Former MLB player Curt Schilling talks with a reporter at the Electronic Entertainment Expo, or E3, in Los Angeles, California June 9, 2011. REUTERS/David McNew

Curt Schilling makes a disgusting anti-transgender post on Facebook

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This has got to be the final straw, right? Curt Schilling, ESPN’s baseball analyst who has been in trouble multiple times for his social media posts and comments, has once again stepped in it. Indeed, this may be his worst one yet.

It was a meme he shared on Facebook and under which he commented dealing with the issue of access to public facilities for transgender people and it contains a disgusting caricature of what, apparently, Schilling believes to be a transgender person. I won’t reproduce the meme he shared here, but you can see it if you’d like at OutSports, which brought this to the public’s attention. They also pass along his comments, which I presume he’ll soon delete. Schilling:

“A man is a man no matter what they call themselves. I don’t care what they are, who they sleep with, men’s room was designed for the penis , women’s not so much. Now you need laws telling us differently? Pathetic”

While many may feel that way, such sentiments are wholly ignorant of transgender people and their nature (note: they are people who just have to go to the bathroom sometimes like everyone else) and perpetuates stereotypes of a much-maligned class of people. There is an entire b.s. perpetuation machine backing these sorts of sentiments, by the way, smearing transgender people as deviants or threats when, in fact, there are no documented cases of people exploiting transgender non-discrimination laws to commit crimes. Of course, given Schilling’s track record, it is not necessarily surprising that he’s willing to buy into false claims and hyperbole which support his general disposition.

But even if you step away from the substance, it’s undeniable that public access for transgender people is a highly controversial issue at the moment, with North Carolina passing a restrictive law in this regard which has led to boycotts of the state by performing artists and travel restrictions for public officials who would visit North Carolina in their official capacity. Likewise, the NBA is currently considering taking next year’s All-Star Game out of Charlotte. No matter which side of this matter a person may fall, it’s highly doubtful that ESPN wants one of its top commenters wading into it at the moment, at least in as crass a manner as Schilling did.

Of course, Schilling has skated in the past and still makes seven figures talking about baseball for ESPN. One wonders if this will finally cause them to fire him or if he’ll continue to be teflon.

Curt Schilling critical of Chris Archer’s hair, for some reason

Former MLB player Curt Schilling talks with a reporter at the Electronic Entertainment Expo, or E3, in Los Angeles, California June 9, 2011. REUTERS/David McNew
REUTERS/David McNew
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Previewing Sunday’s Opening Day game between the Blue Jays and Rays for ESPN, Curt Schilling decided to use his on-air time to criticize Chris Archer‘s hair. In a split-screen showing pictures of starters Archer and Marcus Stroman, Schilling circled Archer’s hair with the Telestrator and said, “Chris Archer, everything but this right here: big league.”

Cork Gaines of Business Insider put video of it on Twitter:

Many other broadcasters would likely be given slack for the remark, but given comments made in the past, Schilling doesn’t have the privilege of benefit of the doubt anymore.

Recent highlights of Schilling’s include:

  • Saying presidential candidate Hillary Clinton “should be buried under a jail somewhere”
  • Tweeting that ISIS was winning the Democratic debate going on at the time
  • Tweeting a picture that equated Muslims with Nazis

Additionally, in the context of recent disagreements between older players and younger players concerning displays of emotion, Schilling’s comments come off as more tired culture policing.

Report: Curt Schilling will return to ESPN following controversial remarks about Hillary Clinton

BOSTON, MA - AUGUST 03: Former Boston Red Sox pitcher Curt Schilling #38 throws out the first pitch after being inducted into the Red Sox Hall of Fame prior to the game against the Minnesota Twins during the game on August 3, 2012 at Fenway Park in Boston, Massachusetts. (Photo by Jared Wickerham/Getty Images)
Jared Wickerham/Getty Images
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Earlier this month, former major leaguer and current ESPN analyst Curt Schilling went on 610 AM in Kansas City and made a controversial comment about Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton. Schilling said, “If I’m gonna believe, and I don’t have any reason not to believe, that she gave classified information on hundreds if not thousands of emails on a public server after what happened to General Petraeus, she should buried under a jail somewhere.”

The comment earned Schilling and ESPN plenty of backlash and the sports media company said, “We are addressing it.” A few months prior, ESPN updated its policy for addressing the 2016 presidential election, saying, “We should refrain from political editorializing, personal attacks or ‘drive-by’ comments regarding the candidates and their campaigns.”

Schilling seemed at peace with the possibility he might lose his job, but Vocativ is reporting that ESPN confirmed Schilling will remain on the Monday Night Baseball team.

This is not the first time Schilling has landed in hot water. Last September, ESPN removed him from coverage of the Little League World Series and Sunday Night Baseball after making a Tweet that compared Muslims to Nazis. But to be fair to Schilling, it hasn’t been all bad. Last March, he valiantly stood up for his daughter, who was receiving some vicious comments online.

At least Curt Schilling has a sense of humor about his job status

Curt Schilling
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I’ve given Curt Schilling a lot of crap in the past, but I have to tip my cap to him here.

Many people are passing this around, but I saw it via Meg Rowley of Lookout Landing and Baseball Prospectus. It’s from the public listing of federal campaign contributors. Schilling, not surprisingly, has made donations to political campaigns in the past.

In 2008, while still an active player, he donated to the McCain campaign and listed “Boston Red Sox” as his employer. This past January he donated a small amount to Ben Carson’s campaign and listed “ESPN” as his employer. That makes sense.

Last September, however, right on the heels of his suspension in the wake of his controversial social media habits, he was a bit more specific. Check out the middle one:

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I’m still not Curt Schilling’s greatest off-the-field fan, but I always retain some goodwill for people who have a sense of humor about stuff. Kudos to Schilling for being zen about his job status.

Curt Schilling assumes ESPN will fire him if they take any action over his Hillary Clinton comment

Curt Schilling
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Yesterday we heard Curt Schilling say that Hillary Clinton “should be buried under a jail somewhere,” and then we learned that ESPN was “addressing” the matter. What that means is unclear. In the past ESPN has looked the other way at some of Schilling’s controversial comments while punishing him for others.

Schilling himself, however, suspects that if ESPN does take any action over this that it will be his firing.

This is from his Facebook interaction with someone late last night, commenting on the story that ESPN was addressing the matter. I’ve not screen-capped the people with whom he was speaking because they’re not public people and their comments aren’t necessary to understand Schilling’s comments, but as of this moment you can see the entire conversation on Schilling’s public Facebook page:

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The person to whom he was speaking then suggests that ESPN may suspend him for a period of perhaps 90 days. Schilling counters:

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Schilling knows the dynamic between he and his employer better than anyone, it should be assumed. Maybe he’s being dramatic. Maybe he knows he’s on a short leash. I suppose we’ll soon know.

Either way, Schilling has said far worse things than offering his opinion that a leading presidential candidate should be dead and buried. One would assume, however, that at some point the issue with ESPN is not the specific thing that Schilling says but the cumulative nature of his controversial statements. No straw weighs particularly much, after all, but at some point one additional one breaks the camel’s back.