Tag: Bartolo Colon

Bartolo Colon

Bartolo Colon may be the Mets’ Opening Day starter


Adam Rubin of ESPN reports that the Mets are “strongly considering” Bartolo Colon to be their Opening Day starter.

Not Matt Harvey, who has missed 17 months nor Jacob deGrom, who was the Mets best pitcher last year. Which I suppose could bug someone if someone cared about such things. In the rational world, however, being an Opening Day starter is usually either a reward for being the team’s “ace” or, in some cases, a nod to seniority. It’s not really a big deal.

Unless of course you have a kinda sketchy Hall of Fame case, in which case it means practically everything.

Whatever the case, I have argued in the past that teams should run their worst starting pitcher out on Opening Day. I mean, the game is going to sell out regardless, so you don’t need the star power. Plus, with all of the pregame festivities and hoopla, the game often starts late anyway. Who do you want to annoy more, your ace or the dude who just barely nailed down the last rotation spot and who will probably be in the pen or Triple-A before June?

In other news, there are about 10,000 pretty good reasons no one has ever asked me to manage their team. This is merely one of them.

Let’s play “Baseball Mortality”

Chicago Cubs v Colorado Rockies

On Twitter last night D.J. pointed out that our current “Top Posts” banner is pretty damn retro at the moment:


The last time those three players could be seen in real life in those three uniforms was 2001 so, yeah.

The Giambi retirement has me thinking about time and age. I was born on July 14, 1973. He was born on January 8, 1971, making him one of the last active players who was older than me. As far as I can tell, that leaves only two guys in the bigs who made it to this Earth before I did: LaTroy Hawkins (b. 12/21/72) and Bartolo Colon (b. 5/24/73). Hawkins is apparently a cyborg, so he’ll be around for another, like, 50 years. Maybe he can be for me like Jamie Moyer was for so many of you old farts: that one guy who hangs on forever, delaying the inevitable day when every big leaguer is a whippersnapper in my eyes.

That got me thinking about who was the first big league ballplayer younger than me. I think it’s Ismael Valdez (b. 8/21/73), who made his debut for the Dodgers on June 15, 1994. Valdez has been out of baseball for a decade. The next player younger than me after him was Alex Rodriguez, who debuted on July 8, 1994.

“Baseball Mortality,” or whatever you want to call it, is a fun game to play. A good place to start is this chart for the younger-than-you crew and this chart for the old timers.

If you’re not in the right frame of mind, Baseball Mortality can be a little depressing. But don’t let it be. The actors and rock stars who are younger than you come first. Then the ballplayers. Because they’re so visible, those are the types of folks that we tend to think of when we look to external age markers. But they’re on the extreme end. A lot of you are still younger than, say, all the presidents. Maybe your doctor. A full professor at your local college. Personally, I take great comfort in knowing that Raymond Chandler didn’t publish his first novel until he was 51. We all got time.

But, at least if LaTroy Hawkins or Bartolo Colon are in a given game, I can call all the ballplayers “kids” now. Which is simultaneously fun and unsettling.

It sounds like the Mets will keep all of their starting pitchers

dillon gee getty

At the start of the offseason, it appeared inevitable that the Mets would move one of their starting pitchers. Using their surplus as part of a blockbuster deal for a shortstop was always a possibility, but most of the talk centered around Dillon Gee and Bartolo Colon and Jon Niese to a lesser degree. However, a satisfactory deal failed to materialize and it now sounds like the Mets could go into the season with all of them:

As of now, Gee appears to be the odd man out for a rotation spot, with Matt Harvey, Jacob deGrom, Zack Wheeler, Jon Niese, and Bartolo Colon in front of him. And don’t forget, they have Noah Syndergaard, Rafael Montero, and even Steven Matz close to the majors. The Mets could still find a trade partner for Gee if some team suffers an injury in the spring, so we shouldn’t get too far ahead of ourselves here. And heck, they might have an injury in their own rotation. Barring any of those outcomes though, Gee will be a $5.3 million reliever this season.

Dillon Gee still drawing some trade interest for the Mets

Dillon Gee Getty

Mike Puma of the New York Post reports that Mets starter Dillon Gee is drawing trade interest from three or four clubs. He adds that Jonathon Niese and Bartolo Colon aren’t likely to be traded.

Gee, 28, settled with the Mets on a $5.3 million salary for the 2015 season, per a report from ESPN’s Adam Rubin. He was entering his second of three years of arbitration eligibility. The right-hander finished the past season with a 4.00 ERA and a 94/43 K/BB ratio in 137 1/3 innings. He missed two months between May and July due to a strained latissimus dorsi in his right shoulder.

Mets “aggressively shopping” Dillon Gee

Dillon Gee Getty

Last week reports had the Mets active looking to deal Bartolo Colon, Dillon Gee, and/or Jon Niese, but now Adam Rubin of ESPN New York says they’re “aggressively shopping” Gee and are looking to deal him “more than the other starters.”

Which makes some sense, because Colon likely won’t bring back much in return and may require the Mets eating some salary, and Niese is under team control through 2018.

Gee, meanwhile, is under team control for two more seasons and projected to earn around $5 million for 2015 via arbitration. They may be able to actually get something decent in return for him and save some money to spend elsewhere.