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2015 BBWAA Awards finalists announced on MLB Network


The Baseball Writers Association of America is revealing the top three finalists for American League and National League Rookie of the Year, Manager of the Year, Cy Young, and Most Valuable Player during a one-hour special starting at 6:00 p.m. ET on MLB Network. We’ll post the names here as they are announced …

National League Rookie of the Year

Kris Bryant, 3B, Cubs
Matt Duffy, 3B, Giants
Jung Ho Kang, SS, Pirates

American League Rookie of the Year

Carlos Correa, SS, Astros
Francisco Lindor, SS, Indians
Miguel Sano, DH, Twins

National League Manager of the Year

Terry Collins, Mets
Joe Maddon, Cubs
Mike Matheny, Cardinals

American League Manager of the Year

Jeff Banister, Rangers
A.J. Hinch, Astros
Paul Molitor, Twins

National League Cy Young Award

Jake Arrieta, SP, Cubs
Zack Greinke, SP, Dodgers
Clayton Kershaw, SP, Dodgers

American League Cy Young Award

Sonny Gray, SP, Athletics
Dallas Keuchel, SP, Astros
David Price, SP, Blue Jays

National League MVP

Paul Goldschmidt, 1B, Diamondbacks
Bryce Harper, OF, Nationals
Joey Votto, 1B, Reds

American League MVP

Lorenzo Cain, OF, Royals
Josh Donaldson, 3B, Blue Jays
Mike Trout, OF, Angels


The official award winners will come out next week. Here is the schedule …

  • Monday, November 16: AL & NL Rookie of the Year
  • Tuesday, November 17: AL & NL Manager of the Year
  • Wednesday, November 18: AL & NL Cy Young Award
  • Thursday, November 19: AL & NL Most Valuable Player

Matt Harvey, Prince Fielder win Comeback Player of the Year Awards

Matt Harvey

You never want to be a candidate for the Comeback Player of the Year Award — it means bad stuff happened, right? — but if you do find yourself needing to bounce back  it sure must feel like some good validation to win it. This year’s two winners were just announced: Matt Harvey in the NL, Prince Fielder in the AL.

Harvey missed the entire 2014 season following Tommy John surgery. And, while there were controversies regarding his usage by the Mets, he had a great comeback season. He posted a 2.71 ERA in 29 regular-season starts and struck out 188 batters in 189.1 regular season innings. He likewise pitched four times in the playoffs, including an excellent, though ultimately losing, Game 5.

Fielder appeared in just 42 games last season before requiring season-ending surgery on his neck in 2014. He came back and put up a .305/.378/.463 line with 23 home runs and 98 RBI while playing in 158 games and helping the Rangers win the American League West.

Normally a player who missed an entire year and then put up .250/.356/.486 with 33 homers at age 40 would get strong consideration, but I suppose that when your name is Alex Rodriguez and the reason you missed a year was because of your own malfeasance, that’s gonna count against you with the voters.

The awards you care about will be announced November 16-19

Washington Nationals' Bryce Harper blows a bubble as he steps out of the batter's box during the first inning of a baseball game against the Atlanta Braves at Nationals Park, Sunday, Sept. 6, 2015, in Washington. Harper flew out on the at-bat. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

The end of the World Series means the beginning of the hot stove league. It also means the beginning of awards season.

There are more award now than ever. The BBWAA awards like the MVP and Cy Young Award we all know and love (and all love to fight about). MLB’s own shadow award that no one really cares about. The Gold Glove Awards which, venerable name aside, are completely irrelevant. Then some sponsored awards we forget exist each year until the moment they’re given and immediately forget again thereafter.

Major League Baseball just announced the timing of the handing out of these awards. At least the ones they broadcast on their television network. Plan your schedule accordingly:

  • Monday, November 9, 8:00 p.m. ET: Players Choice Awards presented by MLB The Show
  • Tuesday, November 10, 6:00 p.m. ET: BBWAA Awards finalists
  • Wednesday, November 11, 6:00 p.m. ET: Wilson Defensive Player of the Year Awards
  • Thursday, November 12, 6:00 p.m. ET: Silver Slugger Awards presented by Louisville Slugger
  • Monday, November 16, 6:00 p.m. ET: BBWAA Rookie of the Year Awards
  • Tuesday, November 17, 6:00 p.m. ET: BBWAA Manager of the Year Awards
  • Wednesday, November 18, 6:00 p.m. ET: BBWAA Cy Young Awards
  • Thursday, November 19, 6:00 p.m. ET: BBWAA Most Valuable Player Awards
  • Friday, November 20, 8:00 p.m. ET: 2015 Esurance MLB Awards

So, basically, November 16-19 is all any of will really care about. And, if you’d like to just avoid watching these shows, check back here about the same time as we’ll be posting the winners. Because no matter how hard MLB tries to make entertainment out of these awards, they’re basically just news nuggets.

