Tag: Arizona Diamondbacks

Albert Pujols

And That Happened: Monday’s scores and highlights


Angels 11, Red Sox 1; Angels 7, Red Sox 3: The Angels pick up their fourth and fifth wins in a row with lots of bombs helping the effort. Kole Calhoun, Albert Pujols and David Freese went long in game 1. In game 2 Pujols struck two more times, one of which pushed him past Mike Schmidt for 15th place all-time with his 549th career homer. He also took over the league lead from teammate Mike Trout who hit a measly one homer in the twin bill. Really, Trout, what’s wrong with you man? The Red Sox scored four runs in the four-game series, all coming in yesterday’s two games.

Nationals 7, Mets 2: The Nats didn’t have much trouble with Matt Harvey, who gave up five runs — four earned — on five hits in seven innings. The Mets left ten men on base and were 1-for-10 with runners in scoring position, which continued the pattern from Sunday’s 18-inning win. I suppose this will become a new hot button issue in the Mets’ press because the press LOVES to talk about teams who have trouble with runners in scoring position. The larger issue, however, is that hitters who aren’t very good don’t hit well with runners in OR out of scoring position.

Rockies 8, Rangers 7: A walkoff single for Rockies’ first baseman Ben Paulsen. In supplying a walkoff RBI single, a member of the Rockies who is otherwise anonymous to all but Colorado fans has a name. His name is Ben Paulsen. His name is Ben Paulsen. HIS NAME IS BEN PAULSEN. HIS NAME IS BEN PAULSEN.

Pirates 10, Royals 7: Travis Ishikawa has stunk on ice since the Pirates picked him up on waivers, but here he hit two doubles and a homer and drove in four runs. After the game he chalked it up to luck, saying that sometimes the pitcher makes a perfect pitch that still gets hit, sometimes the batter knocks the heck out of the ball but it still gets caught. He concluded by saying “tonight was just my night when the balls began to fall.” In other news, “When the Balls Began to Fall” sounds like, say, a second album from some moderately obscure alt-country guy who is a darling in the press but who can’t really connect with a larger audience. Hipsters like to say how much they like him even though “generally, [they] don’t care for country music. Except for Johnny Cash, of course.”

Phillies 5, Rays 3: David Buchanan won the game, allowing three runs on six hits in six and a third and then he was promptly sent down to Lehigh Valley because that’s the life of a fifth starter sometimes. Cesar Hernandez doubled, tripled and drove in two and Maikel Franco had a couple of hits and an RBI for the Phillies who have won four straight.

Tigers 5, Mariners 4: Ian Kinsler homered twice, the second of which was a go-ahead two-run shot in the eighth inning. The Tigers pulled back to .500. Though it may not matter. Come back to HBT later today as I’ll have the first of a three-part series about my recent visits to Detroit and a look at the Tigers as a team in transition.

Braves 7, Dodgers 5: Nick Markakis hit his first of the season. On July 20 which, well, OK. The Braves notched four runs and five hits in four innings off of their old friend Brandon Beachy, who was making his second post-Tommy John surgery start for L.A. Eury Perez threw out Adrian Gonzalez at the plate on a play that still counts as a nice one, even if Adrain Gonzalez is slower than your grandma:


Reds 5, Cubs 4: Three homers were hit by Reds batters — Todd Frazier, Jay Bruce and Marlon Byrd — with Frazier’s being his first that was not a part of a home run derby since last month. Not that it was all homers. Because this happened. Which, mercy:


Diamondbacks 3, Marlins 1: The Diamondbacks  snapped a six-game losing streak and gave the Marlins their fourth straight loss. So a lot of good stuff going on here. Shortstop Nick Ahmed had ten assists, some of them slicker than grease, and hit a triple as well. David Peralta drove in two.

Padres 4, Giants 2: Matt Kemp hit a two-run homer. Kemp 15-for-39 with 4 HR in his last 10 games. Guess he’s coming back to life, though it’s likely too little, too late.

HBT First-Half Awards: National League MVP


With no baseball on Wednesday or Thursday, we’re taking stock of the best performances of the first half of the season by handing out midseason awards. Maybe someday we’ll have the budget for an actual Midseason Award Trophy, but for now they merely get our kind and admiring words. Next up: National League MVP.

Aaron Gleeman‘s ballot:

1. Bryce Harper, Washington Nationals
2. Paul Goldschmidt, Arizona Diamondbacks
3. Andrew McCutchen, Pittsburgh Pirates

Bryce Harper leads the league in on-base percentage and slugging percentage–and is one point from the top batting average–while playing good defense in right field for the Nationals. He has some major competition from Arizona first baseman Paul Goldschmidt, but Harper’s nearly 100-point edge in slugging percentage and superior defensive value are enough to separate them for now. Goldschmidt is having a spectacular, MVP-caliber season, but Harper has been even better.

