Tag: Arizona Diamondbacks

David Ortiz

And That Happened: Sunday’s scores and highlights


Red Sox 11, Tigers 1: David Ortiz had a monster game, hitting two homers and driving in seven. The game story says Ortiz was motivated by his emotional reaction to watching Pedro Martinez get inducted into the Hall of Fame earlier in the day. OK, we’ll go with that and not facing a struggling Shane Greene and one of the worst bullpens in baseball. In other news, last week it was reported that the Tigers would reassess whether they would be buyers or sellers after Sunday’s game. Well, you’ve played your Sunday game. Now, general manager Dombrowski of ours, I think it’s time you told your Don what everyone seems to know: this Tigers season is over.

Mets 3, Dodgers 2: Juan Uribe, acquired from the Braves Friday night, won the game with a walkoff single — which almost went out — in the 10th inning. Before that, however, the fans were treated to a duel between two of the game’s best pitchers in Zack Greinke and Jacob deGrom. Advantage: deGrom, as the Mets ace shut the Dodgers out into the eighth and struck out eight. Meanwhile, Greinke’s scoreless inning streak came to an end at 45 and two-thirds when deGrom knocked in a run on a fielder’s choice in the third. Here’s something weird: Jeurys Familia, who was trying for a four-out save, blew it. The weird part: it was his fourth blown save this year and the Mets have come back to win all four of them.

Angels 13, Rangers 7: Not sure what’s more impressive: Mike Trout hitting this grand slam or the fan catching it in his “Trout Net?”


Trout hit a solo homer in this one too and finished 4-for-4 with five driven in. He takes over the league lead in homers from teammate Albert Pujols. More importantly, the Angels end a three-game losing streak and regain first place over the Astros.

Giants 4, Athletics 3: By beating the A’s, Tim Hudson has now beaten every single team in baseball. Current team, anyway. I mean, he hasn’t beaten the original Buffalo Bisons, the Providence Grays or the Cincinnati Outlaw Reds, but that’s no slight on Hudson. He’s the 15th pitcher to do that. Matt Duffy hit a two-run homer in the first and drove in three runs to help Hudson’s cause.

White Sox 2, Indians 1: Carlos Rodon pitched shutout ball into the seventh inning helping the Chisox get the four-game sweep over a team I thought might turn things around after the All-Star break but, like, never mind. The Sox outscored the Indians 26-5 and never trailed in the series.

Orioles 5, Rays 2: Nolan Reimold had three hits and drove in two runs. Caleb Joseph hit a two-run homer. In five starts since coming back from Tommy John surgery, Matt Moore has yet to pitch longer than five innings. The Rays are skidding, having dropped eight of their last nine series.

Pirates 3, Nationals 1: Gerrit Cole won his 14th game — that leads the bigs — after allowing one run on seven hits in seven and two-thirds. According to the AP, Cole is the first Pittsburgh pitcher with 14 wins before August since Dock Ellis in 1971. Which is to say he is doing the do.

Royals 5, Astros 1: Last week Yordano Ventura was sent to the minors because he was lost and the Royals lost another pitcher in Jason Vargas due to Tommy John surgery. Last night they went to bed with Johnny Cueto on the team and Ventura having pitched seven innings of one-run ball against one of the best offenses in baseball. Not a bad turnaround.

Yankees 7, Twins 2: Nate Eovaldi won his tenth game, pitching into the ninth inning, and Chase Headley and Stephen Drew each homered. Headley drove in three. This a day after Alex Rodriguez hit three homers. Remember back in the winter when people wondered how those two would both work on this team? Haha, me neither.

Braves 3, Cardinals 2: Adonis Garcia broke the tie with a sixth inning homer. Which required me to go look up who in the hell Adonis Garcia was again. Sometimes it’s fun and enlightening when your team is rebuilding. Rookie Matt Wisler got the win and pitched well. Which was easier to do with Yadier Molina, Jhonny Peralta and Mark Reynolds taking the day off.

Phillies 11, Cubs 5: Man, not a great weekend for the Cubs. Not merely swept by the Phillies, but no-hit and blown out too. Aaron Nola got his first big league win and drove in a run and Ryan Howard homered for the second straight day. The Phillies have won eight of nine since the All-Star break. After the game Nola said “I’m just soaking as much as I can in right now and being a part of this is pretty amazing.” He’s talking about the 2015 Philadelphia Phillies, by the way.


Mariners 6, Blue Jays 5: Franklin Gutierrez hit a walkoff homer in the 10th. His comeback, a year after sitting out all year with a back condition, is pretty impressive so far. That’s his third homer in 19 games and he’s slugging .511. So good to see from a player who has been absolutely snakebitten with injuries and maladies. Of course this triple play was the highlight of the game:


Ezeiquel Carrera would’ve been safe if he didn’t fall off the bag. And otherwise he didn’t have a bad game — he robbed Mike Zunino of a home run and hit a solo homer of his own — but that one is gonna stick with him for a while.

