Tag: Avisail Garcia

Jacob deGrom

And That Happened: Thursday’s scores and highlight


Mets 2, Brewers 0: Jacob deGrom was fantastic, pitching eight shutout innings. He kind of had to given the Mets’ offense these days.

White Sox 8, Tigers 7: Tied in the tenth, Joba Chamberlain came into the game. The White Sox weren’t impressed. Melky Cabrera walked, Chamberlain hit Avisail Garcia with a pitch, J.B. Shuck’s hit an infield single to shortstop and then Carlos Sanchez tripled into right to clear the bases and put Chicago ahead 8-5. The Tigers plated two in the bottom half but two was not enough.

Orioles 8, Red Sox 6: The Orioles put up a a six-run fourth inning, capped by a Matt Wieters two-run homer. J.J. Hardy had a two-run double and Steve Pearce had three hits. The bigger deal for Baltimore is that Miguel Gonzalez came off the DL and made it through five innings. Not five great innings — he gave up four runs — but five healthy innings.

Athletics 6, Rangers 3: The sweep for Oakland. The A’s have won five in a row and, while they still have a pretty poor record and have a ton of teams ahead of them, they are only six games out of the wild card. Everyone is assuming they’ll have a fire sale. With parity and two wild cards, does anyone have a fire sale anymore? At least in the middle of the season?

Dodgers 4, Cubs 0: The Dodgers’ rotation does not look like they thought it would before the season began, but occasionally they get some decent results. Carlos Frias gave them some yesterday, tossing five shutout innings before handing it over to the pen. Jon Lester gave up all four Dodgers runs and didn’t make it past the fourth inning. He hasn’t won in seven starts.

Rockies 6, Diamondbacks 4: Despite all of the runs scored in the first couple of games of this series, it was only 2-1 heading into the bottom of the eighth. Then Colorado put up a five-spot, kicked off with a Troy Tulowitzki pinch-hit homer. Dbacks pitchers walked five guys that inning, two intentionally. Putting guys on base in Colorado is a good way to die.

Giants 13, Padres 8: Brandon Belt hit two triples and the Giants had four in all, which is not the sort of thing you see everyday. Then again, you don’t get to play the Padres and their sub-par outfield every day. A couple likely would’ve been triples with anyone playing out there, but Matt Duffy’s came “past a diving Kemp.”  Brandon Belt’s second triple likewise went to right. It was over Kemp’s head and would’ve been over anyone’s, but it’s not like Kemp was The Flash getting to the ball and getting it back in.

Nationals 7, Braves 0: Man the Braves stink. That’s eight in a row they’ve dropped to Washington, whose starters have put up 41 and a third consecutive shutout innings. Now Max Scherzer is going to pitch against the poor-hitting Phillies, so expect more of the same. Or maybe even a Johnny Vander Meer.

Reds 5, Pirates 4: A pretty decent game from Brandon Phillips, who hit the go-ahead homer in the 13th inning and did this:


Todd Frazier had himself a decent game too, with three hits, including a tying homer in the seventh

Cardinals 5, Marlins 1: I’m sure the Cardinals have lost at some point this season, I just can’t really picture it in my mind. Lance Lynn came off the DL to toss six shutout innings. Pete Kozma came off the bench to go 3-for-3 and score two runs. St. Louis is basically the Terminator this year.

Astros 4, Yankees 0: The Astros won a game and didn’t hit any homers? Wild. Of course they didn’t need to with Dallas Keuchel tossing a six-hit shutout and striking out 12. Jose Altuve had three hits and scored three times. Evan Gattis drove in a couple.

The marginalization of Oswaldo Arcia

Oswaldo Arcia

There are currently seven major leaguers 24 and under with a career OPS+ over 100 in at least 500 at-bats.

167 – Mike Trout
135 – Bryce Harper
108 – Manny Machado
105 – Christian Yelich
104 – Oswaldo Arcia
103 – Avisail Garcia
101 – Nolan Arenado

Six of those guys are considered building blocks by their teams. The other, Arcia, seems to be at a career crossroads already, even though he’s hardly tasted failure at any point in his career.

