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Pete Rose to manage a team for a single game


Not a major league team, of course, because he’s banned. Or an affiliated minor league team for the same reason. But an independent team is fair game, and the Bridgeport Bluefish of the Atlantic League announced yesterday that Rose will serve as their manager on June 16 against the Lancaster Barnstormers.

The best part of all of this is the statement from Ken Shepard, the Bluefish general manager, who said that this will be “one of the biggest and [most] influential announcements in not only franchise history, but in professional baseball in the last 25 years.” I’d suggest that perhaps Shepard should look up the definition of the word “influential,” but he’s on a roll so we’ll just let him go with it.

In any event, I’m sure this will be a totally dignified affair and Rose will not be encouraged to come out onto the field to argue and otherwise draw attention to himself or anything.

Pete Rose slams Jimmy Rollins for going after a record. PETE ROSE!

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One of the fun things about Pete Rose is that when he was the player/manager for the Reds he put himself in the lineup and at first base so that he could break Ty Cobb’s all-time hit record. Which, to be fair, is what the Reds brass and, I assume, most Reds fans wanted.

Rose wasn’t terrible in 1985 — he got on base at a good clip, but had no power whatsoever — but sabermetrician Craig Wright made a compelling case in a book several years ago that Rose was hurting the Reds by playing himself. I can’t remember the book — if someone does, please chime in — but the upshot was that there were younger players like Nick Esasky either buying buried or who were playing out of position and that the team would have been better off with him or a platoon or something.

No matter which way that actually comes out upon rigorous analytical scrutiny, however, I do think it’s fair to say that Rose’s entire reason for playing in 1985 and 1986 — and more generally, after 1981, really — was to break Ty Cobb’s record. It was his clear goal. Maybe it was a noble goal, but there can be no question that a huge part of Rose’s being was about chasing a record. Which makes his criticism of Jimmy Rollins on 97.5 The Fanatic in Philly today fairly hilarious:

Yes, there has been a lot of talk about Rollins not being willing to waive his no-trade clause until he can set the all-time Phillies hit record this season. But if anyone has a right to call Rollins out for that, it sure as heck ain’t Pete Rose.

Pete Rose is hitting the church circuit

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I sorta came to like casino/memorabilia shop Pete Rose. Church Pete Rose is going to take some getting used to:

Pete Rose, Major League Baseball’s all-time career hit leader, will return to Philadelphia and appear at Christ’s Church of the Valley on Sunday, March 30, 2014. Rose will appear live and be interviewed by Senior Pastor, Brian Jones during each service at 9:00, 10:15 and 11:30 AM.

The linked announcement features the pastor opining that he “truly believe[s] his debt has been paid and should be reinstated.” Which is all well and good, but if I were him I’d need more in the way of reassurances.

Put Rose in charge of Bingo Night for a month. If everything is on the up-and-up, Selig will take a meeting. Cool?

Pete Rose continues to be full of it

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Pete Rose periodically gives interviews in which he says that gambling may be bad, but it’s nowhere near as bad as PEDs are. He has a little rehearsed spiel too, in which he says “ask Babe Ruth, ask Roger Maris, ask Hank Aaron” etc., about how they feel that their records were broken by PED users. He said this almost word-for-word in 2010 and said it again to Michael Kay yesterday:

“They’re both bad. I think in my case, I know I didn’t do anything to alter the statistics of baseball,” Rose said . . . I had nothing to do with altering statistics of baseball, and these guys, that take PEDs—wouldn’t it be nice if you could ask Babe Ruth the same question, or Roger Maris the same question or Hank Aaron, who won’t talk about it. I’d like to hear what their response will be because those are the guys who lost their records because of supposedly steroids.”

At times like this I think it’s worth reminding people that (a) Rose took amphetamines as a player, and they are clearly performance-enhancing (b) Paul Janzen, the man who, according to the Dowd Report, was Rose’s primary bet-placer was also a steroids dealer; (c) one of Rose’s best friends during his gambling days was a minor leaguer, Tommy Gioiosa, who was a heavy steroids user who shot up in front of Pete and to whom Pete constantly asked questions about steroids and PEDs, contemplating using them to extend his already lengthy career. A lengthy career that had him eke just past Ty Cobb for the hit record.

Wouldn’t it be nice, Pete, if you could ask Ty Cobb about that?