Padres 3, Marlins 2: Justin Upton homered and Odrisamer Despaigne pitched six solid innings and the Padres win their third in a row and the fifth in the past eight games since the break. Have to figure they’re still sellers but winning does sort of mess up the narrative when it comes time to trade away everyone you just brought in to, you know, win.

Rockies 17, Reds 7: That thing about the Royals up above? The opposite for Cincinnati. They lost Johnny Cueto and then had their young pitcher get his rear end handed back to him. The Rockies hit five homers — two from Carlos Gonzalez — and had a ten-run third inning against Michael Lorenzen and Dylan Axlerod. Axlerod wore this one, giving up eight runs himself in an inning and a third.

Diamondbacks 3, Brewers 0: The Brewers were shut out by Dbacks pitchers for the second straight day. This day Jeremy Hellickson did the honors, tossing six shutout innings. Milwaukee scored just five runs in the four-game series.

The Diamondbacks are getting “lots of calls” on Brad Ziegler

ARLINGTON, TX - JULY 08:  Brad Ziegler #29 of the Arizona Diamondbacks pitches against the Texas Rangers in the bottom of the ninth inning at Globe Life Park in Arlington on July 8, 2015 in Arlington, Texas.  (Photo by Tom Pennington/Getty Images)

The Diamondbacks enter tonight’s action at 43-50, 9 1/2 games back in the NL West and 7 1/2 games back for a Wild Card spot. This should put them firmly in the “seller” category, so it’s no surprise that ESPN’s Jerry Crasnick reports that Arizona is getting “lots of calls” about veteran reliever Brad Ziegler. However, they are currently telling teams that they would have to be “overwhelmed” in order to move him.

Coming off microfracture knee surgery, Ziegler has a 1.08 ERA and 24/11 K/BB ratio over 41 2/3 innings this season. The sidearmer began the year in a set-up role, but has gone 15-for-17 in save chances since taking over the closer job from Addison Reed.

It’s a little silly for an out-of-contention team to take this sort of stance with a 35-year-old reliever, but keep in mind that his contract includes a reasonable $5.5 million club option (or a $1 million buyout) for next season. The Diamondbacks apparently won’t deal him unless they get a strong return.

Jose Fernandez beaned David Peralta. It was an accident, but the Dbacks retaliated anyway

David Peralta

Kevin Towers and Kirk Gibson may be gone, but the Dbacks’ you-hit-us-we-hit-you mentality lives on. Regardless of the fact that the “you hit us” in this case was clearly unintentional.

In last night’s Marlins-Dbacks game, Jose Fernandez hit David Peralta on the helmet with a pitch. Based on Fernandez’s reaction, the situation and the fact that there is no bad blood here to begin with, it was clearly an accident.

Yet despite that, the Diamondbacks were barking at Fernandez from the dugout as their teammate still lay on the ground. Specifically Turner Ward, who was ejected at the time.

Then, later, Dbacks pitcher Dominic Leone threw one at the backside of Christian Yelich, in what was clear retaliation. He was immediately tossed.

Watch all of that:


What on Earth motivated the Dbacks there is beyond me. Text messages from the old regime? Fear that Tony La Russa and Dave Stewart wouldn’t think that they were old school enough? Listen to the Dbacks announcers after Yelich is hit. They think there was nothing wrong with it and are all over the umpire, so apparently whatever it is motivating all of this permeates the organization.

Thankfully Peralta appears to be OK, with concussion tests coming back negative. I presume a scan of the brains of some of the Dbacks players would come back in much the same way.

And That Happened: Monday’s scores and highlights

Albert Pujols

Angels 11, Red Sox 1; Angels 7, Red Sox 3: The Angels pick up their fourth and fifth wins in a row with lots of bombs helping the effort. Kole Calhoun, Albert Pujols and David Freese went long in game 1. In game 2 Pujols struck two more times, one of which pushed him past Mike Schmidt for 15th place all-time with his 549th career homer. He also took over the league lead from teammate Mike Trout who hit a measly one homer in the twin bill. Really, Trout, what’s wrong with you man? The Red Sox scored four runs in the four-game series, all coming in yesterday’s two games.

Nationals 7, Mets 2: The Nats didn’t have much trouble with Matt Harvey, who gave up five runs — four earned — on five hits in seven innings. The Mets left ten men on base and were 1-for-10 with runners in scoring position, which continued the pattern from Sunday’s 18-inning win. I suppose this will become a new hot button issue in the Mets’ press because the press LOVES to talk about teams who have trouble with runners in scoring position. The larger issue, however, is that hitters who aren’t very good don’t hit well with runners in OR out of scoring position.

Rockies 8, Rangers 7: A walkoff single for Rockies’ first baseman Ben Paulsen. In supplying a walkoff RBI single, a member of the Rockies who is otherwise anonymous to all but Colorado fans has a name. His name is Ben Paulsen. His name is Ben Paulsen. HIS NAME IS BEN PAULSEN. HIS NAME IS BEN PAULSEN.