Arcia arrived in the majors before his 22nd birthday, debuting in April 2013. He was demoted a few times that season, even though his numbers were decent, if unspectacular, throughout. He finished up at .251/.304/.430 with 14 homers in 351 at-bats.

The next spring, Arcia was penciled right in as the Twins’ right fielder, only to develop wrist troubles very early on. He was placed on the DL on April 9. He went on to excel in his rehab assignment, hitting .308/.349/.487 in 12 games, yet the Twins optioned him to Triple-A for a spell anyway. He came back in late May and played regularly the rest of the way, finishing up at .231/.300/.452. Despite the low average, he had a 108 OPS+, largely because of his 20 homers (second on the Twins).

After last season, the Twins took away Arcia’s position by signing Torii Hunter, but he was still seemingly assured the left field job. However, weird things happened right off the bat. The left-handed-hitting Arcia started Opening Day against lefty David Price, only to find himself on the bench against a righty three days later. Arcia went on to sit three times in the first nine games. He slumped. He only started to pull out of it at the end of April, going 7-for-13 with a homer in four starts. That’s what a hip injury put him on the disabled list.

Despite that promising surge, it was apparent right away that Arcia might not immediately reemerge in Minnesota’s plans following his return. For one thing, the team needed a break from playing three liabilities in the outfield, as it often was with Arcia in left, Jordan Schafer in center and Hunter in right. Arcia’s struggles against lefties and his strikeout rate were also problems, even though he didn’t fan overly much during April (15 K’s in 65 PA).

Sure enough, Arcia was sent down after going hitless in the first four games of his rehab assignment. It’s the third time in three years he’s been optioned out. Whether it’s the hip, his frustrations over being buried or something else, he’s continued to slump since the demotion, hitting .214/.227/.310 in 12 games.

Arcia is a flawed player. The troubles against lefties aren’t going away, and he’s a poor outfielder perhaps best suited to DH duties. That seemed like a big problem at the start of the year, following Kennys Vargas’s emergence. But with Vargas also struggling to find his way with these 2015 Twins, there’s plenty of room for Arcia at DH should the team decide to go that route. Obviously, it hasn’t happened yet.

Still, it’s not at all reasonable that the Twins are so down on him. Beat writers have speculated that he’ll be traded. One writers suggested this spring that he should begin the season in the minors. Of late, there’s been more talk about prospect Miguel Sano becoming the Twins’ DH than Arcia. Oddly enough, Arcia is playing regularly in right field in Triple-A, even though the team surely won’t ask Hunter to change positions this year. It makes little sense. Right-handed power is difficult to come by these days, and young hitters as productive as Arcia rarely prove to be flops.

Maybe all of this turns around if Arcia turns it on in Triple-A over these next few weeks. After all, the Twins have given Shane Robinson two starts and Eduardo Escobar one start in left field over these last five games. Vargas has slumped since his return from Triple-A and has no sort of handle on the DH job. It’s not hard to imagine Arcia spending the final three months of the season as one of the Twins’ best hitters. Unfortunately, it’s also not hard to imagine him getting traded for a veteran security blanket as the Twins try to gear up for a playoff run.

Settling the Score: Monday’s results

CHICAGO, IL - MAY 8: Chris Sale #49 of the Chicago White Sox pitches against the Houston Astros during the first inning on June 8, 2015 at U.S. Cellular Field in Chicago, IL. (Photo by Jon Durr/Getty Images)

All eyes were on top prospect Carlos Correa for his major league debut on Monday night, but White Sox left-hander Chris Sale stole the show with another dominating outing.

Despite waiting out multiple rain delays, Sale struck out a season-high 14 batters over eight innings of one-run ball as part of a 3-1 victory over the Astros.

Sale allowed just five hits and one walk, with the lone run scoring after Correa beat out an infield single in the top of the fourth inning. Correa was originally ruled out on the play, but it was overturned following a replay challenge.

