Curt Schilling

Curt Schilling talks PEDs, CHBs and SPFs


Curt Schilling tackled a couple of hot topics on WEEI radio Friday: the David Ortiz-Dan Shaughnessy PED controversy and the Clay Buchholz ball-sliming scandal.

On the David Ortiz matter, Schilling backs his former teammate and knocks Shaughnessy for once again trying to insert himself into the news. “Because it’s as important for him to be a part of the story as it is to write the story,” Schilling said. “And players have a problem with that.”

He also talks about steroids in general and again states how he never knew how big of a problem it was a problem in his prime years. He believes the testing program now is much better than ever before, and he can’t resist taking a dig at another former teammate:

I do believe that including bloodwork was a game-changer. Here’s what I would say now: Now if you get caught, you’re either Manny Ramirez dumb or you’re going to such extremes to try and cheat and beat a blood test that you deserve whatever they throw at you. It’s obviously not going to stop everybody. But when the players’ association, rightfully so, agreed to include blood testing, that was a game-changer for me. It was something that I never ever thought the Players Association would approve or be OK with. But God bless them, they did.

On the subject of Buchholz and foreign substances, Schilling admitted that he used BullFrog sunscreen, too:

Here’s the thing: I did it. And I did it for the same reasons Clay did it. I would tell you there is no ballpark harder to grip a baseball in than the SkyDome [Rogers Centre]. It is the hardest and the driest environment — for me it was — in the big leagues. I had no saliva, I had cotton mouth in that stadium all the time. You needed something, and it was to keep a grip. You can’t cheat by getting an extra grip on the ball. That’s not how you cheat. You cheat by getting the ball moist and wet. If that was what Clay was trying to do, he would have been doing the opposite of what he actually did. You want the ball to be slick. You want it to be almost like — not spit, but water. He was actually using that stuff to keep a grip.

Jerry Spar has a lengthier transcript with more Schilling quotes over at, along with a link to the interview audio.

Curt Schilling wanted his video game to have “mounted combat on flying pigs.” Yet it somehow failed.

Schilling 2

Jonathan Mahler of Bloomberg View has a story about Curt Schilling’s business failures at 38 Studios. The difference here: he found a business school case study from 2009 in which Schilling — pre-failure — was interviewed about his plans and ambitions. And once you read it, you won’t be all that surprised that it failed.

Among the highlights:

  • “I wanted to make a difference in the world and take one shot at getting Bill-Gates-rich,” he told the study’s authors;
  • “Schilling had no idea how much time and money it took to build the software required for such a game. And he didn’t exactly help matters by weighing in with suggestions of his own. There was, for example, that instance when he mentioned in an e- mail that it might be cool to have mounted combat on flying pigs. The design team worked on nothing else for a week.”
  • He once asked the president of 38 Studios if employees got weekends off. Another time he suggested that they work 14 days straight so as not to lose their momentum.

The article paints a picture of an in-way-over-his-head megalomaniac. The only reason the company didn’t fail sooner, I assume, is because that mounted combat on flying pigs thing was a FANTASTIC IDEA. Just imagine how big a disaster this would have been if it weren’t for that.

Curt Schilling and Alex Cora pick Ryan Howard for NL MVP

Ryan Howard

I’m not lying.

Thankfully, the rest made reasonable picks in Joey Votto (17 votes), Buster Posey and Bryce Harper (six), Ryan Braun and Justin Upton (three), Andrew McCutchen (two), and Matt Kemp, Jason Heyward and Giancarlo Stanton (one).

Ryan Howard is 33 years old and is still visibly limping from an Achilles injury that caused him to miss half of last season. He’s been average or better by Wins Above Replacement (2 or more WAR) in one of the last four seasons, according to Baseball Reference. He plays average defense if you’re being generous with your evaluation, and he’s one of baseball’s worst base runners. He would have to put up numbers reminiscent of his 2006 for him to even come close to sniffing votes for NL MVP.

Perhaps Schilling and Cora have been swayed by his .336 average, seven home runs, and 16 RBI in spring training, but if you bank that much on spring training stats, you would have had some serious egg on your face in 2011 with Jake Fox.

Though stranger things have happened.

Curt Schilling’s bloody sock goes for $92,613 at auction

blood sock ap

From the Associated Press, via

NEW YORK (AP) – A bloody sock worn by Curt Schilling while pitching for the Boston Red Sox in Game 2 of the 2004 World Series against the St. Louis Cardinals was sold for $92,613 at a live auction on Saturday night at the Fletcher-Sinclair Mansion.

Schilling had loaned his sock to the National Baseball Hall of Fame Museum but when his Rhode Island-based video game company “38 Studios” went bankrupt, he decided to sell the sock that was bloodied as he pitched on an injured ankle.

Bidding began at $25,000 on Monday.

ESPN sports business reporter Darren Rovell calls the final $92,613 bid a “disappointment” and suspects that the “decline of Schilling’s business and his name associated with it had a lot to do with the low price.”

This sock is not the famous one he wore during Game 6 of the 2004 ALCS against the Yankees. Rather, it’s the one he wore in Game 2 of the World Series against the Cardinals. So that may have factored into the lack of mystique. Schilling says he threw that Game 6 bloody sock into the trash at Yankee Stadium.

He probably never envisioned having such massive money problems.

Report: Curt Schilling’s claim that someone suggested he use PEDs was “completely baseless”


More fallout from the Curt Schilling controversy from last week.  Gordon Edes of ESPN Boston has two sources with direct knowledge of the 2008 investigation into Schilling’s claims that a Red Sox employee suggested he take PEDs telling him that the claim by Schilling was “completely baseless.”

Theo Epstein and a spokesman for Major League Baseball said last week there was an investigation and that it did not result in discipline (more comment from Theo here).  This report, however, seems to take it a bit further, suggesting not only was no wrongdoing found but suggesting that Schilling made it all up.  For his part, Schilling stands by the story.

This has become such a weird story. I still wonder why initial responses from MLB and from Jed Hoyer suggested no knowledge of the incident. But that could be just a quirk of memory or a matter of people not fully authorized to say things vamping for time until official statements could be made.  This stuff — the suggestion that Schilling was crying wolf — was even weirder.

Maybe a function of Schilling’s then well known dispute with the Red Sox about how to treat his injured shoulder? He wants surgery, they suggest treatment and medication and he, being the dramatic sort, takes that to be a suggestion to take PEDs?

No idea, but with Schilling I suppose anything is possible.