Curt Schilling

Curt Schilling made $2.5 million a year to do . . . whatever it was he did

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Thing I learned while, for some reason, listening to Curt Schilling call in to the Dan Patrick Show today: he was paid $2.5 million a year to work for ESPN. $2.5 million.

I will refrain from saying whether or not I’d personally pay Curt Schilling $2.5 million to opine about baseball on my sports network, but I will say this: if someone paid me $2.5 million a year and said “Craig, you can keep this job as long as you don’t post offensive memes on your Facebook page more than, like, 5-6 times,” I think I’d still have that job. I realize Schilling doesn’t roll that way and, hey, you do you, Curt, but it’s not like it’d be hard for him to still be making $2.5 million a year right now if he really wanted to.

Again: Curt Schilling. $2.5 million. Yup.

Eyebrows raised as ESPN cuts Schilling’s segment from a 2004 Red Sox documentary

Curt Schilling
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Several years ago ESPN produced a documentary about the 2004 Boston Red Sox’ amazing comeback in the ALCS called “Four Days in October.” They’ve re-run it a lot. Yesterday, in the run up to last night’s Yankees-Red Sox game, they ran it again, on ESPN2. Only it was a bit shorter than usual. Why? Because it omitted the part about Curt Schilling and his bloody sock in Game 6.

Which, um, that’s one of the signature moments of that series, right? It’s one of the signature moments of the entire modern era of the franchise. Why edit that out? Many Red Sox fans — who also didn’t much care for ESPN’s handling of the DeflateGate story — believe that it was a vindictive act. A figurative airbrushing out of Schilling and his moment given his recent termination by the World Wide Leader. Even Schilling himself snarked about it:

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For its part, ESPN had a simple explanation: the softball game which led in to the documentary ran long and they needed to cut someplace. Which makes some sense. It’s probably also worth noting that decisions about programming on their secondary network on a sleepy Sunday afternoon are not likely made in a board room by mustache-twirling villains. If ESPN really has it in for Schilling at this point, that’s a rather random and passive aggressive way to show it. My gut instinct is that this is just a coincidence.

But when it’s ESPN and Schilling it’s understandable when people assume there’s something more to it than coincidence. Both sides have, in the past, behaved in curious enough ways with respect to innocuous things that the benefit of the doubt is not something which is likely to be given automatically by some. Especially in Boston.

ESPN hires Raul Ibanez to replace Curt Schilling

Seattle Mariners' Raul Ibanez takes a swing during a baseball game against the Oakland Athletics, Friday, Sept. 27, 2013, in Seattle. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)
AP Photo/Ted S. Warren
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ESPN announced on Wednesday it has hired former major leaguer Raul Ibanez to replace Curt Schilling. The two asides agreed to a multi-year deal. Ibanez is expected to provide commentary on Baseball Tonight as well as select broadcast games.

Schilling was fired by ESPN last week, the culmination of a handful of social media snafus, the latest of which involved sharing an anti-transgender meme on Facebook. His other transgressions included suggesting that Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton “should be buried under a jail somewhere,” comparing Muslims to Nazis, and arguing with Keith Law over evolution. Law, not Schilling, was punished in that particular case.

Ibanez, who turns 44 in June, is a veteran of 19 seasons and last played in 2014 with the Royals. He was mentioned various times in the last two years as a potential candidate to coach or manage and ended up being hired as a special assistant to Dodgers president of baseball operations Andrew Friedman in February.

Ibanez will debut on ESPN at 8 PM EST tonight during the Rangers/Yankees game.

Dallas Braden named Curt Schilling’s replacement for Monday night games

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Richard Sandomir of the New York Times reports that Dallas Braden has been named Curt Schilling’s replacement on ESPN’s Monday Night Baseball broadcasts.

Braden, famous for tossing a perfect game in 2010, retied from baseball in early 2014, calling his arm a “shredded mess.” He only pitched 18 more innings after the 2010 season, saying “I left my arm on the mound at the Coliseum.” Since then he has had various media jobs, most recently as a studio talking head on ESPN’s “Baseball Tonight.”

All in all it’s a pretty logical move. Braden’s profile has been rising on ESPN telecasts. I can’t say I’ve caught enough of his stuff on the air to know if he’s any good, but he’s always been outspoken and a little off-the-wall. The sort of player who eschewed cliches. That’s probably a good trait to have in this line of work.

While it might be nice for sports broadcasts to get away from hiring ex-players all of the time, if they’re going to do so they should at least try to get a mix of competent analysis and entertainment value. That’s a hard balance, of course — Schilling’s original hire was likely based on him being an outspoken, unpredictable guy and we see how that turned out — but it’s worth trying again. ESPN will now try it with Braden.

Curt Schilling is making up for lost time

Former MLB player Curt Schilling talks with a reporter at the Electronic Entertainment Expo, or E3, in Los Angeles, California June 9, 2011. REUTERS/David McNew
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A day after getting fired it appears that Curt Schilling is making up for lost time on social media. I don’t follow the guy on any platform, but the Daily News has been playing close attention and describe his “social media bender.” 

He’s been posting right wing memes and railing against political correctness and, in the usual ironic twist guys like Schilling often exhibit, is being highly, highly sensitive to criticism in that “me, mad? hahaha, no, I think this is funny, I’m actually laughing at this right now” kind of way which, in reality, masks some pretty decent outrage.

Best bit: he’s been mixing it up with Dodgers pitcher Brandon McCarthy. McCarthy has been intellectual and respectful and is holding an actual debate. Schilling decided that he’d insult McCarthy by claiming that McCarthy’s “life goes on” stance was some sort of failure on par with his having “only” nine career complete games:

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So yeah, that’s all going well. Glad Schilling is keeping busy. And mature.

(Thanks to Josh for the heads up. Schilling blocks me so I didn’t see any of this)