Tag: Boston Red Sox

Xander Bogaerts

Video: Xander Bogaerts hits a Little League grand slam against the Phillies


Red Sox shortstop Xander Bogaerts helped his team take a commanding 7-0 lead in the fourth inning against the Phillies on Saturday, clearing the bases and coming around to score on what should have been only a double, but turned out to be a Little League grand slam.

Bogaerts slashed an Alec Asher offering down the right field line. Right fielder Aaron Altherr corralled the ball and hit cutoff man Cesar Hernandez. Hernandez fired a weak throw to catcher Carlos Ruiz, bouncing off of him and into foul territory. Betts, at third base, used the opportunity to scamper home. Bogaerts was credited with a double and three RBI, advancing to third base on the relay throw home and scoring on Hernandez’s throwing error.

David Ortiz followed up with a solo home run, his 30th of the season and the 496th of his career.

Red Sox place Hanley Ramirez on disabled list with shoulder injury

MIAMI, FL - AUGUST 11:  Hanley Ramirez #13 of the Boston Red Sox stands in the dugout as the Red Sox played the Miami Marlins at Marlins Park on August 11, 2015 in Miami, Florida. (Photo by Joe Skipper/Getty Images)

After missing more than a week, Hanley Ramirez was placed on the 15-day disabled list by the Red Sox today due to what was termed as right shoulder inflammation.

The move comes as a bit of a surprise, as rosters have expanded and there’s no obvious need to put him on the disabled list. At the very least, this rules him out from playing again until next Friday. According to Sean McAdam of CSNNE.com, acting Red Sox manager Torey Lovullo said yesterday that there’s no timetable for Ramirez’s return. If he does play again this season, it will be at first base, which is expected to be his position next season.

In the first year of a four-year, $88 million contract, Ramirez is batting .249/.291/.426 with 19 home runs and 53 RBI over 105 games. He has zero homers and a .450 OPS since the All-Star break.

David Ortiz tweets his happiness about the Deflategate decision

World Series - Boston Red Sox v St Louis Cardinals - Game Four

Look, Deflategate posts are gold, man. And I’m sitting in baseball land over here, like a sucker, with virtually no way to get in on that haul. It’s hard!

I thought that maybe I could, once again, note just how horribly and consistently wrong ESPN’s legal “expert” Lester Munson is about all things upon which he is called to opine, but that’s beating a dead horse at this point, yes?

Thank God, then, for David Ortiz, who has given me an excuse to use the word “Deflategate” in a headline on a blog post on the world wide web:


That word’s very presence will likely make this the most trafficked post I do all day. We can talk about whether that, or the world for that matter, is fair, but in the end, isn’t web traffic what it’s really all about?

If you’re interested in this topic beyond its status as gold-plated clickbait and raw nihilism, go read Mike Florio’s copious content on the topic at ProFootballTalk.

David Ortiz is more likely to be boned in Hall of Fame voting for being a DH than for PED stuff

David Ortiz

I’ll preface this by saying — though I presume most of you know that I think this anyway — that whatever stock you put in David Ortiz’s PED associations, I do not think they should enter into his Hall of Fame candidacy one iota. To the extent there is stuff on him it’s generally weak stuff about being on a positive test list that was never to have seen the light of day and which, due to the procedures in place and the passage of time, Ortiz has no ability to refute in the manner any other person accused of using PEDs has the right to refute. He’s kinda boned in that regard.

And, of course, because I’m a PED apologist, for purposes of his Hall of Fame case, I really don’t even care if he was suspended for PEDs last week. I hope I don’t need to rehash my arguments about why I feel that way. If you’re a new student here, ask the person in the desk next to you. He or she can provide you with background. I’ll start you out with this little thing which makes me wonder if Ortiz hasn’t actually had more brushes with PEDs than most people say and offer that, really, I don’t care about it insofar as it affects his Hall of Fame case or his legacy.

With all of that out of the way, let’s read Ken Rosenthal’s article about Ortiz’s Hall of Fame case which, he correctly notes, will likely be complicated by that PED association:

Ortiz likely will not appear on the ballot until at least ’21, and likely not drop off it – if he falls short of the 75 percent minimum necessary for election – until at least ’31.

That’s a long time, folks.

Time, perhaps, for the voters to reconsider their views on players alleged to have used performance-enhancing drugs, as Ortiz was in 2009 when the New York Times reported that he was on a list of 104 players who had tested positive in ’03.

Rosenthal’s argument is that, perhaps, the minds of Hall of Fame voters will change some time between 2021 and 2031.

I think they may change, but I think that if Ortiz were to appear on the ballot tomorrow, the PED stuff wouldn’t matter for him a bit. Mostly because he, like Andy Pettitte, has never been considered a “cheater” by the anti-PED crew the way others with similar evidence against them have. For example, Sammy Sosa, who hit over 600 home runs and who, people’s speculation and some amount of reasonable conjecture notwithstanding, actually has no more hard PED evidence against him than Ortiz has. He’s not sniffing Cooperstown, ever, and he doesn’t even get the benefit of a baseball-based breakdown like Ortiz will get.

Rosenthal also mentions Ortiz’s status as a DH impacting his case. I actually think a lot more people will hold that against him than the PED stuff. Which shows you that, if Hall of Fame voters are irrational about one thing, they can be even more irrational about another, less reasonable thing if given the chance.

