time available for him. It’ll probably come down to him and Guillen for one spot and to Kawasaki and Rodriguez for the other. Seager has some experience at shortstop, but the Mariners will likely want to carry a true backup middle infielder. Wells is the heavy favorite to serve as the backup outfielder. He should start over Carp in left field against lefties.

The offense will almost certainly be improved this year, probably by a substantial margin, but there’s just so much ground to make up. The Mariners scored 556 runs last year. The other 13 AL teams averaged 735 runs. Montero’s arrival, full seasons from Ackley and Carp and a rebound from Ichiro will all help, but it’s unlikely to really start coming together for the Mariners before 2013.

Carlos Guillen returns to Mariners on minor-league contract

Detroit Tigers Carlos Guillen heads for first base after being walked by Oakland Athletics pitcher Fautino De Los Santos during the seventh inning of their MLB American League baseball game in Detroit, Michigan

Carlos Guillen, who played for the Mariners from 1998-2003 before being traded to the Tigers, is returning to Seattle on a minor-league contract.

Guillen has had a very good, very odd career, shifting all over the diamond defensively while developing into an impact hitter in his late twenties, but now he’s simply trying to hang around coming off lots of health problems at age 36.

He’s played just 81, 68, and 28 games during the past three seasons and finally stopped producing offensively last year, batting .232 with a .633 OPS in limited action.

Still, considering how desperate the Mariners have been for any sort of lineup help adding Guillen on a no-risk deal makes sense. They originally acquired him from the Astros, along with Freddy Garcia and John Halama, in the Randy Johnson deal.