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Hall of Fame denies Pete Rose’s request to stand for election

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Bill Shaikin of the Los Angeles Times reports that the Baseball Hall of Fame has denied Pete Rose’s request to stand for election.

Rose had already been denied reinstatement by Major League Baseball. Theoretically, one can be banned from baseball and elected to the Hall of Fame, as they are separate institutions. Not long after Rose’s ban, however, the Hall of Fame changed its rules to prohibit any banned player from appearing on ballots. This move, most assumed, likely correctly, was aimed specifically at Rose. They may be separate institutions, but the Hall of Fame tends to land on all fours with MLB with most things and didn’t want to embarrass the league by giving Rose the honor of induction.

Not that Rose isn’t remembered by the Hall in some respects. As the article notes, there are plenty of Rose artifacts on display in the Hall of Fame. And Hall president Jeff Idelson notes, “[y]ou certainly can’t tell the history of baseball without including Pete Rose.” In this he’s like the PED-era guys who are defacto banned by the BBWAA yet still have their memorabilia on display and their feats chronicled in the museum.

As we’ve noted many, many times around here, if we were in charge, we’d keep Rose banned from baseball as he is utterly unrepentant about his very serious transgressions and has lied about them whenever it has served his interests, either personal or financial. While at 76 he’s not likely to be given a position of real responsibility in the game anymore, it’s not unreasonable to think that he’d be a bad influence if he’s allowed any authority over players. It’s not worth the risk, frankly.

That said: the Hall of Fame is about history, and Rose the ballplayer was one of baseball’s greatest figures. He deserves induction. His fans, of which there are many, would love to see it take place. That the Hall of Fame won’t even allow the possibility of that happening is a shame.

Phillies to induct Pete Rose on the Wall of Fame this summer

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The Phillies announced on Monday that the organization will induct Pete Rose into its Wall of Fame, found in Ashburn Alley at Citizens Bank Park. The ceremony will be held on August 12.

The Phillies have typically inducted one past member of the organization into the Wall of Fame every year. Jim Thome was last year’s inductee. Inductees have typically been former players, but managers (Gavvy Cravath, Dallas Green, Charlie Manuel), coaches (John Vukovich), and broadcasters (Harry Kalas) have also been included.

Rose, now 75, played five seasons with the Phillies between 1979-83. He was considered instrumental in the team winning its first ever championship in 1980 against the Royals, ending a 98-year drought. He also helped the Phillies return to the World Series in 1983, where they lost to the Orioles. In his five seasons in Philadelphia, Rose hit .291/.365/.361.

Rose, of course, is more well-known as a member of the Reds, with which he spent his first 16 seasons. He’s also well-known as baseball’s all-time hits leader at 4,256, but he is not in the Hall of Fame as he was ruled permanently ineligible in 1989 from having bet on baseball.

As a Phillies fan — admittedly one born after Rose’s career ended — I find his induction to be odd. He played less than one-fifth of his career with the team and, while he was considered to be one of the players most responsible for helping the Phillies win it all for the first time, the Phillies have since won another World Series, reducing the need to fetishize the first. Besides, the 1980 team has been well-recognized as is: Paul Owens (1988), Steve Carlton (1989), Mike Schmidt (1990), Larry Bowa (1991), Greg Luzinski (1988), Tug McGraw (1999), Garry Maddox (2001), Bob Boone (2005), Dallas Green (2006), and John Vukovich (2007) have all been honored on the Wall of Fame. Comparatively, only a handful of members of the well-loved 1993 Phillies team — which lost the World Series in heartbreaking fashion to the Blue Jays — have been honored: Darren Daulton (2010), John Kruk (2011), and Curt Schilling (2013).

With Jimmy Rollins on his way out of baseball, this would have been the perfect time for recognizing the impact he had on the organization since making his major league debut in 2000. He won the 2007 NL MVP Award, helped the Phillies win it all in 2008, and helped them nearly win it again the next year. Only two members of the 2008 team have been recognized thus far: Charlie Manuel (2014) and Pat Burrell (2015) — though that’s mostly because many members of that team are still active. Brad Lidge, who went 48-for-48 in save opportunities in 2008 (including the regular season and playoffs), is also a great candidate for the Wall of Fame.

Ultimately, it’s a business decision and the Phillies likely felt that the ignominious Rose would draw more eyeballs than anybody else that they could feasibly honor this summer. And they’re probably not wrong. Those who idolized Rose during his playing days are in the age bracket that consumes the most baseball.

Reds to unveil Pete Rose statue at Great American Ball Park next season

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The Reds announced in a press release earlier this week that the club will unveil a Pete Rose statue at Great American Ball Park on June 17 next year. Rose will be the fourth player with a statue at GABP, joining Johnny Bench, Joe Morgan, and Tony Perez.

Reds COO Phil Castellini said, “The statue of Pete Rose will be the finishing touch on the celebration of Pete here at Great American Ball Park. We had the honor of inducting him into the Reds Hall of Fame and retiring his number in 2016, and I know Pete is looking forward to his statue joining his Big Red Machine teammates on Crosley Terrace.”

Rose, 75, is baseball’s all-time leader in hits with 4,256. He helped the Reds win the World Series in 1975 and ’76, overall helping them reach the postseason five times in a span of seven years between 1970-76.

Rose has been working as an analyst for FOX for the past two years.