Tag: Bartolo Colon

Noah Syndergaard

Noah Syndergaard to make major league debut for Mets on Tuesday


Update (7:00 PM EST): Syndergaard will start Tuesday for the Mets, Mike Puma of the New York Post reports. Bartolo Colon will move up to pitch Sunday against the Phillies in place of Gee, who was placed on the 15-day disabled list.

Jared Diamond of The Wall Street Journal reports that Mets manager Terry Collins could use a spot starter at some point in the next 20 games. That very well could mean pitching prospect Noah Syndergaard would get the call from Triple-A Las Vegas to make his major league debut.

Syndergaard, 22, has been terrific in his first five starts of the season, posting a 1.82 ERA with a 34/8 K/BB ratio in 29 2/3 innings. The right-hander, acquired from the Blue Jays in the R.A. Dickey trade, entered the season rated as the ninth-best prospect in baseball according to Baseball Prospectus.

Oh, and Syndergaard can apparently rake, too.

Mets starter Dillon Gee is currently dealing with a groin issue, per ESPN’s Adam Rubin. As a result, he is unlikely to make his next start on Sunday against the Phillies. That’s one possible opening for Syndergaard.

And That Happened: Tuesday’s scores and highlights

Carlos Perez

Angels 5, Mariners 4: Have yourself a major league debut, Carlos Perez:


The 24-year-old catcher singled in his big league debut and then led off the ninth with this shot to win it for the Angels. He’s the first player to hit a walkoff homer in his debut since Miguel Cabrera did it in 2003. Not bad company.

Marlins 2, Nationals 1: Mat Latos and four relievers combined on a three-hitter. Stephen Strasburg left the game early for Washington with a pinch in his shoulder blades which his manager said has been bugging him lately. Matt Williams said after the game that “we’ll have to have the chiropractor look at him.” After that I suppose they’ll give him a Balsam Specific, some Smeckler’s Powder and, while they’re burning money, a Curative Galvanic Belt too. All of which is way better than what they did back when Williams himself played and guys were bled by leeches to be have him rid of all of their bad humours.

Red Sox 2, Rays 0: The Red Sox had only five hits, but two of them were Mookie Betts homers. Given that Rick Porcello tossed eight shutout innings, that was plenty. Check out the 1975 throwbacks the Sox wore:


They don’t look that great on Betts because he is neither (a) fat; nor (b) wearing a pullover that is a size too small, which was the style in the mid-70s. Plus, I seriously doubt he has big, blown-dry hair under that cap and almost certainly doesn’t smoke. Meanwhile, some guy whose heyday was 1975 is complaining about how today’s athletes can’t compare to the guys 40 years ago.

Braves 9, Phillies 0: Shelby Miller needed only 99 pitches to shut out the Phillies. Like, a real honest-to-goodness nine-inning shutout like the pitchers used to throw 40 years ago back when the athletes were way better than today. Miller, by the way, is 4-1 with a 1.66 and a 31/14 K/BB ratio in 38 innings. I still hated to see Jason Heyward go, but Miller has been a good pickup and by far the most reliable Braves pitcher this year.

Dodgers 8, Brewers 2: Zack Greinke allowed only an unearned run while pitching into the eighth, striking out seven. He also hit a double and flipped is bat like he was Yasiel Puig or something:


All of your “but the NL has better strategy!” arguments will never sway me, but pitchers flipping their bats and strutting around like they own the place after they get hits might.


Reds 7, Pirates 1: Marlon Byrd homered and drove in four. His RBI double put the Reds up by six runs, which led to some serious profundity from manager Bryan Price, who said “it’s a lot easier to manage a game with a six-run lead than a one-run lead or being down a run.” Really makes you think, man.

Yankees 6, Blue Jays 3: Eight shutout innings for Michael Pineda before the bullpen, uncharacteristically, allowed some late damage. Mark Teixeira hit a two run homer and A-Rod doubled in a run. Which, again, is the Yankees’ recipe for success this year: Pineda stepping up and the old guys not looking so old.

Mets 3, Orioles 2: Bartolo Colon became the first pitcher to beat the same opponent while playing for seven different teams. He didn’t get the chance to do it in his half season in Montreal, but you figure he would’ve beaten them there too. And while, yes, Greinke’s double and bat flip — plus Doug Fister getting a pinch-hit single in the Nats game — may bolster the NL rules argument, this still happened last night:


White Sox 5, Tigers 2: Jeff Samardzija allowed only two runs in seven innings, bouncing back from that bad start in an empty Camden Yards. The Chisox’ throwbacks looked better than the Red Sox’ by the way, because these throwbacks are always amazing:


Royals 5, Indians 3: More like Eric Homer, amirite? God, I’m sorry I even said that. That’s bad. But you know damn well someone has called him that at some point. Anyway, Hosmer had a three-run shot. Jason Vargas was touched by a Michael Brantley homer but otherwise cruised for six innings.

