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Curt Schilling thinks Adam Jones is still lying about racist incident in Boston

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Yesterday, Jeff Passan of Yahoo Sports published a Q&A with Orioles outfielder Adam Jones about race issues in baseball and in America at large. Jones was the victim of a racist incident during a game against the Red Sox at Fenway Park earlier this month. One fan threw peanuts at him while another yelled racist epithets at him.

The Red Sox publicly apologized to Jones and made clear strides to remedy the situation, while Major League Baseball issued a statement expressing zero tolerance for that kind of behavior from fans. Former major leaguer Curt Schilling, now a conservative talk radio hero, came out and accused Jones of making the whole thing up.

Schilling isn’t backing down. After Jones mentioned Schilling in his Q&A with Passan, Schilling responded to WEEI.com in a text message, continuing to accuse Jones of pushing an agenda.

If he wants to maintain the lie he made here, that’s fine. No one denies racism exists, but when people like him lie about an incident and others just take him at his word, it perpetuates a mythical level of racism. And for some reason, it appears blacks believe only blacks can talk about racism and only whites can be racists. I promise you if some scumbag yelled the N-word at Adam Jones in Fenway, it would have been on Twitter, Facebook and every other social media site asap, like every other ‘incident.’ Not to mention the liberal Boston media would have broken its neck to identify the racist. But just taking him at his word means there are a bunch of white cowards and racists living here, because no one stood up to the guy. Adam has an agenda and one needs to only look at his past commentary on race and racism to see it. But see, when you question fake hate crimes in this day and age it somehow makes you a racist. If you use this use every word or none at all.

Of course, the Red Sox did ban a fan who used a racist slur at Fenway Park, just not the one who yelled it at Jones. And Jones’ story was backed up by numerous other players who said they experienced similar treatment in Boston, including CC Sabathia, David Price, Jackie Bradley, Jr., Barry Bonds, and Mark McLemore.

As I mentioned yesterday, people in positions of systemic power (e.g. white men) need to learn to listen and empathize when people without that systemic power speak up. Orioles manager Buck Showalter is a great example. Following the incident at Fenway, Showalter said, “I can’t sit here and profess how Adam feels. Like I’ve said before, I’ve never been black, so I’m not going to sit here and try to act like I know. But I can tell you how it makes me feel.” Schilling, on the other hand, has never been a black man and has never even played the outfield at Fenway, yet he’s comfortable erasing Jones’ experience and making a conclusion that goes against the testimonies of numerous other players who backed Jones up.

Curt Schilling thinks Adam Jones is lying

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In the wake of events which unfolded at Fenway Park this week, there have been a lot of people — some in the media, most just random folks on social media — who refuse to take Adam Jones at his word that someone shouted a racial epithet at him. They demand “evidence” that this occurred, without appreciating that one man’s account of what he witnessed is, in fact, evidence in every court of law.

So, in the absence of any reason Jones would have to lie — and none have been articulated by anyone — why would his word be discounted? Bill tackled that some the other night, but it mostly boils down to denial that racism is still a thing and denial of society’s complicity in it persisting. It’s about refusing to believe someone when they said something bad happened because (a) that bad thing never happens to them; and (b) they do not want to examine whether they have any responsibility for it or to stop it.

So far I’m unaware of any ballplayers who have come out with such sentiments. Probably because they’ve heard it all before at ballparks or, if they somehow haven’t, they trust their fellow ballplayers and take them at their word.

But then there’s Curt Schilling. He thinks Adam Jones is lying:

“I don’t believe the story, given the world we live in. I don’t believe it, for this reason: Everybody is starving and hungry to sit in front of a camera and talk and be social justice warriors. And if a fan yelled loud enough in center field for Adam Jones to hear the N-word, I guarantee you we would’ve heard and seen fans around on CNN on MSNBC, they would’ve found multiple fans to talk about what a racist piece of junk Boston is . . .

. . . I spent most of my adult life in baseball parks. I heard the N-word out of my black teammates’ mouths about 100 million times. For somebody to talk loud enough for Adam Jones to hear the N-word in center field, other people would have heard it. If somebody did say it, we’re going to see it and hear about it, and I would apologize to Adam Jones for doubting him, but until then, I think this is bulls–t. I think this is somebody creating a situation.”

Sorry Adam Jones. According to Curt Schilling, your story is b.s. — you’re “creating a situation” for political purposes. And he will not believe you unless or until the matter reaches his unspecified and likely unattainable burden of proof. Your experience of what happened just this past Monday is irrelevant compared to Schilling’s time spent in baseball parks.

In other news, I do not believe Schilling’s sock was really bloody back in 2004. I think someone was trying to create a situation. Where’s the proof?

Theo Epstein says Curt Schilling referenced “Negotiating for Dummies” during contract talks

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Current Cubs president of baseball operations and former Red Sox GM Theo Epstein was on the Pardon My Take podcast recently. During the interview, he recalled a story involving Curt Schilling last decade, when the two sides were discussing a contract extension. According to Epstein, they were at Schilling’s home printing out some paperwork. Epstein glanced over and saw a dog-eared book called “Negotiating for Dummies.”

SI’s Extra Mustard provides the transcript:

Epstein: So we were negotiating back and forth. He had fired his agent and he was representing himself. We were negotiating a contract extension back and forth.

PMT: That’s a mismatch. (Laughs)

Epstein: Yeah, that’s what I thought. I thought we were doing pretty well in the negotiations. So we reach a deal. We’re happy with it and we go back to print it out in his little home office. We were using his computer and his printer to print it out and there on his desk is a well-worn dog-eared copy of the book Negotiating for Dummies…Every time he was pretending to go to the bathroom, he was running back and looking at that book.

Given everything we know about Schilling, the story isn’t shocking. But it is hilarious.