Tag: Aaron Rowand

Aaron Rowand

The Marlins release Aaron Rowand


Aaron Rowand signed a minor league deal with the Marlins back in December, but it never got beyond that, as the Marlins released him today.  Don’t cry for Rowand, though: he’s still being paid on that five-year, $60 million deal the Giants gave him.

He might be done playing, though. He hit .233/.274/.347 with four homers in 331 at-bats before being released by San Francisco last season.  He still has an OK glove, but the man can’t hit anymore and in these days of 12 and 13-man pitching staffs, a defense-only outfielder is not a luxury a lot of teams can afford.

Taking the Belt to Bruce Bochy

Brandon Belt

CSN Bay Area’s Andrew Baggarly thinks the lineup the Giants used today is the one Bruce Bochy will go with on Opening Day as well. Which should please fans of the other NL West teams.

CF Angel Pagan
LF Melky Cabrera
3B Pablo Sandoval
C Buster Posey
1B Aubrey Huff
RF Nate Schierholtz
2B Ryan Theriot
SS Brandon Crawford

Missing, of course, is Brandon Belt, who has only managed to hit .368 with three homers and four doubles in 38 at-bats in Arizona. Huff has come in at .286 with two homers and no doubles in 28 at-bats. But there was never any real reason to think it’d be a fair fight. Huff is still making big money and will likely get a month or two of regular-season playing time to prove that he’s worth it.

The Giants do have the opportunity to go with both Belt and Huff by playing one of the two, most likely Huff, in the outfield. Such a move would probably do more harm than good, though. While the Giants need to get Belt’s bat in there, it makes a lot more sense to play him over Huff than either Pagan or Schierholtz. Neither of those guys are locks to hit, but they are among the league’s better defenders at their positions.

Giants fans just have to hope that if Huff is a liability in the early going, the team doesn’t wait as long as it did with Aaron Rowand and Miguel Tejada last year to drop him. If the plan is for Posey to see some time at first base, then Huff would quickly become an unnecessary part. The Giants could use Belt at first base against righties and young Hector Sanchez as their catcher against lefties, with Posey switching between the two positions.

Shane Victorino softens stance on demand for five-year deal

Philadelphia Phillies  v Los Angeles Dodgers

One day after saying he wanted a five-year contract extension from the Phillies free agent-to-be Shane Victorino backtracked a bit, telling Matt Gelb of the Philadelphia Inquirer: “I made it seem like I want a five-year deal, but I’d love to stay.”

Most of all, Victorino said, he’d like to get a new contract figured out “now rather than later” and “that’s what the basis of this whole thing is.”

Jimmy Rollins talked about wanting a five-year deal from the Phillies before eventually accepting a three-year, $38 million offer and based on Victorino’s comments it wouldn’t be shocking to see him do something similar. Of course, Victorino is two years younger than Rollins and has also gotten better with age, whereas the shortstop peaked in his late-20s like most players.

Victorino revealed that his agent has yet to engage in formal negotiations with the Phillies, but “is going to reach out to them” soon in the hopes of getting something done before Opening Day. He noted Torii Hunter and Aaron Rowand as comparable center fielders who signed five-year deals, with Hunter getting $90 million from the Angels and Rowand getting $60 million from the Giants.

Among all center fielders during the past three seasons Victorino ranked sixth in OPS (right behind Hunter) and fifth in Wins Above Replacement (right ahead of Hunter). Because the Phillies have so many other star players Victorino has probably been somewhat underrated, although that doesn’t necessarily mean signing him to a five-year deal that runs through his age-36 season would be a smart move.

Running down the rosters: Miami Marlins

Marlins Spring Baseball

The hopes are high with LeBron James having one of the greatest statistical seasons in NBA history and the Dolphins potentially landing Peyton Manning or Matt Flynn as their new quarterback. Also, the baseball team has a new name, a new stadium and a new star shortstop. Let’s see if that does the Marlins any good.

Josh Johnson – R
Mark Buehrle – L
Anibal Sanchez – R
Ricky Nolasco – R
Carlos Zambrano – R

Heath Bell – R
Edward Mujica – R
Michael Dunn – L
Ryan Webb – R
Randy Choate – L
Steve Cishek – R
Wade LeBlanc – L

Restricted list: Juan Oviedo (R)
SP next in line: Brad Hand (L), LeBlanc, Alex Sanabia (R), Sean West (L)
RP next in line: Jose Ceda (R), Chris Hatcher (R), Chad Gaudin (R), Sandy Rosario (R)

Along with their $106 million outlay for Jose Reyes, the Marlins spent $58 million on Buehrle and $27 million on Bell, adding stability to a staff that has lacked it for several years. Buehrle won’t contend for a Cy Young, but he’ll be at least a bit above average over the course of 200 innings. Bell’s best years are probably behind him, but he figures to be a quality closer for at least a couple of more years.

The Marlins have plenty of upside elsewhere. Johnson would be a legitimate Cy Young contender if he could stay healthy. Sanchez has posted an ERA in the mid-3.00s each of the last two years. If  those two combine to make 60 starts and either Nolasco or Zambrano can rebound (probably too much to expect both to do so), then the Marlins would be definite threats for the wild card.

