Tag: Alexei Ramirez

Alexei Ramirez Getty

Report: Mets, Yankees, and Dodgers interested in White Sox shortstop Alexei Ramirez


Bruce Levine of CBS Chicago reports that the White Sox have heard from “numerous” teams regarding the availability of shortstop Alexei Ramirez. The Mets, Yankees, and Dodgers are among the teams in the hunt. All three teams have a clear need at shortstop, though Levine notes that the Mets have the young starting pitching that the White Sox would covet.

Ramirez, 33, batted .273/.305/.408 with 15 home runs, 73 RBI, and 21 stolen bases over 158 games this season and carries the reputation as a strong defender. He was selected to his first All-Star team back in July and he took home his second career Silver Slugger Award earlier this evening. His contract is quite reasonable, as he’s owed $10 million next season and has a $10 million team option for 2016 or a $1 million buyout. As a result, the White Sox should expect a strong market for his services as teams consider free agent shortstops Hanley Ramirez, Asdrubal Cabrera, Jed Lowrie, and Stephen Drew.

The White Sox don’t have an obvious in-house replacement if Ramirez is moved, but 2013 first-round pick Tim Anderson is in the minor league pipeline.

2014 Silver Slugger Award winners are announced

silver slugger getty

The 2014 Silver Slugger Awards presented by Louisville Slugger will be announced this evening (6:00 p.m. ET) during an hour-long special on MLB Network.

The Silver Slugger Award is given annually to the top hitter at each position in both the American League and the National League. Votes are cast by MLB’s coaches and managers. We’ll post the names of this year’s recipients as they are announced:

American League

First Base:

Jose Abreu, White Sox

Second Base:

Jose Altuve, Astros


Alexei Ramirez, White Sox

Third Base:

Adrian Beltre, Rangers


Mike Trout, Angels

Jose Bautista, Blue Jays

Michael Brantley, Indians


Yan Gomes, Indians

Designated Hitter:

Victor Martinez, Tigers


National League

First Base:

Adrian Gonzalez, Dodgers

Second Base:

Neil Walker, Pirates


Ian Desmond, Nationals

Third Base:

Anthony Rendon, Nationals


Andrew McCutchen, Pirates

Justin Upton, Braves

Giancarlo Stanton, Marlins


Buster Posey, Giants

Starting Pitcher:

Madison Bumgarner, Giants

Gold Glove finalists announced

gold glove award

Gold Glove award winners are announced November 4, but in the meantime Rawlings just named three finalists for each position in each league:

AL, catcher: Alex Avila, Yan Gomes, Salvador Perez
AL, first base: Eric Hosmer, Miguel Cabrera, Albert Pujols
AL, second base: Robinson Cano, Dustin Pedroia, Ian Kinsler
AL, third base: Josh Donaldson, Adrian Beltre, Kyle Seager
AL, shortstop: Alcides Escobar, J.J. Hardy, Alexei Ramirez
AL, left field: Alex Gordon, Michael Brantley, Yoenis Cespedes
AL, center field: Adam Jones, Adam Eaton, Jackie Bradley Jr.
AL, right field: Kole Calhoun, Kevin Kiermaier, Nick Markakis
AL, pitcher: Mark Buehrle, Felix Hernandez, Dallas Keuchel

NL, catcher: Jonathan Lucroy, Russell Martin, Yadier Molina
NL, first base: Adrian Gonzalez, Justin Morneau, Adam LaRoche
NL, second base: D.J. LeMahieu, Brandon Phillips, Chase Utley
NL, third base: Nolan Arenado, Juan Uribe, Pablo Sandoval
NL, shortstop: Zack Cozart, Adeiny Hechavarria, Andrelton Simmons
NL, left field: Justin Upton, Starling Marte, Christian Yelich
NL, center field: Billy Hamilton, Denard Span, Juan Lagares
NL, right field: Jason Heyward, Gerardo Parra, Giancarlo Stanton
NL, pitcher: Zack Greinke, Clayton Kershaw, Adam Wainwright

I stopped paying much attention to the Gold Glove awards a long time ago–somewhere between Rafael Palmeiro winning one as a designated hitter and Derek Jeter winning five as a shortstop–but feel free to complain about the finalists.

American League beats National League 5-3 in 2014 All-Star Game; Mike Trout named MVP

85th MLB All Star Game

source: Getty Images

MINNEAPOLIS, MN — In a season where offense has been hard to come by, the hitters weren’t all that fooled in the 2014 All-Star Game. At least not early on. And heck, even if they were, word on the street was that some pitchers were throwing meatballs to some hitters on purpose, so it’s hard to know what to take away from this one. We can say this much for absolute certain: the A.L. beat the N.L. 5-3.