Pirates 10, Royals 7: Travis Ishikawa has stunk on ice since the Pirates picked him up on waivers, but here he hit two doubles and a homer and drove in four runs. After the game he chalked it up to luck, saying that sometimes the pitcher makes a perfect pitch that still gets hit, sometimes the batter knocks the heck out of the ball but it still gets caught. He concluded by saying “tonight was just my night when the balls began to fall.” In other news, “When the Balls Began to Fall” sounds like, say, a second album from some moderately obscure alt-country guy who is a darling in the press but who can’t really connect with a larger audience. Hipsters like to say how much they like him even though “generally, [they] don’t care for country music. Except for Johnny Cash, of course.”

Phillies 5, Rays 3: David Buchanan won the game, allowing three runs on six hits in six and a third and then he was promptly sent down to Lehigh Valley because that’s the life of a fifth starter sometimes. Cesar Hernandez doubled, tripled and drove in two and Maikel Franco had a couple of hits and an RBI for the Phillies who have won four straight.

Tigers 5, Mariners 4: Ian Kinsler homered twice, the second of which was a go-ahead two-run shot in the eighth inning. The Tigers pulled back to .500. Though it may not matter. Come back to HBT later today as I’ll have the first of a three-part series about my recent visits to Detroit and a look at the Tigers as a team in transition.

Braves 7, Dodgers 5: Nick Markakis hit his first of the season. On July 20 which, well, OK. The Braves notched four runs and five hits in four innings off of their old friend Brandon Beachy, who was making his second post-Tommy John surgery start for L.A. Eury Perez threw out Adrian Gonzalez at the plate on a play that still counts as a nice one, even if Adrain Gonzalez is slower than your grandma:


Reds 5, Cubs 4: Three homers were hit by Reds batters — Todd Frazier, Jay Bruce and Marlon Byrd — with Frazier’s being his first that was not a part of a home run derby since last month. Not that it was all homers. Because this happened. Which, mercy:


Diamondbacks 3, Marlins 1: The Diamondbacks  snapped a six-game losing streak and gave the Marlins their fourth straight loss. So a lot of good stuff going on here. Shortstop Nick Ahmed had ten assists, some of them slicker than grease, and hit a triple as well. David Peralta drove in two.

Padres 4, Giants 2: Matt Kemp hit a two-run homer. Kemp 15-for-39 with 4 HR in his last 10 games. Guess he’s coming back to life, though it’s likely too little, too late.

HBT First-Half Awards: National League MVP


With no baseball on Wednesday or Thursday, we’re taking stock of the best performances of the first half of the season by handing out midseason awards. Maybe someday we’ll have the budget for an actual Midseason Award Trophy, but for now they merely get our kind and admiring words. Next up: National League MVP.

Aaron Gleeman‘s ballot:

1. Bryce Harper, Washington Nationals
2. Paul Goldschmidt, Arizona Diamondbacks
3. Andrew McCutchen, Pittsburgh Pirates

Bryce Harper leads the league in on-base percentage and slugging percentage–and is one point from the top batting average–while playing good defense in right field for the Nationals. He has some major competition from Arizona first baseman Paul Goldschmidt, but Harper’s nearly 100-point edge in slugging percentage and superior defensive value are enough to separate them for now. Goldschmidt is having a spectacular, MVP-caliber season, but Harper has been even better.

Deciding on the third spot was tough, because Giancarlo Stanton and Anthony Rizzo are deserving based on their great hitting and Andrew McCutchen, Buster Posey, Todd Frazier, Nolan Arenado, and A.J. Pollock are deserving based on their very good hitting combined with defensive value. I went with McCutchen, who won the MVP in 2013, finished third in 2014, and has hit .343 with a 1.033 OPS in his last 60 games after a brutal start to the season.

Craig Calcaterra‘s ballot:

1. Bryce Harper, Washington Nationals
2. Paul Goldschmidt, Arizona Diamondbacks
3. Buster Posey, San Francisco Giants

It’s really hard to do any other 1-2 in the NL MVP race than Harper and Goldschmidt. Harper leads the league in both on-base percentage and slugging percentage and is a single point behind Goldschmidt in average, if you care about such things. Which isn’t to slight Goldschmidt in the least — his 2015 season is better than a great many actual MVP seasons over the past couple of decades so far — it’s just that Harper is better than him in just about everything that matters. Goldschmidt has a couple more stolen bases and some RBIs, but that doesn’t amount to much. He also plays in a much better hitter’s park. Sorry, Goldy.

The real race for the MVP, such as it is, seems to be for the third slot. As Aaron said above, you can pick six or seven guys here, depending on your tastes. My tastes, like Aaron’s seem to be, are more about all-around greatness than merely batting numbers. I can’t, however, look past McCucthen’s slow start and give him the nod over someone like Buster Posey, who has hit fantastically and consistently while playing one of the most important defensive positions around. I give a different answer if you ask me which of them I’d want on my team starting tomorrow and going through the end of the year, but an award is, by definition, a retrospective thing and, with all due respect to Mr. McCutchen, you can’t erase the month of April.