Deciding on the third spot was tough, because Giancarlo Stanton and Anthony Rizzo are deserving based on their great hitting and Andrew McCutchen, Buster Posey, Todd Frazier, Nolan Arenado, and A.J. Pollock are deserving based on their very good hitting combined with defensive value. I went with McCutchen, who won the MVP in 2013, finished third in 2014, and has hit .343 with a 1.033 OPS in his last 60 games after a brutal start to the season.

Craig Calcaterra‘s ballot:

1. Bryce Harper, Washington Nationals
2. Paul Goldschmidt, Arizona Diamondbacks
3. Buster Posey, San Francisco Giants

It’s really hard to do any other 1-2 in the NL MVP race than Harper and Goldschmidt. Harper leads the league in both on-base percentage and slugging percentage and is a single point behind Goldschmidt in average, if you care about such things. Which isn’t to slight Goldschmidt in the least — his 2015 season is better than a great many actual MVP seasons over the past couple of decades so far — it’s just that Harper is better than him in just about everything that matters. Goldschmidt has a couple more stolen bases and some RBIs, but that doesn’t amount to much. He also plays in a much better hitter’s park. Sorry, Goldy.

The real race for the MVP, such as it is, seems to be for the third slot. As Aaron said above, you can pick six or seven guys here, depending on your tastes. My tastes, like Aaron’s seem to be, are more about all-around greatness than merely batting numbers. I can’t, however, look past McCucthen’s slow start and give him the nod over someone like Buster Posey, who has hit fantastically and consistently while playing one of the most important defensive positions around. I give a different answer if you ask me which of them I’d want on my team starting tomorrow and going through the end of the year, but an award is, by definition, a retrospective thing and, with all due respect to Mr. McCutchen, you can’t erase the month of April.

deGrom dominates, Andrew McCucthen homers as the N.L. makes it 3-2 in the sixth

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CINCINNATI — The NL got a dominating new pitcher in the top of the sixth and began to claw back in the bottom half.

In the top of the sixth Jacob deGrom took over and, unlike Clayton Kershaw, had NO PROBLEM whatsoever. He was throwing straight nasty gas, striking out Steven Vogt on three pitches, Jason Kipnis on four pitches and Jose Iglesias on three. It was . . . impressive, to say the least.

Andrew McCutchen led off the bottom of the sixth and, on the first pitch from Chris Archer, launched a long homer to left field, bringing it to 3-2, National League. Archer was allowed to pitch to one more batter, retiring Todd Frazier, after which he was pulled for Zach Britton. Britton struck out Bryce Harper for out number two but then struggled a bit to close out the inning, allowing Paul Goldschmidt to reach when he fielded a ball and misfired, pulling Mark Texieria off the bag. Then Yadier Molina singled. Britton escaped, however, getting Troy Tulowitzki on a 4-6 grounder.

It’s the time of the game where the American League is out of its marquee pitchers and into its relatively anonymous relievers which Ned Yost chose, presumably to make this more like a real game. We’ll soon see if that pays off and if the AL can hold on.

Three innings in: the All-Star Game is tied at 1

Mike Trout

CINCINNATI — Three innings into the Mid-Summer Classic and it’s . . . OK I guess.

Sorry, still jacked from the Home Run Derby last night, realizing that a few tweaks turned an awful event into a great one. Now I’m thinking of what some tweaks would do to a merely boring event like the actual All-Star Game. Maybe get rid of the every-team-must-be-represented rule, pick 20-25 guys and play a real game?

Yeah, I know it’ll never happen — pitcher usage would be a problem — but we’re just starting the fourth inning and our fifth pitcher is in the game. They’re all so good. They all throw fire. Kind of makes things hoo-hum.

Not that we haven’t had some excitement so far. In the first inning Mike Trout hit a homer that just snuck over the right field wall on the fourth pitch of the game from Zack Greinke. Trout, by the way, was born six weeks before Guns N’ Roses’ “Use Your Illusion” albums came out. He’s so young and so good and he already has a lifetime All-Star Game cycle, having singled, doubled, tripled and homered in his appearances.

The NL came back in the bottom of the second, as Paul Goldschmidt hit a slow roller to third which Josh Donaldson air-mailed, allowing Goldschmidt to wind up on second. He reached third on a Buster Posey groundout and then came home when Jhonny Peralta singled.

Since then, not much happening. And on we go.

But really, Rob Manfred: let’s make this crazy like the Derby!