And That Happened: Wednesday’s scores and highlights

Clayton Kershaw

Dodgers 2, Giants 1: Kershaw: Complete game, one earned run, 15 strikeouts. He also got a hit. That’s 251 Ks on the year for Kershaw and he still has five or even possibly six starts left, barring him being skipped a time or two to get ready for the postseason. And given that the Dodgers just swept the Giants and opened up a six and a half game lead in the West, I’d say the postseason looks pretty certain.

Nationals 4, Cardinals 3: Ryan Zimmermann homered twice and the Nationals managed to hold a slim lead in the late innings for once. Max Scherzer struck out 11 but gave up 11 hits while clinging to a 3-2 lead, forcing him out after six innings. Matt Williams decided that, rather than letting a bad reliever blow the save, he’d just let everyone in a Nats uniform pitch. Matt Grace, the third pitcher of the seventh inning, did the save-blowing honors here. allowing an inherited runner to score to tie things up. Williams used four pitchers in the seventh in all. Zimmermann thankfully tied things up with an eighth inning double and in the eighth and ninth Williams went with Drew Storen and Jonathan Papelbon who did their usual jobs. I shudder to think what Williams might’ve done if he DIDN’T have a lead in the ninth on the road. Maybe have Zimmerman pitch? Could be cool?

Marlins 7, Braves 3: Marlins sweep the Braves, who just lost the last eight games of a nine-game homestand. That’s the longest home losing streak for Atlanta since 1988. Which is wonderful, because the 1988 Braves were the best Braves team ever.

Reds 7, Cubs 4: The Cubs were down by two in the eighth inning when Kris Bryant hit a game-trying home run. Yay! Then, in the ninth, with the score tied, Bryant let a Jay Bruce grounder go through the wickets on what would’ve and should’ve been out number three. That extended the inning and allowed Joey Votto to come to the plate and he promptly hit a three-run homer. Oops! Votto on the season: .316/.457/.567 and 27 homers. He could easily make the list my friends Mike and Bill at the Platoon Advantage did several years ago of The Greatest Individual Seasons on Terrible Teams.

Angels 9, Athletics 4: Albert Pujols had an RBI singe and a two-run homer. The homer was his 35th, giving him 10 35-home run seasons in his first 15 years. Only four guys have done that before. The only other ones: Willie Mays, Mike Schmidt and Alex Rodriguez.

Yankees 13, Red Sox 8: The Yankees scored eight times in the second inning, with homers from Greg Bird, John Ryan Murphy and Carlos Beltran in that inning and added dingers from Stephen Drew and Didi Gregorius later in the game. Bird’s homer came off Henry Owens, a lefty, so maybe all that talk about the need to platoon Bird at first base is overstated. Twenty-one runs in this game and it still lasted “only” three and a half hours. Which is something for a Yankees-Red Sox game. Back in the day a 2-1 game with complete games from both starters would push four hours. Viva La Innings Clock.

Mariners 8, Astros 3: Shawn O’Malley had three hits, including a tiebreaking RBI single in a two-run eighth inning. Not bad for his Mariners debut. A Seattle kid, O’Malley said after the game that “my grandpa and father were huge Mariners fans.” Given that I remember when people still invariably referred to the Mariners as “an expansion team,” I find it hard to get my brain around the idea of anyone’s grandfather being a Mariners fan. Of course I’m an old fart, so whatever.

Rangers 4, Padres 3: Mitch doubled in the go-ahead run in the 10th inning, cutting first-place Houston’s lead in the AL West to two games. Which, holy moly, it’s crazy enough that Houston is the team they’re chasing, but the Rangers getting close is just as amazing given what everyone was thinking back in the spring.

Orioles 7, Rays 6: Two homers from Chris Davis including the walkoff bomb in extras. Watch that second one as it enters the stands.

It’s very nice of Davis to wake up that man sleeping in the center field bleachers, no?

Blue Jays 5, Indians 1: R.A. Dickey went the distance, allowing only one run on four hits. In case you were looking for even more data points about how the Blue Jays have surged, how about R.A. Dickey being  7-0 with a 2.78 ERA in the second half?

Mets 9, Phillies 4: Ruben Tejada hit an inside-the-park home run on a ball when outfielder Domonic Brown flipped over the wall down the right field line trying to field it:


Oops. Yoenis Cespedes and rookie Michael Conforto had homers that didn’t make Phillies fielders look silly.

Royals 12, Tigers 1: Yordano Ventura struck out 11 in seven innings and Royals batters formed conga lines around the bases against Tigers pitching. Not long until the Wolverines, Wings and Lions get started, Michigan people. Yes, even the Lions are worth looking forward to this year.

Brewers 9, Pirates 4: The Brewers have been owning the Pirates lately, notching their fifth straight win against them. Jonathan Lucroy drove in three runs. Lucroy has a ten game hitting streak in which he’s 18 for 40 (.450) with three homers and 14 RBI.

Twins 3, White Sox 0: Tommy Milone tossed seven shutout innings and Miguel Sano hit a long homer. As Aaron drooled yesterday, Sano  is hitting .295/.403/.608 with 14 homers, 13 doubles, 33 walks, 41 RBI and 32 runs through 50 games. Extrapolated to 162 games that works out to 45 homers, 42 doubles, 107 walks, and 133 RBIs. And, as we noted the other day, he’s only 22 friggin years old.


Rockies 9, Diamondbacks 4: Two homers for Carlos Gonzalez, including a grand slam and seven driven in. Nolan Arenado also hit a homer. The two of them are tied for the team lead with 33. They’re also the only two reasons to really watch Rockies games.