Well, obviously we can take all of the Jeter stuff away. In an age when simplicity and dignity are often secondary concerns, Jeter’s exit from the Midsummer Classic was very welcome indeed. No speeches. No excessive stoppages of play. The tributes — at least the ones we could see in the ballpark — did not skew maudlin and treacly. It was much like we saw in that Nike commercial the other day: a lot of hat-tipping and nodding and that felt right.

But he was not named the MVP, contrary to what so many thought would happen no matter how he did. Rather, the MVP Award went to Mike Trout. Who, unlike was the case the past couple of years, won it thanks in part to the superior numbers even if he didn’t have the superior story.

As for the game itself, the Americans struck with three early thanks to Trout tripling in Jeter and Miguel Cabrera blasting one over the fence in the first. The Nationals struck back in the second thanks to back-to-back doubles by Chase Utley and Jonathan Lucroy. Lucroy, who is second in the National League in doubles with 32 so far, doubled again in the fourth to plate Dee Gordon and tie it up at three. Mike Trout struck again with an RBI double in the fifth which also advanced Alexei Ramirez to third. Ramirez then scored on a Jose Altuve sacrifice fly to make it 5-3, American League.

At that point things went the way they always tend to go at the All-Star Game these days: constant substitutions, an increasingly scary assortment of fresh relief pitchers who know they have two days off after this and a lot of shaky defense. No one broke through for anything after the fifth. The one nice thing from the tail end of the game was John Farrell giving Minnesota Twin — and Minnesota native — Glen Perkins the ninth inning. Perkins set the N.L. down 1-2-3 for the save.

Some random facts:

  • Jeter ends his All-Star Game career 13 for 27. It was his third All-Star Game with multiple hits, having done so in 2000 and 2004 when he went 3 for 3.
  • Lucroy’s two doubles ties an All-Star record. It’s one held by many, as nine dudes have done it overall, but Lucroy joins Albert Pujols, Barry Bonds, Paul Konerko, Damian Miller (really?!), Ernie Banks, Ted Kluszewski, Joe Medwick and Al Simmons in that club.
  • Adam Wainwright — who maybe shouldn’t have started! — gave up three runs in the first inning. In 19 starts this year he allowed just four first inning earned runs total. Of course, in those 19 starts he wasn’t facing multiple potential first-ballot Hall of Famers like Jeter, Cabrera and Trout.
  • Mike Trout is loving life in All-Star Games. He went 2 for 3 with two RBI here and is 4 for 7 with two doubles and a triple in his three All-Star Game appearances. Now he’s the MVP.

But the only stat that actually counts — at least, the only one we’re told to say counts — is the win. Which goes to the A.L. And, along with it, home field advantage in the World Series for the A.L. pennant winner.

Derek Jeter’s final, wonderful All-Star Game ends in the fourth inning

Derek Jeter


MINNEAPOLIS, MN — Derek Jeter’s final All-Star Game wasn’t half bad.

It started with a loud and long round of applause during player introductions and a louder and longer round when he made a very slick stop of an Andrew McCutchen ground ball in the top of the first. On a shot to his left, mind you, which is a play Jeter has not always made well. He made it well tonight, however, and even though he couldn’t quite get the speedy McCutchen at first — no one could, most likely — it was a very nice beginning to his game.

The nice beginning continued in the bottom of the first when he came to bat to a longer and louder round of applause. N.L. catcher Jonathan Lucroy and the home plate umpire took several steps back to give Jeter some time and the spotlight. But as is always the case with Jeter, he’d rather get down to business. He smiled and thanked the crowd, but he also looked back at Lucroy several times as if to say “Get your ass back in that box and let’s get on with this, will ya?” He wasn’t annoyed, but his demeanor was certainly consistent with what he’s been saying all week: he’s here for a baseball game, not a tribute.

Jeter then promptly laced a double off Adam Wainwright and came around to score on Mike Trout’s triple. Jeter is not a young man. He is not the player he once was. But on this night he looked like he could do this forever. He came up again in the bottom of the third and dropped a bloop single down the first base line that fell in between Paul Goldschmidt and Yasiel Puig. He took second on a wild pitch but was stranded there to end the inning.

Then: the departure. Jeter took his position at shortstop to start the top of the fourth.  But the game paused and Alexei Ramirez came running out to relieve him. They hugged at short, and Jeter jogged off the field to the largest ovation of the night, with “New York, New York” playing over the P.A. More hugs in the dugout and, finally, a curtain call. This whole process took close to five minutes. The applause did not stop. It didn’t even flag.

Jeter came into the league with a bang nearly 20 years ago. He’s certainly making a hell of an exit.