As for Chicago’s offense, Melky Cabrera got them on the board first with an RBI single in the bottom of the second inning before Avisail Garcia delivered a go-ahead two-run homer off Lance McCullers in the fourth which proved to be the difference in the ballgame.

Sale has been absolutely bonkers of late. He’s now the first pitcher since Pedro Martinez in 2001 to have three straight starts with at least 12 strikeouts. You are doing something pretty special when you are in that category.

Your box scores and recaps from Monday:

Astros 1, White Sox 3

Royals 3, Twins 1

Marlins 3, Blue Jays 11

Padres 5, Braves 3 (11 innings)

Phillies 4, Reds 6

Cardinals 3, Rockies 11

Diamondbacks 3, Dodgers 9

Brewers 2, Pirates 0

And That Happened: Sunday’s scores and highlights

Shelby Miller

Braves 6, Marlins 0: Shelby Miller has a no-hitter broken up with one out to go. Sorry kid. Still, a 94-pitch shutout is nothin’ to sneeze at. It’s something that even has a cool name. And let the record reflect that Miller is 4-1 with a 1.60 ERA in seven starts while Jason Heyward is hitting .252/.310/.382. I’d rather have the Cardinals’ record than the Braves, but so far the Braves are winnin’ that trade.

Orioles 3, Angels 0: Mike Wright’s major league debut: seven and a third innings pitched, four hits no runs and his first big league strikeout came on a swing-and-miss by Mike freakin’ Trout. Not bad!

And since we mentioned a debut, let’s mention a finale. I won’t give anything too major away here in case people haven’t seen it, but I’m OK with how “Mad Men” ended. The big thing to remember: you don’t spend eight years pounding the twin ideas of cynicism and people’s powerlessness to change and then suddenly give your main character enlightenment or transcendence or something. If Don Draper had done anything other than what he did here it would’ve been a nice payoff for fans, yes, but it also wouldn’t have served the show’s central ethos very well. So, I liked it. If you require crazy twists, stunning personal journeys and catharsis, “Mad Men” really wasn’t your kind of show to begin with.

Phillies 6, Diamondbacks 0: Sean O’Sullivan was hit way harder by his own catcher than he was by any Arizona Diamondbacks. The Dbacks managed only five hits off of him. Catcher Cameron Rupp hit O’Sullivan in the throat when he tossed the ball back to him. He was shaken for a second but stayed in the game, delivering one more pitch to complete his six innings of work. The Phillies have won five in a row, you guys.

Royals 6, Yankees 0: The Royals were powered by a battery: Edinson Volquez tossed three-hit ball for seven innings and Salvador Perez homered and drove in two. The third 6-0 game of the day. The seventh shutout in fifteen games overall. Everyone was gettin’ away for getaway day, I guess.

Giants 9, Reds 8: The first half of the line score here is sort of messy, as the Giants had a five-run lead early and squandered all but one run of it in the third. Crooked numbers and disorganization. The last half of the line score is very satisfying for the sort of person who likes symmetry and order, as each team scored one run a piece in the fifth, seventh and eighth, leaving that one-run margin for San Francisco. Brandon Belt homered Nori Aoki drove in three.

Mets 5, Brewers 1: Noah Syndergaard got his first career win, allowing one run over six innings and striking out five. He also beaned Carlos Gomez in the ear flap, scaring the hell out of everyone, but thankfully Gomez is OK. It also led to this bit of good sportsmanship.

Rays 11, Twins 3: The Rays rattled 19 hits off of Twins pitching to avoid the sweep. James Loney had four of those hits and three RBI. Chris Archer allowed only one run in six innings. Also: the way “Mad Men” ended TOTALLY keeps the idea of “Don invents ‘New Coke’ in 1985, ruining his career” speculation in play! McCann-Erickson did that campaign! Don pitched the Max Headroom “Catch the Wave!” commercial, everyone loved it and then it totally fizzled. Or, perhaps, Peggy did that while Don was off on some bender or another journey around the country. Don watches it fail, comes back and pitches “Coca-Cola Classic.” If I were AMC It’d throw a truckload of money at Matt Weiner to do that as a six-episode mini-series 10-15 years from now.

