Tag: Brandon McCarthy

Trevor Cahill

The Dodgers sign Trevor Cahill


Baseball America’s Matt Eddy reports that the Dodgers have signed Trevor Cahill.

Cahill was designated for assignment by the Atlanta Braves earlier this month after allowing 23 runs in 26 innings and getting demoted to the pen in the process. That’s a long way removed from the Cahill who made the All-Star team for the A’s as a 22-year-old in 2010 and later signed a $30 million contract. Since the beginning of 2014, however, he’s gone 3-15 with a 5.98 ERA, with the Dbacks and then the Braves cutting ties with him.

Injuries to both Hyun-jin Ryu and Brandon McCarthy make him attractive to the Dodgers, however, and they’ll try this quick and cheap fix before, one presumes, looking around for trade possibilities.

Brett Anderson proving to be a wise gamble for Dodgers

MIAMI, FL - JUNE 26: Brett Anderson #35 of the Los Angeles Dodgers pitches during the second inning of the game against the Miami Marlins at Marlins Park on June 26, 2015 in Miami, Florida.  (Photo by Rob Foldy/Getty Images)

The Dodgers signed left-hander Brett Anderson to a one-year, $10 million contract over the winter even though injuries had limited him to a total of 123 innings at the major league level between 2012-2014. It has proven to be a wise gamble thus far.

Anderson struck out a season-high 10 batters over seven innings of one-run ball in a 7-1 win over the Marlins last night. He gave up just five hits and one walk, with the only run scoring on a ground out from Adeiny Hechavarria in the first inning. Amazingly, he allowed just one fly ball in the 25 batters he faced while inducing 13 grounders.

Anderson now has a 3.13 ERA and 62/24 K/BB ratio in 89 innings across 15 starts this season. Meanwhile, his ground ball rate of 68.7 percent is the highest among major league starters. The 27-year-old has allowed two earned runs or fewer in six out of his last seven starts and has gone at least seven innings in four of them. He has already logged his most innings in a season since his age-22 season in 2010 with the Athletics. His career veered off track after that due to a long list of injuries, but not only is he healthy right now, he’s thriving. It’s easy to get overlooked on a staff which also includes Clayton Kershaw and Zack Greinke, but his steady presence has been important for a rotation which has lost Hyun-Jin Ryu and Brandon McCarthy to injury.

Jose Tabata is at no fault for ending Max Scherzer’s bid for a perfect game

Jose Tabata

Jose Tabata pinch-hit for Pirates reliever Vance Worley with two outs in the ninth inning, the only man standing between Max Scherzer and the 24th perfect game in baseball history. Scherzer was absolutely dealing and Tabata didn’t look like he was having any fun trying to make contact. He fouled off the first two pitches, worked the count back to 2-2, weakly fouled off three more pitches, and then was hit on his left elbow by a slider.

The video below shows what happened:

Rule 6.08b says:

The batter becomes a runner and is entitled to first base without liability to be put out (provided he advances to and touches first base) when —


(b) He is touched by a pitched ball which he is not attempting to hit unless (1) The ball is in the strike zone when it touches the batter, or (2) The batter makes no attempt to avoid being touched by the ball;
If the ball is in the strike zone when it touches the batter, it shall be called a strike, whether or not the batter tries to avoid the ball. If the ball is outside the strike zone when it touches the batter, it shall be called a ball if he makes no attempt to avoid being touched.

Dodgers pitcher Brandon McCarthy thinks Tabata wasn’t at fault, tweeting, “looked like a totally normal reaction from a hitter to an inside breaking ball- why the hate?”

Scherzer threw an 86 MPH slider. At 60 feet, six inches, a batter has less than a half-second with which to react. Considering how much movement Scherzer’s slider has, and how far away the pitch actually was from the strike zone, it’s perfectly reasonable that Tabata would get hit by it and not appear to have made much of an effort in getting out of the way.

But let’s play devil’s advocate here. Let’s say that Tabata intentionally leaned into the pitch to ruin Scherzer’s perfect game. He did it and got away with it, as home plate umpire Mike Muchlinski didn’t interject. How is that any different than a catcher framing a ball outside of the strike zone to increase the probability of a strike call? Both players are attempting to exploit a gray area in order to maximize their teams’ odds of winning.

Some have argued that Tabata should have been up at the plate with the intent of breaking up Scherzer’s perfect game with a hit. Why? Perfect games are special because they’re so hard to attain; they would start to lose their luster if we pressure players into ending them in only certain, approved ways. There have been 24 in baseball history, only a slightly more common occurrence than a four-homer game. If a player has hit three home runs and takes his next at-bat, do we expect the pitcher to throw him a meatball to make his attempt to make baseball history easier? No, the pitcher goes at the hitter with everything he has.

Furthermore, the game was not a done deal. In 999,999 of 1,000,000 iterations of the game state after Tabata was hit — two outs, one on, down by six — the Pirates lose, but Tabata should still have been trying to play for a win irrespective of Scherzer’s bid for a perfect game. His job is to get on base. If that includes getting hit by a pitch at the expense of Scherzer’s perfect game, so be it.

Some have advocated the Nationals throw at Tabata in Sunday’s series finale. Tabata did nothing wrong. That disappointment should be directed at more deserving targets, such as Scherzer for making a poor pitch.

Tabata talks about ending Scherzer’s perfect game:

Scherzer says he doesn’t fault Tabata and would have done the same thing in his position.

Dodgers left-hander Hyun-Jin Ryu to have season-ending shoulder surgery

hyun-jin ryu

Hyun-Jin Ryu hasn’t thrown a pitch this season after being shut down with shoulder soreness late in spring training and the Dodgers just announced that the left-hander will undergo season-ending surgery.

Ryu has been one of the league’s most underrated starters since signing with the Dodgers in 2013, throwing 344 innings with a 3.17 ERA and 293/78 K/BB ratio.

However, he was limited to 26 starts last season due to shoulder problems on two different occasions. He’ll hope to make a full recovery in time for Opening Day and the 28-year-old Ryu is signed through 2018.

He joins Brandon McCarthy on the sidelines for the remainder of the season, leaving the Dodgers’ short on rotation depth behind Clayton Kershaw and Zack Greinke.

Video: Santiago Casilla gets the save with an “immaculate inning”

Santiago Casilla

An immaculate inning is when a pitcher gets all three outs in an inning via strikeout on nine pitches, all strikes. Giants closer Casilla accomplished the feat to wrap up Sunday afternoon’s 9-8 victory over the Reds.

Immaculate innings only happen a handful of times every season. Mike Fiers is the only other pitcher to have done it so far this year. In 2014, Brad Boxberger, Cole Hamels, Justin Masterson, Garrett Richards, Rex Brothers, and Brandon McCarthy performed the task.

Casilla struck out Marlon Byrd, Brandon Phillips, and Jay Bruce. Check it out here: