Tag: Adrian Gonzalez

Carlos Carrasco

And That Happened: Wednesday’s scores and highlights


Indians 8, Tigers 2: I’ve seen enough wrestling to know a work when I see one, and the Tigers not starting Miguel Cabrera against a team he routinely destroys was clearly a work designed to put the Indians over as a team that can actually, on occasion, beat the Tigers in a house show like this. Carlos Carrasco took a two-hit shutout into the eighth, but broke kayfabe to give up a two-run homer to J.D. Martinez.

Angels 2, Astros 1: A walkoff single for Taylor Featherston in the 13th. In other news, “Taylor Featherston” was the name I gave my villain character in the 1980s teen comedy screenplay I wrote that time. He was a rich kid on the swim team who competed with our John Cusackian hero for the affections of, umm, let’s say Lea Thompson. Why everything got resolved based on the results of a big swim meet is beyond me — and why were there cheerleaders at a swim meet? — but a writer has to conform to the conventions of his genre.

Nationals 2, Braves 1: Ian Desmond with a walkoff sac fly in the 11th as the Nats beat the Braves for the [frantically mashes keys on a calculator] 264th straight time. The sac fly was made possible by Dana Eveland loading the bases by giving up a double to Bryce Harper and walking two guys, one intentionally. This is Eveland’s worst work since he played the femme fatale in that truly misguided RKO noir from 1951, “Farewell my Tomato Can.”

Blue Jays 1, Rays 0: Marco Estrada took a perfect game into the eighth, thanks in part to a fantastic catch by Josh Donaldson. You don’t figure the Jays to win a lot of 1-0 games this year, but when everything breaks right oddities can occur.

Yankees 10, Phillies 2: Ivan Nova came off the DL to tame the Phillies. Not that taming the Phillies is particularly hard, Monday and Tuesday’s results notwithstanding. Cole Hamels had himself a not too great day, but given how little support he’s gotten from his teammates this year he’s allowed to mail one in once in a dang while. Save it for the contender you’re traded to, Cole. Don’t burn yourself out for these guys.

Twins 6, White Sox 1: It was Phil Hughes’ birthday yesterday. Working on your birthday is lame, but Hughes made it work, allowing one run over eight innings. Chris Sale reached double digits in strikeouts once again — it was the seventh straight time he did it, which is the longest streak since Randy Johnson did back in 2001 — but strikeouts ain’t enough in and of themselves. Sale lost to the Twins for the third time this year.

Reds 5, Pirates 2: A four-run first inning off of Gerrit Cole is not the sort of thing we’ve come to expect, but the Reds did it anyway. Cincinnati is about the only team who has gotten to Cole this year, actually. They scored three off of him on April 8, three off of him on May 6 and these five last night. No other team has scored three runs off Cole even once this year.

Red Sox 5, Orioles 1: A five-run sixth inning which included a David Ortiz homer powered the Sox to victory, but it was something of a Pyrrhic one, as Dustin Pedroia (hamstring) and Hanley Ramirez (bruised hand) each left with injuries. The Sox have won five of eight.

Cardinals 6, Marlins 1: Stop me if you’ve heard this one before, but Giancarlo Stanton hit a homer but the Marlins were otherwise stopped cold. Jason Heyward homered for the third straight game. Jamie Garcia stifled the non-Stanton Marlins and even singled and scored. His ERA is down to 1.69.

Dodgers 5, Cubs 2: Justin Turner and Adrian Gonzalez homers helped snap the Cubs’ four-game winning streak. Turner surprised everyone with his .340/.404/.493 season last year. This year he’s hitting .323/.392/.575.

Athletics 8, Rangers 2: Four straight for Oakland, as Brett Lawrie hit a grand slam in their five-run first and never looked back. That was plenty of run support for Kendall Graveman. Which made me think of the word “gravamen” which is one of those words more people should use but don’t.

Brewers 4, Mets 1: Seven straight losses for the Mets as Jimmy Nelson held them to two hits over eight innings. After the game Terry Collins held a closed-door meeting with his team. Which I will never think about the same way again after what I read yesterday.

Diamondbacks 8, Rockies 7: Arizona rallied after being down two in the ninth, thanks in part to Yasmany Tomas’ RBI single — his fourth hit in the game — and a bases-loaded walk to Jarrod Saltalamacchia. These two teams have combined for 30 runs in two games. They play again today. If you are walking around Denver and see any baseball players getting breakfast this morning, the pitchers are the ones looking kind of sick and ordering dry toast.

Royals 8, Mariners 2: Mike Moustakas hit a two-run home run and Omar Infante had a three-run double as the Royals put up a seven-spot in the fourth inning. After the game, Eric Hosmer said “This is great for a team that’s built off pitching and defense.” Secret: no truly good teams are built solely on pitching and defense. What changed the Royals from lighting-in-a-bottle team in 2014 to strong contender in 2015 is the fact that they hit now.

Giants 6, Padres 0: Buster Posey hit a grand slam as the Giants cruised. Posey was playing first base as Brandon Belt covered left field. Posey hit a grand slam last Friday too.

The Dodgers’ charter plane had to make an emergency landing last night


The Dodgers were leaving San Diego and heading to Texas, but they had to make an unexpected stop back in Los Angeles last night after their charter plane was diverted to LAX due to a mechanical issue.

There was no official word on what happened, but on his Instagram page infielder/amateur airline mechanic Justin Turner said it was a stabilizer problem. Which is kind of scary because stabilizers are somewhat more important to airplanes than, say, the little fan above your seat or the toilet at the front of the plane outside of which you’re not allowed to line up.

Adrian Gonzalez:

Happy because of the win, not happy because of the delay.

The Dodgers got a new plane and then made it on to Texas.

And That Happened: Sunday’s scores and highlights

Miguel Cabrera


Ah, it’s good to be back. If you’re curious about where I was, you can read what I wrote about it here, here, here, here, here, here, here, here, and here. If you’re not curious, well, let’s get right back into it, shall we?

Tigers 8, Indians 1: All Miguel Cabrera does is hit 450+ foot homers against the Indians. He did it on Friday and again here yesterday, this time tagging Corey Kluber. Also, if you ever visit Miguel Cabrera’s house, ask him to show you the bill of sale for when he acquired Kluber. For he certainly owns him: he’s 20-for-35 with five homers against him in his career.

Mets 10, Braves 8: The Braves were up five at one point, but the Mets just bashed the living hell out of them to come from behind. Four homers in all for New York, including Juan Lagares’ go ahead three-run homer in the sixth to cap the scoring in a game that looked like the American League circa 2000. Oh, and I should note that Dana Eveland pitched in this one for the Braves. He was acquired by them while I was gone, and I did not get to make mention of it. Long time readers will know of my fascination with Eveland and the fact that he has the EXACT name I would use if I was a pretty young starlet in 1940s Hollywood. And which I bet at some point some starlet did use, only she didn’t make it big because she wouldn’t sleep woth Howard Hughes or some such thing and got buried in RKO B-movies. Sure, she came back once in a “Murder, She Wrote” episode in the late 80s and John Waters stunt-casted her a couple of times, but it wasn’t much of a career, frankly.

Rockies 4, Marlins 1: I’ll always remember where I was when Jorge De La Rosa passed Aaron Cook for the all-time Rockies franchise win record. Specifically, I was . . . um. Wait. I did some laundry yesterday. And I met some friends for an early dinner. Hmm, not sure when this game ended so I can’t really be sure. OK, guess I won’t always remember where I was, but that doesn’t mean it didn’t happen. Charlie Blackmon and Nolan Arenado homered in this one.

Dodgers 4, Padres 2: Adrian Gonzalez drove in three, including a two-run single in the top of the 12th to put the Dodgers over. I did not say “put them ahead,” because I wanted to use a wrestling term there in honor of the Late, Great Dusty Rhodes who died last week. I don’t follow wrestling now but I sure as hell followed it back in the mid-80s and Georgia/Mid-Atlantic was my circuit of choice. Rhodes owned that world, jack, telling us all about “Hard Times” and lamenting the time Baby Doll — that Jezebel! — spent $5,000 of his hard-earned dollars on assorted men and papaya juice. RIP, American Dream.


Rays 2, White Sox 1: Asdrubal Cabrera hit a two-run homer off Chris Sale in the seventh and that’s all the Rays would need. Which was unfortunate given how well Sale pitched otherwise, striking out 12 and allowing only two hits apart from that mistake to Cabrera. Sale was clearly tiring, however and finished that inning with 125 pitches on the day.

Yankees 5, Orioles 3: The Yankees kept pace and maintained their percentage points lead over Tampa Bay with a victory here. Free passes helped key the Yankees’ rally. Two Orioles pitchers managed four straight walks to force in a run and then John Ryan Murphy hit a two-run double.

Blue Jays 13, Red Sox 5: The last time I did an “And That Happened” was ages ago. June 3, to be exact. And that is the last time anyone around here was able to write about a Blue Jays’ loss, which last happened the evening before. Now it’s 11 straight for Toronto, and they stand only a game behind the Yankees and Rays. Some things are the same as before I went on my little trip: the Red Sox sucked then and they suck now. Ryan Goins homered, doubled and drove in five in this one.

Pirates 1, Phillies 0: Josh Harrison drove in Neil Walker with two outs in the bottom of the 11th for the win, but it was really A.J. Burnett and Cole Hamels who owned the day. Burnett pitched nine, shutting out the Phillies in regulation on five hits. Hamels only went seven but he too shut out the opposition, striking out 12. It’s a shame neither of them figured in the decision and one of their team’s had to come out on the losing end.

Nationals 4, Brewers 0: Max Scherzer must’ve been feeling right yesterday: 1 hit, 16 strikeouts and the complete game shutout. All he’s done this year is post a 1.93 ERA with a 113/14 K/BB ratio over 93 1/3 innings. Yet he’s only 7-5 and the Nationals aren’t in first place, meaning that he really has not done his job, right?

Astros 13, Mariners 0: The Astros take two of three from Seattle. In the two wins they outscored the M’s 23-0. Not too bad. Here Lance McCullers had a no-hitter going through five but was nonethless pulled. That’s what happens when you’re a well-regarded kid and you’ve already tossed 90 pitches in those five innings. Four relievers came in after him and helped to combine for a two-hitter. Evan Gattis had four hits. Colby Rasmus and Hank Conger each drove in three. Houston: still in first place after Flag Day. Who’da thunk it?

Twins 4, Rangers 3: Byron Buxton made his big league debut. No hits and he struck out twice, but he scored the go-ahead and winning run from first base in the top of the ninth after reaching on a botched sac bunt in which the lead runner was thrown out.

Athletics 8, Angels 1: The A’s are double-digits behind the division leaders but Sonny Gray has done his job at least. He allowed only one unearned run in seven and two-thirds to lower his ERA to 1.60. Ben Zobrist — likely coming to a contender near you in the next month or so — went 3-for-5 and scored three times.

Diamondbacks 4, Giants 0: Good day for De La Rosas. Jorge set a team record and Rubby took a shutout into the ninth. He couldn’t seal the deal but he did get his first win in ages. Chris Heston, alas, did not pull a Johnny Vander Meer, allowing a hit in the second and being chased after five after giving up three runs.

Cubs 2, Reds 1: For the second game in a row Starlin Castro got a walkoff hit. This one in the 11th. Chicago took three of four. They’re seven games over .500. Six and a half back and in third place, mind you, but they’d be leading three other divisions and, given how strong the NL Central is, it’s totally possible three playoff teams come out of that division anyway.

Royals vs. Cardinals: POSTPONED: Another rainy day, we’re trapped inside with a train set
Chocolate on the boil, steamy windows when we met
You’ve got the attic window looking out on the cathedral
And on a Sunday evening bells ring out in the dusk

(sorry; I saw Belle and Sebastian in concert last night, so everything is nice and twee today)

Dodgers ridiculous rookie Joc Pederson homers for the fifth straight game

Joc Pederson

Wednesday night Dodgers center fielder Joc Pederson homered for the fifth consecutive game, adding to what has been an incredible start for the 23-year-old rookie.

Five straight games with a home run ties the Dodgers’ franchise record, which Pederson now shares with Adrian Gonzalez, Matt Kemp, Shawn Green, and Roy Campanella.

And not only does Pederson have 17 homers in 53 games, his home runs have traveled an average of 428 feet to lead all of baseball. He’s crushing pitches.

In addition to the spectacular power Pederson has also shown incredible patience at the plate, drawing 35 walks in 53 games. He’s hitting a modest .267, but all the power and patience combine to give him a lofty .393 on-base percentage and .606 slugging percentage.

Here’s a list of the highest OPS totals by a 23-year-old center fielder in MLB history:

Willie Mays       1954     1.078
Mickey Mantle     1955     1.042
Ken Griffey Jr.   1993     1.025
Al Simmons        1925     1.018
Ty Cobb           1910     1.008
JOC PEDERSON      2015      .999

Pederson has only played one-third of a season, but even with that caveat being on a list like that where the five guys ahead of him are all Hall of Famers (or soon to be Hall of Famers) is remarkable.

He’s currently out-hitting the other 23-year-old center fielder for a California team, reigning MVP Mike Trout, who has a measly* .932 OPS for the Angels this season.

* Note: .932 is a really, really good OPS.

And That Happened: Monday’s scores and highlights

Felix Hernandez

source: Getty Images

Yankees 7, Mariners 2: Felix Hernandez needed only six pitches to get through the first inning. He needed only nine pitches to get through the second. In the third he set the Yankees down in order once again, again on six pitches. Then this started happening:

That’s why they play the game. Hernandez’s line on the night: four and two-thirds innings pitched, six hits, seven runs, five walks and the loss. Mark Teixeira hit a grand slam off of him. The lessons: (1) watch the whole game; and (2) don’t read what people say on Twitter. Basically, ever. It’s an awful, awful website which will suck your entire life away.

Braves 8, Diamondbacks 1: Speaking of homers coming in bunches, get a load of Freddie Freeman, who has hit three in the past four games. He had three hits in all, as did Andrelton Simmons, who has a ten-game hitting streak. Chip Hale, after the game, explaining his team’s poor performance:

“We played tonight, unfortunately, like a team that played 17 innings yesterday and lost and traveled home, which is my fault, the coaches’ fault. We didn’t have them ready to play. I will take the blame on that. It is embarrassing to me. It is not the way a team that I would ever want to coach would play a game. It’s just sloppy, dead baseball and I apologize for that.”

He then disembowled himself with his family’s sword, handed it to bench coach Glen Sherlock who served as his kaishaku and completed the seppuku. Importantly, he did it all the right way.

Dodgers 11, Rockies 4: L.A. smacked four home runs. One by Howie Kendrick, who drove in four. It actually could’ve been a bigger beating here as the Dodgers had 18 hits and drew five walks. Heck, Adrian Gonzalez reached base five times last night and the only time he scored was on his solo homer. Clayton Kershaw even went 3-for-4 with run driven in. The only damage to Kershaw came on a Nolan Arenado two-run homer. He’s homered in three straight.

Angels 7, Rays 3: Both L.A. teams hit four home runs. Unless you’re one of those tiresome folks who insist that the Angels — formerly known as the California and Anaheim Angels and currently residing in Anaheim — aren’t really an L.A. team. But, as current events helpfully remind us, when someone changes their name, they should be accorded the same respect received by anyone who has changed their name. They want to be the Los Angeles Angeles? They’re the Los Angeles Angels. If you insist on calling them what you think their name really is or should be, you’re being a jerk.

Brewers 1, Cardinals 0: Carlos Gonzalez’s first inning RBI was all that happened on the offensive side of the game. Beyond that it may as well have been the high-mound, no-offense 1960s. Well, except for the part where it took eight pitchers to put up all of those goose eggs. I wouldn’t bet my children’s lives on this, but I would bet an awful lot on there never once being a nine inning, rain-free 1-0 game which required eight pitchers to finish between the years of, say, 1900 and 1990.

Astros 5, Orioles 2: Down one heading into the seventh, Houston scored four that frame, getting to a tiring Ubaldo Jimenez and an ineffective Brad Brach. This was the Orioles’ first game outside of the Eastern Time Zone all season which is kind of crazy. Bring back the balanced schedule.

Cubs 5, Marlins 1: Jason Hammel has pitched 67 innings this year. He has 69 strikeouts and only 7 walks. Nice. Here he struck out 11 and allowed only one run in six and two-thirds, walking no one, naturally. He had a little extra mojo here due to not having pitched in eight days, but it’s not like he’s needed it lately.

Mets 7, Padres 0: Jacob deGrom didn’t break a sweat, tossing eight shutout innings while allowing only two hits. The kid may be good. How good?

OK, you can read Twitter sometimes. There is some decent information on there. Andrew Cashner struck out 12, didn’t walk anybody and still didn’t make it through five innings. Which, well, OK! By the way, the Mets are in a virtual tie for first place with the Nats again.

Pirates 4, Giants 3: Neil Walker hit a tiebreaking two-run double in the fifth and Gerrit Cole struck out nine and allowed only two unearned runs. He’s 8-2 with a 1.90 ERA. I know wins are lame, but Cole is on a pace for 25 of them which really doesn’t happen much anymore.

Blue Jays vs. Nationals; Twins vs. Red Sox: POSTPONED: The breaker’s roar

On an unseen shore,
In the teeth of a hurricane,
Oh, we struggle in vain
A hellish night,
A ghostly light,
Appears through the driving rain,
Salvation in a human chain