Curt Schilling

Curt Schilling talks about what kind of color commentator he’ll be


Bob Raissman of the Daily News spoke with Curt Schilling, ESPN’s new Sunday Night Baseball color commentator. They talked about style and stuff, and Schilling, quite characteristically, does not lack confidence:

“I can watch a pitcher for an inning and have a deep and wide understanding of who and what they are and what they do . . . If I were to talk to you about a pitch sequence to a hitter in the seventh inning, literally every pitch has 50 to 60 thoughts, ideas and processes around it and behind it,” Schilling said. “Just getting some of that out there is going to be different, new and unique.”

I don’t know how unique that is. Tim McCarver, Schilling’s predecessor Orel Hershiser and many others talk about what the pitcher is thinking. Maybe Schilling can do it better because he’s a better pitcher than most analysts ever were and is certainly a smart guy. But hearing Schilling talk about being “different, new and unique” gives me pause. I’d love him to just give us an enjoyable broadcast, not try to make his mark. But I suppose we’ll see how it plays out.

The other big issue that comes up: criticism of players. Schilling says he’s going to criticize in a way that is not negative. I’m not sure what that means. In the context of broadcasting — and in the opinion of players — there appears to be very little distinction made between criticizing performance and being personally negative or attacking someone. Merely saying a guy didn’t have a good game plan at the plate is taken as out-of-bounds criticism at times and, as a result, there is a big tendency among ex-athletes to say almost nothing negative. It’s really a drag, because sometimes you have to say something negative.

If Schilling is able to make that distinction — to hate the player’s game, not the player — that truly would be revolutionary. I hope he does it. Because viewers will be just as much if not more enlightened to understand what led to a player’s failure in any given moment than merely to what led to his success.

Curt Schilling to join ESPN’s Sunday Night Baseball booth

Curt Schilling

Yesterday we learned that Orel Hershisher is leaving ESPN to take a job broadcasting Dodgers games. Because, for some reason, ESPN thinks that a three-man booth is good for baseball (it isn’t) they felt obligated to fill Hershiser’s spot. And because, for some reason, ESPN thinks Curt Schilling is someone people want to listen to (he isn’t) they have given him the gig. Schilling will become a Sunday Night Baseball analyst alongside play-by-play commentator Dan Shulman and his former Phillies teammate John Kruk.

Schilling is not dumb and, in the studio, he is capable of making good points from time-to-time. He also, however, (a) tends to fall back on cliche at a pretty high rate; and (b) has a habit of trying to say too much in too short a time and his voice gets high and strained and, frankly, it’s kind of exhausting to listen to him for a long time. One wonders how he’ll sound over the course of a three-hour broadcast.

The bigger issue here is the insistence by ESPN on having a three-man booth. It leads to exceedingly long stretches of conversation among the broadcasters, with everyone trying to say things to justify their existence in the booth which, in turn, causes them to ignore game action for several minutes at a time. I mean, say what you want about Joe Morgan, but at least when it was him and Jon Miller in the booth they talked about the game going on in front of them. Now? Sunday Night Baseball is often unwatchable or, at the very least, unlistenable. Adding Schilling does nothing to remedy that.

Curt Schilling’s estate sale went pretty smoothly, randomly

Schilling bloody sock

The morning after the latest chapter of Boston Red Sox post-season heroics, a reminder of how fleeting such glory can be.  Curt Schilling, hero of 2004, has people going over all of his stuff.

We noted his estate sale last week. Here’s a scene from it that kind of brings home that these guys are just people:

Bill Fegley bought two bathroom scales, $8 each, with this logic: Maybe Schilling had weighed in on them while wearing the famous bloody sock from the 2004 World Series when he pitched on an injured ankle.

“I saw the scales and thought, ‘What a riot to give to my dad,’ ” said Fegley, who also bought a blue fabric shower curtain ($5) and a cow figurine ($5).

A million miles from Fenway.

Wanna buy Curt Schilling’s stuff?

Curt Schilling

Curt Schilling went broke designing video games in which players were to have engaged in mounted combat while riding flying pigs. How that wasn’t a billion dollar idea I have no idea, but stuff happens.

And when you go broke, stuff gets auctioned off. Curt Schilling’s stuff, to be specific, and you can go here to see what piece of SchillingDom you want. Among the many items listed for sale:

Craftsman tractor entitled “The Ice Mower”, Hummer golf cart, baseball glove chair, marble top pedestal sink, billiard table, pinball & arcade games, ping pong table, tools, various sporting equipment, pristine retro Coca Cola machine, matching sofas & club chairs from the home theater, Studio 38 drafting table, lots of costumes just in time for Halloween … and so much more to be unpacked! Due to the large quantity of items, the sale hours have been extended from our usual to 8-4:00pm! This is one you DO NOT want to miss!!

No love for Schilling at all, and much scorn for him given how badly his company ended up screwing its employees over. Employees who, unlike him, can’t fall back on a high-priced ESPN analyst gig or a Major League Baseball pension.  That said, it’s kinda sad to see a person’s belongings put up for auction like this. Especially kids’ stuff, of which there is a lot.