Tag: Bryan Petersen

Gio Gonzalez

Gio Gonzalez is game’s first to 20 wins this season


The National League’s Cy Young favorites both added to their cases Saturday, with the Nationals’ Gio Gonzalez beating the Brewers for win No. 20 of the season and the Mets’ R.A. Dickey going eight strong to defeat Miami for his 19th victory.

Gonzalez held the Brewers to two runs — both unearned — over seven innings in a 10-4 rout. The runs came after a Bryce Harper error in the sixth. Gonzalez allowed just three hits and walked one in lowering his ERA to 2.84.

Dickey took a shutout into the ninth, only to get charged with two runs after Jon Rauch gave up a three-run homer to John Buck. That took Dickey’s ERA from 2.58 to 2.66, but he still holds the NL lead over Clayton Kershaw (2.70) and Kyle Lohse (2.71).

Dickey was also robbed of a three-run double or triple on a terrific play from Bryan Petersen in the sixth. You can watch the video here. It would have been Dickey’s first extra-base hit since 2010 and just the third of his career.

That Dickey has such a big edge in innings pitched over Gonzalez — 220 to 193 1/3 at the moment — should be a determining factor in the Cy Young race. However, if Dickey ends up stuck on 19 wins and Gonzalez finishes as the NL’s only pitcher with 20, it’s possible the left-hander will take home the hardware.

Emilio Bonifacio out 4-6 weeks after thumb surgery

New York Mets v Miami Marlins

So much for those initial reports that an MRI exam ruled out structural damage in Emilio Bonifacio’s injured thumb, as Clark Spencer of the Miami Herald reports that he’ll undergo surgery tomorrow and is expected to miss 4-6 weeks.

When the Marlins placed Bonifacio on the disabled list Sunday they indicated that the plan was for him to return after the minimum 15 days, but now he’s out until at least July. Miami also placed Austin Kearns on the DL today with a hamstring strain, so the Marlins are suddenly very thin in the outfield with Bryan Petersen and Chris Coghlan now slotted in as starters.

Before the injury Bonifacio was hitting .268 with a .351 on-base percentage and doing tons of damage on the bases with a league-leading 20 steals in 21 attempts. Of course, the injury came on a steal attempt and despite all the running he scored just 19 runs in 39 games.

Bryan Petersen emulates Logan Morrison in all of the wrong ways

Bryan Petersen

The Marlins have a second outfielder whose tweets they may need to worry about.

Bryan Petersen, a 25-year-old outfielder with a shot of making the team as a bench player this spring, tweeted the following this evening:

For those of u who think u have to hit .330 with 30 and 100 to have a life off the field, suck it. It’s not my fault u hate ur 9 to 5.

The sentiment isn’t so wrong. The delivery, though, could definitely use some work.

Oh, and just in case Petersen’s tweet wasn’t going to get enough attention with his 8,000+ followers, the game’s most notorious tweeting player, Marlins teammate Logan Morrison, retweeted it to his 93,000+ followers.

Petersen, for what it’s worth, was pretty impressive with his .265/.357/.387 line in 204 at-bats last season, though that came with all of 10 RBI (he hit .300 with the bases empty, .203 with runners on). He has a chance to be a pretty good part-timer going forward, but as far more of a fringe player than Morrison, he’s not going to get as much leeway for any missteps.

Running down the rosters: Miami Marlins

Marlins Spring Baseball

The hopes are high with LeBron James having one of the greatest statistical seasons in NBA history and the Dolphins potentially landing Peyton Manning or Matt Flynn as their new quarterback. Also, the baseball team has a new name, a new stadium and a new star shortstop. Let’s see if that does the Marlins any good.

Josh Johnson – R
Mark Buehrle – L
Anibal Sanchez – R
Ricky Nolasco – R
Carlos Zambrano – R

Heath Bell – R
Edward Mujica – R
Michael Dunn – L
Ryan Webb – R
Randy Choate – L
Steve Cishek – R
Wade LeBlanc – L

Restricted list: Juan Oviedo (R)
SP next in line: Brad Hand (L), LeBlanc, Alex Sanabia (R), Sean West (L)
RP next in line: Jose Ceda (R), Chris Hatcher (R), Chad Gaudin (R), Sandy Rosario (R)

Along with their $106 million outlay for Jose Reyes, the Marlins spent $58 million on Buehrle and $27 million on Bell, adding stability to a staff that has lacked it for several years. Buehrle won’t contend for a Cy Young, but he’ll be at least a bit above average over the course of 200 innings. Bell’s best years are probably behind him, but he figures to be a quality closer for at least a couple of more years.

The Marlins have plenty of upside elsewhere. Johnson would be a legitimate Cy Young contender if he could stay healthy. Sanchez has posted an ERA in the mid-3.00s each of the last two years. If  those two combine to make 60 starts and either Nolasco or Zambrano can rebound (probably too much to expect both to do so), then the Marlins would be definite threats for the wild card.

SS Jose Reyes – S
CF Emilio Bonifacio – S
3B Hanley Ramirez – R
RF Mike Stanton – R
LF Logan Morrison – L
1B Gaby Sanchez – R
C John Buck – R
2B Omar Infante – R

C Brett Hayes – R
1B-3B Greg Dobbs – L
INF Donnie Murphy – R
OF Scott Cousins – L
OF Aaron Rowand – R

Next in line: C Clint Sammons (R), 3B Matt Dominguez (R), INF Nick Green (R), INF Gil Velazquez (R), OF Austin Kearns (R), OF Chris Coghlan (L), OF Bryan Petersen (L), OF Kevin Mattison (L)

Obviously, much depends on Hanley here. In him, Reyes and Stanton, the Marlins may well possess three of the NL’s top 10 position players. Day one went off without a hitch, but it still remains to be seen whether he’ll make an issue of the move to third base. A pouting Ramirez figures to be an unproductive Ramirez, but if Ozzie Guillen can get through to him — and who better to make the attempt — then the lineup could be dynamite.

What is disappointing is that the Marlins didn’t make much of an attempt to upgrade their bench over the winter. But Bonifacio’s versatility does help there. If Reyes or Infante gets hurt (and the Marlins don’t want to move Hanley back to short), Bonifacio can move back to the infield, opening up center for whichever outfielder is playing better. The Marlins do have plenty of competition for those outfield bench spots: one figures to go to a lefty (Cousins, Coghlan or Petersen) and the other to a righty (Rowand or Kearns).

In the Marlins’ case, I’m skeptical that the whole will be the equal to the sum of its parts. There’s some terrific talent here, and it wouldn’t be stunning to see the team win 95+ games and maybe even overtake the Phillies in the NL East. It also wouldn’t be much of a surprise to see Hanley force his way off the team and Johnson spend the bulk of the year on the DL, leading to a fourth-place finish. My guess is that they sneak into the postseason via the wild card, but I’m far from confident.