Tag: Alfonso Soriano

ichiro getty

Could the Yankees find a match for Ichiro Suzuki in the Phillies?


ESPN’s Buster Olney tweeted earlier that Ichiro Suzuki appears to be the odd man out in the Yankees’ outfield and adds that the Phillies could use outfield help. The Yankees, of course, will have recent free agent additions Jacoby Ellsbury and Carlos Beltran in center and right, respectively, and Brett Gardner in left. Alfonso Soriano would back up in either corner while Gardner can move back to center in a pinch.

The Phillies don’t have a starting spot for Ichiro, but could put him on the bench. GM Ruben Amaro said during the off-season that he prefers to have a left-handed hitting outfielder capable of playing center field, but those were scarce throughout the off-season. He did add Bobby Abreu, but outside of drawing a few walks, he has had a disappointing spring to date, hitting just .111 in 18 at-bats.

That being said, there doesn’t seem to be a strong match considering that the Phillies are right up against the $189 million luxury tax when everything is factored in. The Yankees would have to pay just about the entirety of his $6.5 million salary or take back an equally-expensive player in return, such as reliever Mike Adams ($7 million) who is recovering from a torn rotator cuff and two labrum tears.

The Phillies adding the 40-year-old to their roster, though, would make for a fresh source of age-related jokes at their expense.

Yankees considering using Alfonso Soriano as back-up first baseman

alfonso soriano getty

Over his 15-year career, Yankees outfielder Alfonso Soriano has logged time at five of the eight non-pitcher positions on the diamond. The only three positions he hasn’t played are catcher, first base and right field. He might make it six this season. ESPN’s Andrew Marchand reports that manager Joe Girardi has kicked around the idea of using Soriano at first base to spell Mark Teixeira from time to time.

“We have kicked it around a little bit,” manager Joe Girardi said.


Soriano, who will play in the outfield Friday night, will primarily be a designated hitter. However, he could spell Mark Teixeira from time to time during the season. The Yankees do not plan to carry strictly a backup first baseman.

Kelly Johnson, the team’s starting third baseman, is listed as the back-up first and second baseman. Given that Johnson is neither two nor three people, the Yankees would like to diversify their portfolio, so to speak, which explains brainstorming Soriano at first.

At the age of 37 last season, Soriano blasted 34 home runs and posted a .791 OPS with the Cubs and the Yankees. He moved back to the Bronx in a trade at the end of July. Soriano’s contract expires at the end of the season and he’s been mulling retirement.

Alfonso Soriano may retire after this year

Yankees' Soriano points as he crosses home plate in the fifth inning of their MLB American League baseball game the Angels in New York

Alfonso Soriano, who is still playing under that massive contract the Cubs gave him, says this year could be it:

Alfonso Soriano could join Derek Jeter in retirement following the end of the upcoming baseball season.

“It depends on how I feel,’’ Soriano said when asked by The Post if he wants to continue playing. “If I am healthy I will play [in 2015]. If not, I will let it go. It depends how I feel.’’

He’s not quite Jeter, obviously. His farewell tour will feature him getting gifts sort of like the ones you give your younger kid on your older kid’s birthday so the younger one doesn’t feel left out. A small game or a puzzle, perhaps. Maybe a little Lego set.

Alfonso Soriano sold his old place in Chicago for $2.9 million

Alfonso Soriano Getty

I know this is usually Calcaterra’s beat, but as someone moving in a couple weeks and currently trying to rent out his house this is also suddenly an area of interest for me too.

Alfonso Soriano’s old condo in Chicago has been on the market since September and the Chicago Tribune reports that he finally sold it … for $2.9 million.

According to the newspaper he originally bought the 3,828-square foot, 44th-floor penthouse–with two parking spaces!–in 2006 for $2.65 million and listed it for $2.95 million now, settling for slightly less after leaving it on the market for nearly six months.

A first in 15 years: 2014 will open without a member of the 500-HR club

Albert Pujols

With Alex Rodriguez spending the season on the restricted list, this season will be the first since 1999 to begin without a member of the 500-homer club on a major league roster.

The last time MLB was played without a 500-HR guy was 15 years ago. Eddie Murray retired after the 1997 season, leaving a void until Mark McGwire joined the 500-homer club in Aug. 1999.

Of course, one could say this is all semantics. After all, there were no 500-homer guys on an active roster last Opening Day either, though A-Rod was just on the disabled list then. And while Rodriguez won’t be on a major league roster this year, he certainly still qualifies as an active player.

Regardless, the 500-homer club won’t be empty for too long: Albert Pujols is just eight bombs away at 492. He is the lone candidate to get there this year, though. Adam Dunn (440), Jason Giambi (438) and Paul Konerko (434) are next on the list, and all are likely entering their final seasons. David Ortiz (431) has a shot if he can remain a full-time DH into 2016. Alfonso Soriano is at 406 as he enters his age-38 season. After Pujols gets there, it’s possible no one will join him until Miguel Cabrera, who is at 365 through age 30.

Prior to 1999, it wasn’t uncommon for the league to be without a 500-homer guy. There were none from the time Mike Schmidt retired in 1989 until Murray joined in Sept. 1996. There were also none from 1981-Sept. 1984, when Reggie Jackson hit his 500th. The current streak of having a 500-homer guy active is the longest in history. Before this, the longest was Sept. 1965, when Willie Mays got there, until 1976, when Hank Aaron and Frank Robinson retired.