Athletics 2, Twins 1: Another strong starting pitching performance on a night with many, this one from Jesse Chavez who allowed only an unearned run in seven and a third. Billys Butler and Burns provided offense, with the former notching two hits and an RBI and the latter adding two hits and a stolen base.

Rangers 7, Astros 1: Probably the least-apt “against his old mates” game ever, as the Astros with Wandy Rodriguez back in 2012 may have been a team of Martians or Daleks or mole people or something compared to the roster they have now. Hell, you can’t even say he pitched against his old laundry, as the uniforms are all different too. Either way, Rodriguez allowed only one run over eight innings against his old club. At least assuming they didn’t reorganize and become some weird LLC or holding company or something since he left.

Cardinals 7, Cubs 4: Matt Carpenter hit a three-run homer and drove in four overall as the Cards win their eighth in a row. Mitch Harris, a 29-year-old rookie and former Navy lieutenant got his first career win. The post-game pie in the face or beer shower doesn’t really compare to shellback initiations, I assume.

Giants 6, Padres 0: Ryan Vogelsong tossed seven innings of three-hit ball and the Giants won their fifth in a row. Third straight by shutout. That’s 20-straight scoreless innings for the Padres, who actually have a bit of lumber at their disposal.

Diamondbacks vs. Rockies: POSTPONED: Rain, feel it on my finger tips
Hear it on my window pane
Your love’s coming down like
Rain, wash away my sorrow
Take away my pain
Your love’s coming down like rain

Yeah, that’s Madonna. Wanna fight about it? Madonna is awesome.

And That Happened: Tuesday’s scores and highlights

Dan Uggla

Nationals 13, Braves 12: You’d think that all of the money the Braves are paying Dan Uggla that he’d treat them with more respect than to hit a clutch three-run homer to complete a huge comeback against them. The nerve.

Seriously, though: while I don’t much care for Uggla and he was frustrating when he played for my team, I don’t hold him sucking while in Atlanta against him personally. Some do. Many do. Many in Atlanta these past two days booed him and felt bile. Why? Do they think he enjoyed sucking? Enjoyed losing his job and then being released? Of course he didn’t. He probably felt way worse about it than y’all did. Glad he’s gone, but he hasn’t deserved the sort of hatred you see of him among some Braves fans.

I’d rather Uggla hit this homer in a losing cause because, again, he’s playing my team. But if the Braves had to lose this game — and don’t even get me started about their crap defense and bullpen which caused them to — good for him for having a great moment in the ballpark that has been a house of horrors for him. I don’t believe it will turn him back into an All-Star or anything, but even so, he’ll remember this all of his life and have at least one good memory of the past few years of his career instead of nothing but bad ones. We should want human beings who have experienced some challenges to have good moments like that on the other side.

Blue Jays 11, Red Sox 8: Like a mini-Nats-Braves game, with the home team jumping out to a lead — here it was just 4-0 — and the road team roaring back against a bad pitching staff. Marco Estrada was the hero here for the Jays, entering the game in the fifth inning with nobody out and the bases loaded — walking in one guy but otherwise limiting the damage — and then going on to pitch three innings of hitless ball. The Sox can take solace in the fact that the Jays have beat the heck out of every pitching staff — they lead the league in runs per game — but it’s hard to imagine how Boston’s pitching could be much worse.

Royals 11, Indians 5: Yet another come-from-behind, big offense game. Kendry Morales hit a three-run homer capped a six-run seventh inning. Alex Gordon homered and drove in two. The Indians have lost 8 of 11 and possess the worst record in the AL.

Mariners 2, Rangers 1: In one of the more nerdy/embarrassing things I’ll ever admit to on this blog, I have had, ever since I was a kid . . . Thomas Jefferson fantasies. No, it’s not a sex thing. And I don’t know why it’s Thomas Jefferson over any other historical figure, but it is. Anyway, here’s the thing: I imagine that Thomas Jefferson was suddenly zapped to the present and is hanging out with me. My job is to attempt to explain the present to him and show him things like air travel and computers and modern cities and stuff like that. He asks me questions about them and I try to answer. I assume that I started doing this as some sort of means of challenging myself to explain my world in terms that do not assume prior knowledge. An intellectual, pedagogical game or whatever. And, again, I have no idea why it’s Thomas Jefferson, but it is. Anyway, I’ve done this since I was ten or eleven years old and still catch myself doing it sometimes.