Astros 4, Blue Jays 2: Luis Valbuena and Colby Rasmus homered and Collin McHugh allowed two runs on six hits over seven innings and struck out nine. Mark Buehrle went the distance for Toronto and, though he lost, he served his second-best purpose and kept this game to a crisp two-hour, twenty-two minutes.

Pirates 3, Cubs 0: A.J. Burnett tossed seven shutout innings. Last August the dude said he’d probably retire, but came around to give it another go. Then in January he said he only had one more season left in him. So far, however, he’s 3-1 with a 1.38 ERA and a K/BB ratio of 43/18 in 52 innings. That’s the sort of thing that can change a man’s career plans.

Rangers 5, Indians 1: Mitch Moreland had a two-run homer and hit another ball off the top of the wall. Carlos Carrasco pitched all eight innings the Rangers batted, making him the second dude on the day to do that after Buehrle. Going the distance in a loss is the new inefficiency.

White Sox 7, Athletics 3: The sweep. The first White Sox sweep in Oakland since 1997. Avisail Garcia hit a two-run homer. Jeff Samardzija allowed three runs over eight.

Mariners 5, Red Sox 0: James Paxton tossed eight shutout innings. Kyle Seager homered, drove in two and scored twice. Everyone has talked about how the Red Sox’ starting pitching stinks, and it has, but the offense is no great shakes either, ranking 11th in the American League in runs per game and 14th in slugging percentage. And yet they’re only three and a half back because the American League East is kind of a hot mess. But some hot messes are fun, so who cares?

Dodgers 1, Rockies 0: Mike Bolsinger and three relievers combined to three-hit the Rockies. Kyle Kendrick limited Colorado to a run and three hits over seven innings, but he walked five and one of those walks put a man in scoring position prior to the RBI single which proved to be the only run in the game.

Nationals 10, Padres 5: Bryce Harper hit a three-run homer, tripled and drove in four on his 3-for-4 day. On the year he leads the National League in games, plate appearances, runs, home runs, walks, slugging percentage and OPS. Clearly overrated.

Cardinals 2, Tigers 1: Ausmus. Matheny. The battle of the Baseball’s Most Handsome Managers concluded with King Handsome Ausmus’ squad taking two of three from Prince Handsome Matheny’s squad. Matheny prevailed here, however, as Kolten Wong hit a tiebreaking home run in the sixth and Lance Lynn allowed only one run while pitching into the eighth and hit an RBI to [altogether now] help his own cause. This will not, however, alter the handsomeness standings as it was a non-title match. All bets are off if the Tigers and Cardinals meet in the World Series.

Jose Abreu sticks up for manager Robin Ventura

Robin Ventura

The White Sox lost their fifth game in a row on Sunday, falling 13-3 to the Twins. They’re now 8-14 in last place in the AL Central, a far cry from where prognosticators thought they’d be after an offseason in which they added Jeff Samardzija, Melky Cabrera, Adam LaRoche, David Robertson, and Zach Duke.

As a result of the failures of the White Sox, manager Robin Ventura has started to take some heat. First baseman Jose Abreu stuck up for his manager, though, urging people to blame the players, not the manager. Via Colleen Kane of the Chicago Tribune:

“We cannot blame Robin for the situation of the team,” Abreu said through a team interpreter Sunday morning. “It’s our fault because we are the ones who are playing. We are the people who are in the field.

“If the people want someone to blame, it’s the players, not Robin. He’s doing what he can do, but the results aren’t there.”

Among lineup regulars, Abreu and Avisail Garcia are the only ones with an above-average adjusted OPS (a.k.a. OPS+) at 139 and 119, respectively. The starting rotation has been a disaster as the 5.40 collective ERA is third-worst in the American League. It’s tough to see a way in which Ventura could have managed his team, with those results, to a better record than 8-14.