SS Jose Reyes – S
CF Emilio Bonifacio – S
3B Hanley Ramirez – R
RF Mike Stanton – R
LF Logan Morrison – L
1B Gaby Sanchez – R
C John Buck – R
2B Omar Infante – R

C Brett Hayes – R
1B-3B Greg Dobbs – L
INF Donnie Murphy – R
OF Scott Cousins – L
OF Aaron Rowand – R

Next in line: C Clint Sammons (R), 3B Matt Dominguez (R), INF Nick Green (R), INF Gil Velazquez (R), OF Austin Kearns (R), OF Chris Coghlan (L), OF Bryan Petersen (L), OF Kevin Mattison (L)

Obviously, much depends on Hanley here. In him, Reyes and Stanton, the Marlins may well possess three of the NL’s top 10 position players. Day one went off without a hitch, but it still remains to be seen whether he’ll make an issue of the move to third base. A pouting Ramirez figures to be an unproductive Ramirez, but if Ozzie Guillen can get through to him — and who better to make the attempt — then the lineup could be dynamite.

What is disappointing is that the Marlins didn’t make much of an attempt to upgrade their bench over the winter. But Bonifacio’s versatility does help there. If Reyes or Infante gets hurt (and the Marlins don’t want to move Hanley back to short), Bonifacio can move back to the infield, opening up center for whichever outfielder is playing better. The Marlins do have plenty of competition for those outfield bench spots: one figures to go to a lefty (Cousins, Coghlan or Petersen) and the other to a righty (Rowand or Kearns).

In the Marlins’ case, I’m skeptical that the whole will be the equal to the sum of its parts. There’s some terrific talent here, and it wouldn’t be stunning to see the team win 95+ games and maybe even overtake the Phillies in the NL East. It also wouldn’t be much of a surprise to see Hanley force his way off the team and Johnson spend the bulk of the year on the DL, leading to a fourth-place finish. My guess is that they sneak into the postseason via the wild card, but I’m far from confident.

Pat Burrell and the Class of 1998

Pat Burrell, Charlie Manuel

Pat Burrell, the first overall pick in the 1998 draft, is expected to announce his retirement in the coming days. J.D. Drew, another top player from the same class, may do the same. So, here’s a look at the top players from the 1998 draft, as judged by Baseball-Reference’s version of WAR (the list only includes 1998 picks who signed):

49.8: CC Sabathia – Cle – 20th overall
46.3: Mark Buehrle – CWS – 1139th
45.9: J.D. Drew – StL – 5th
30.9: Matt Holliday – Col – 210th
24.0: Adam Dunn – Cin – 50th
20.2: Aaron Rowand – CWS – 35th
18.7: Pat Burrell – Phi – 1st
17.9: Brandon Inge – Det – 57th
16.3: Mark Mulder – Oak – 2nd
15.8: Austin Kearns – Cin – 7th
15.5: Jack Wilson – StL – 258th
15.2: Carlos Pena – Tex – 10th
14.2: Aubrey Huff – TB – 162nd
13.6: Juan Pierre – Col – 390th
13.3: Jeff Weaver – Det – 14th
13.3: Eric Byrnes – Oak – 225th
12.2: Morgan Ensberg – Hou – 272nd
12.2: B.J. Ryan – Cin – 500th
10.3: Eric Hinske – ChC – 496th
10.3: Brad Wilkerson – Mon – 33rd
9.4: Matt Thornton – Sea – 22nd
9.0: Ryan Madson – Phi – 254th
8.3: Brad Lidge – Hou – 17th
8.0: Nick Punto – Phi – 614th
7.9: Adam Everett – Bos – 12th
7.8: David Ross – LAD – 216th
7.4: Gerald Laird – Oak – 45th
7.4: Jason Michaels – Phi – 104th
7.1: Felipe Lopez – Tor – 8th
7.0: John Buck – Hou – 212th
6.5: Bill Hall – Mil – 176th
6.4: Brian Lawrence – SD – 502nd
6.2: Corey Patterson – ChC – 3rd
6.2: Kip Wells – CWS – 16th
6.1: Joe  Kennedy – TB – 252nd

Burrell comes in seventh, which seems about right given his lack of defensive value. Of the players below him, only Inge and Pena would seem to have much chance of passing him on the list, and it’s entirely possible Inge will produce negative WAR over the remainder of his career.

The Phillies, incidentally, also landed Madson, Punto and Michaels. They and the Reds were the only teams to land draft four semi-useful players in 1998, as I judge it anyway. The Reds selected Todd Coffey along with Dunn, Kearns and Ryan.

Here’s that list:

4 – Phillies, Reds
3 – Astros, Athletics, Cubs, Rockies, Tigers, White Sox
2 – Blue Jays, Braves, Cardinals, Rays, Red Sox
1 – Brewers, D’Backs, Dodgers, Expos, Giants, Indians, Mariners, Mets, Orioles, Padres, Pirates, Rangers
0 – Angels, Marlins, Orioles, Royals, Twins, Yankees

The Orioles drafted Cliff Lee and the Yankees picked Mark Prior, but neither player signed. I’d say the Royals had the worst draft of all: they had the 4th (Jeff Austin), 30th (Chris George) and 31st (Matt Burch) overall picks and got nothing from them.