So Curt Schilling spent his evening arguing against the theory of evolution


We’ve read all of the stories about Curt Schillng’s recovery from cancer and other attendant maladies. And they have been uplifting and encouraging. But maybe the most uplifting and encouraging evidence of Schilling’s recovery came last night when we learned that, finally, he is back to his old self, 100%.

How do we know this? Because he spent the night being bullheaded and annoying on the Internet.

You see, Schilling spent a great deal of time on Twitter last night arguing against the Theory of Evolution. Deadspin summarizes it here, but you can go to Twitter and see it in real time too. It’s quite a thing.

The main thrust of his argument were the old chestnuts about their being gaps in the fossil record and no real time evidence of evolution that we, as lay persons, have witnessed. No fossil of, say, a fish with legs like that “Darwin” sticker people put on the back of their Subarus. And no ape born in, like, the 1970s, which spontaneously turned into a human in 1986 or whatever. I didn’t see the entirety of his interactions with his followers, but I do hope at least one of them sent him a link explaining why that is pure, uncut and unadulterated hooey.

It used to always irk me when someone carried on like this. And yes, part of me is still a tad troubled by the fact that a guy who is paid to be an analyst has demonstrated a tendency to espouse his gut-held beliefs rather than actually deal with the evidence available that better-explains a phenomenon. I presume next year Schilling will be in the booth for Sunday Night Baseball and I wouldn’t bet even a nickel on him not arguing in favor of some unprovable folk wisdom about hitting or pitching rather than actually breaking down what happened objectively.

But for the most part I just smile at this sort of thing. The beauty of science, it has been said, is that it does not require that one believe in it to be true. Not even Curt Schilling, who is free to believe what he wants to believe, even if it’s wrong on just about every possible level. And even if that which he disbelieves played a crucial role in his ability to be here today disbelieving it.

Because if he’s doing that, man, we KNOW the old Curt Schilling is back. And however annoying that may be in the moment, I sleep better at night knowing that he is out there, somewhere, driving people absolutely nuts.

Must-click link: Curt Schilling says “I brought all of this on myself”

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Curt Schilling could’ve died from cancer and all of the attendant complications. He lost $50 million of his own money, cost the State of Rhode Island even more and messed up the lives of all of the employees of his video game company. And he doesn’t want an ounce of sympathy from anyone:

“I brought this on myself,” Schilling said in a lengthy interview in Kansas City earlier this week. “For the last two years I’ve had to stand in front of my wife and kids and explain to them, ‘I lost $50 million and my company went bankrupt, and it was all my fault.’

“Then I had to stand in front of them and tell them, ‘I have cancer because I dipped.’

Those comments come in the course of this article from Jackie MacMullan of ESPN Boston, which explains just how bad Schilling’s cancer diagnosis and treatment was. Many aspects of it, including the cancer itself, infections, and depression which required hospitalization, could’ve killed him. It’s amazingly harrowing stuff, involving excruciating pain, feeding tubes and hallucinations. To this day, even though he’s on the mend, he can’t eat in public because he can’t swallow properly. He mostly consumes Ensure and Boost because he can ingest it quickly.

Maybe the craziest part is what Schilling says about smokeless tobacco, which is what caused his cancer:

He does not plan to canvass the country serving as a cautionary tale of the dangers of smokeless tobacco. That, he feels, would be hypocritical.

“I still want the stuff,” Schilling said. “Right now. But the beautiful thing for me is my salivary glands have been destroyed by the radiation, so I can’t. I’ve wanted to dip a couple of times, but I literally can’t.”

Take some time out and read this story today.


Curt Schilling will return to TV on Thursday

Curt Schilling

Curt Schilling, who was sidelined all season during his battle with cancer but who now is in remission, will soon be returning to TV:

No word on if or when he’ll be on Sunday Night Baseball, as he was originally scheduled to be all season. My guess is that they’ll just wait until next spring given how little time in the season is left. And given that it’s possible that Schilling isn’t yet up to the amount of travel that entails.

But it’s good to see him on the mend and back at it.

Curt Schilling reveals that he was diagnosed with mouth cancer, blames smokeless tobacco


When Curt Schilling was diagnosed with cancer back in February he did not reveal the form of cancer. He and his family have kept almost everything about it to themselves, actually, as one might quite reasonably wish to do.

However, Schilling is talking about it now. He announced today during the WEEI/NESN Jimmy Fund Radio Telethon that he was diagnosed with mouth cancer. Thankfully, he is currently in remission.

But this story is not going to end here. Not after this:

We have already lost one Hall of Famer this year to cancer that, he believed anyway, was attributable to smokeless tobacco. That a should-be and likely will-be Hall of Famer is now coming forward and saying that he believes smokeless tobacco threatened his life should only increase the volume on this long overdue wakeup call to baseball players who continue to use the junk.

Here’s hoping Schilling continues back on the mend and here’s hoping that his coming forward helps prevent future cases like his.

Curt Schilling’s cancer is in remission

Curt Schilling

Good news for Curt Schilling and his family: he tweeted this yesterday:

The former Astros/Orioles/Phillies/Diamondbacks/Red Sox pitcher revealed in February that he has cancer, though he’s never said which kind he has. Whatever kind it is, any kind that is in remission is better than a kind that is not.

Schilling won 216 games, was a three-time Cy Young runner up and won three world championships before retiring at the age of 40 in 2007. He’s recently done studio work for ESPN on Baseball Tonight, and he had been slated to join the network’s broadcast booth for Sunday Night Baseball this season before his illness struck. Here’s hoping he’s well enough to be back to work soon.