The whole point of that is to say that, if we swapped out Thomas Jefferson for Walter Johnson or someone, we could play that game with baseball and try to explain to him how it took six pitchers for the Mariners to win a game in which they allowed only one run to the Rangers.

Cubs 6, Pirates 2: The Cubs have won their fourth in a row. Dexter Fowler had three hits and two RBIs, Travis Wood tossed seven strong innings. Conversation had after this game. One of these comments actually happened, as reported in the game story:

Mongol General: Hao! Dai ye! We won again! This is good, but what is best in life?

Mongol: The open steppe, fleet horse, falcons at your wrist, and the wind in your hair!

Mongol General: Wrong! Conan! What is best in life?

Conan: Crush your enemies! See them driven before you! Hear the lamentations of their women!

Mongol General: Wrong! Joe Maddon! What is best in life?

Joe Maddon: I love two-out runs, man. They really hurt the other side badly. When you get ’em, there’s nothing more glorious than that.

Mongol General: That is good! That is good!


Yankees 4, Rays 2: A win, but one overshadowed by the news that today’s scheduled starter, Masahiro Tanaka, has to go on the DL. Chase Whitley started here — it was just supposed to be a spot start — but it turned out to be an audition for a regular slot in the rotation. It went well, with Whitley allowing six hits and one run in five innings. That’s 10 of 12 for New York.

Reds 4, Brewers 2: This Brewers loss allowed MLB.com’s Anthony Castrovince to offer up the joke/factoid of the night:

Johnny Cueto allowed two runs in eight innings, needing only 85 pitches. Joey Votto homered. He’s hitting .316/.429/.645 on the year and is on a 50+ home rune, 130+ RBI pace.

Marlins 4, Mets 3: The Marlins have won six of seven, this one thanks to Michael Morse’s tiebreaking RBI single in the eighth. Dee Gordon got two more hits. He’s batting .400 on the year.

Twins 3, Tigers 2: My girlfriend, a Tigers fan, hasn’t been able to see a lot of games yet this year because (a) the Tigers have played a lot of day games; and (b) they’ve played the Indians a lot and they’re blacked out on her MLB.tv here in Ohio. But she watched the game last night and offered this observation to me over Gchat: “I cant be the only one that finds it hilarious that Mike Pelfrey is good now that he’s with the Twins of all teams.” It is kind of hilarious, even if it may not last. Here he allowed one earned run in seven innings and the Twins won a back and forth affair. Kurt Suzuki had two hits and the go-ahead single in the seventh inning.

Cardinals 11, Phillies 5: Welcome to the big leagues, Severino Gonzalez. The Phillies starter allowed seven runs on ten hits and didn’t make it out of the third inning. Matt Carpenter tripled and doubled and scored three times. Mike Matheny juggled the batting order for this one and I imagine people will credit the offensive outburst for that, but really, I feel like this was more of a Severino-driven kind of thing.

Diamondbacks 12, Rockies 5: The Archie Bradley ball-to-the-face thing was the big story here, but thank goodness he walked off under his own power. They’ll make an assessment of him today, but he’s probably going on the DL. Offensively, things went much better: Mark Trumbo went 4 for 4 with a two-run homer and a two-run triple. Paul Goldschmidt went 3-for-3 with three RBI.

Athletics 6, Angels 2: The Angels jumped out to a 2-0 lead but the A’s took it right back with five in the bottom of the first. After that it was the Sonny Gray show. The A’s ace went eight innings, striking out six and allowing only those two first inning runs. Jered Weaver endured that bad first inning himself to last seven innings, but he’s having himself a terrible start to the year.

Giants 2, Dodgers 1: Kershaw vs. Bumgarner. Advantage: Bumgarner. The Giants notched two early runs off of the reigning MVP, but that’s all they’d need as the reigning World Series MVP allowed only one run and struck out nine in eight innings. Buster Posey did all of the damage here, with a solo homer and an RBI single. So yeah, the outcome here was determined by star power.

Astros 14, Padres 3: George Springer homered and drove in five runs. Jose Altuve had four hits. The Astros won again. Time to take them seriously, folks.

White Sox vs. Orioles: POSTPONED:  After two postponements, these two teams will play today at 2:05 Eastern. Except the game will be closed to the public. No fans. Empty seats. I put the over/under on guys describing this as “surreal” at 15, because that’s the go-to word these days for odd or different. Or, in some cases “too real,” but that’s another rant. And while all of this is occasioned by some really unfortunate events in Baltimore, let us look on the bright side. If one brave person can manage to sneak into the stands at Camden Yards undetected, and can sit in an empty, cavernous stadium for even a moment before he is caught, he will have the opportunity to offer the greatest “YOU SUCK!” in baseball history. Please, God, make this happen.