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Carlos Correa is in The Best Shape of His Life


source: Getty Images

This is the first ever BSOHL HardballTalk has featured in Spanish!

“Me siento al 100%. Mentalmente preparado. Eso (la lesión) nunca ha sido un issue. Siempre he estado mentalmente fuerte para las adversidades que hay que sobrepasar, y en este deporte hay que pasar muchas”, manifestó el campocorto santaisabelino.

“Físicamente me siento en mi mejor momento. Mejor que el año pasado. He aumentado de peso, he adquirido más fuerza y rapidez, y el entrenamiento que hemos hecho todo el año ha salido a relucir”, agregó el jugador, manifestando algo detectable desde antes de estrecharle la mano.

Una espalda más ancha, así como unos brazos más definidos y anchos, castigan las pelotas que le lanzan durante esta sesión en el Hiram Bithorn, donde fue obvia la transformación en el cuerpo de la primera selección del ‘draft’ del 2012.

“Su cuerpo ha cambiado totalmente”, dijo su entrenador físico, Ulises Rosario. “Para este año nos enfocamos en fortalecerlo para que borrara lo que sucedió (la pequeña fractura en su peroné o fíbula) y recuperara la confianza. Desde el primer día vi su buena actitud y creo que no mencionó la lesión una sola vez”.

Thanks to reader Scott Simon for the heads up. And thanks to Google translate for the rough translation job. Which, while obviously not perfect, makes it quote clear that this is a BSHOL article, what with talk about adding bulk, obvious physical transformations and the strong downplay of his previous injury. Because, remember, BSOHL is rarely about actually being in the BSOHL. It’s usually an article either spinning an off-year or injury-plagued season.

Not that Correa needs too much spin. Before he fractured his leg last year he was having an excellent season, hitting .325 with 20 steals in 62 games at high Single-A as a 19-year-old. Even with the injury, he’s still well ahead of where most top prospects are at his age.

Maicer Izturis is in the best shape of his life

Maicer Izturis AP

There was a Blue Jays “State of the Franchise” event last night and John Gibbons was asked about who was going to play second base for Toronto. While he noted that there are four candidates, one of whom is Maicer Izturis, he said:

“Izturis is in the best shape of his life.”

So I guess that’s settled.

(Thanks to Rik for the heads up)

Avisail Garcia is in The Best Shape of His Life

Avisail Garcia

No one used the magic words in this article, but a year after a season lost to injury + lots of talk about being slimmer, trimmer and faster = BSOHL stuff:

Williams added that Garcia looks slim and trim, a fact confirmed by anybody who ran into him this past weekend at SoxFest. Garcia smiled and guessed that he dropped about 15 pounds but wasn’t as worried about the total as much as how getting prepared will help him.

“I’ve been eating healthy, working real hard at the gym. I have to be ready for Spring Training,” Garcia said. “I can’t go there and be fat. So that’s what happens. I know I’m skinny.”

Garcia is a talent, to be sure. The sort of talent that had many people comparing him to Miguel Cabrera when he was in Detroit. And now, like Cabrera, Garcia is a BSOHL All-Star.

(Thanks to Scott S. for the heads up)

I don’t know if Dustin Pedroia is in the Best Shape of His life, but he IS posing with his shirt off

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There’s a snow storm bearing down on the country’s media nerve center. Basically everyone at NBC except Gleeman and me are out in Arizona for some football game. It’s 5pm and my kids’ school was closed so it’s been kind of a hectic day around here. So let us wind down and relax with some topless Dustin Pedroia.


Laser show.

Jesus Montero is in The Best Shape of His Life, Part II

Seattle Mariners v Chicago Cubs

Back on New Year’s Eve we noted that Mariners “catcher” Jesus Montero had lost some 30-35 pounds. Now it’s apparently 40 pounds, as this more in-depth report from John McGrath of the News-Tribune about Montero’s offseason transformation reveals.

More importantly, it reveals that the Mariners, though they would have every justification to, have not given up on Montero. They have not given up despite his regression as a player, his knuckleheaded antics off-the-field and the fact that, at present, he doesn’t seem to have a position.

He may not play into the Mariners’ big league plans at all this year. But at Triple-A last year an out-of-shape and unfocused Montero hit .286/.350/.489 with 16 home runs and 74 RBI over 97 games. Imagine what a dedicated, in shape Montero might yet do.