Andrew Miller, Mark Melancon claim Reliever of the Year awards

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MLB on Twitter

Just ahead of Game 2 of the World Series, Major League Baseball has announced that Yankees closer Andrew Miller and Pirates closer Mark Melancon are the recipients of this year’s Reliever of the Year awards.

It’s called the Mariano Rivera Award in the American League and the Trevor Hoffman Award in the National League.

Miller, a 30-year-old left-hander, posted a 2.04 ERA and 100 strikeouts in 61 2/3 innings this season for New York while tallying 36 saves. He signed a four-year, $36 million free agent contract with the Yankees last winter and is living up to that lofty price tag thus far.

Melancon had a 2.23 ERA and a league-leading 51 saves in 76 2/3 innings with the Pirates. The 30-year-old right-hander is eligible for arbitration for the final time this winter.

The two pitchers were present Wednesday at Kauffman Stadium to receive their awards.

Who should win the Manager of the Year Awards? Who Will?

Joe Maddon

With the regular season ending on Sunday and almost all of the playoff spots locked up, there’s really only one big thing left to argue about: postseason awards. Yesterday and today’s we’ve been spending some time looking at who should win each of the four major awards and who will win them. Which are often totally different things. The last one up: Managers of the Year

Can we agree, less than a year after Matt Williams won the NL Manager of the Year Award, that the Manager of the Year Award is about as silly and meaningless as an award can be? What’s more likely: (a) Williams was an amazing manager last year who suddenly forgot what the hell he was doing and totally destroyed his team this year; or (b) that his winning the Manager of the Year Award was really about stories and expectations and the preconceived notions of people in the media?

For that matter, let’s say Joe Maddon wins it this year, as he very well may. Does it really mean anything? We knew he was a good manager before this year, of course, but if the Cubs had finished in fourth place instead of third or possibly second place he certainly would not win it, right? Hell, a third place finish with the Cubs not making the playoffs probably means he doesn’t win it. So he sucks and someone is better?

Bruce Bochy and Clint Hurdle are considered great managers. They’re not getting hardware. Hell, Bochy has NEVER won it. UPDATE: Sorry, Bochy won it back when he was with the Padres. He’s never won it as Giants manager, despite three World Series titles. Joe Girardi does a fantastic job year after year and never gets consideration (the one time he did win it, with the Marlins, he got fired). Buck Showalter is considered one of the best and won it last year, suddenly he’s not doing an award-worthy job?

Hogwash. The Manager of the Year Award is about upsetting expectations and predictions. If a team is overrated or expected to do great things and fails, the blame is inordinately placed on the shoulders of the manager. Likewise, if a team is underrated or isn’t expected to do great things and does, we reward the manager with a nice shiny award. That’s about all there is to it. I mean for Pete’s sake, look at this list from

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After Matt Williams is shown the door, five of the past ten Managers of the Year will have been fired or, at the very least, strongly nudged to retire. As a shorthand for skill and merit, the Manager of the Year Award isn’t worth the bronze it’s engraved upon. So, forgive me if I don’t engage in the same sort of “analysis” of this award than I do of the others. The nature of the award defies it and we’re left to just jump into The Narrative River in an Inner-Tube of Denial and float on down to the Gulf of Go With It:

Who should win the AL Manager of the Year Award?

Buck Showalter is probably the best AL Manager but the Orioles didn’t do well so he won’t win it. I think Joe Girardi has done a great job putting out a lineup full of banged up old guys all year, supplementing with young guys who may not have gotten a chance from more conservative managers and, once again, did a great job with his pen. But he won’t win it because voters think the Yankees manager should win 100 games based on payroll alone even though baseball doesn’t work like that.

If we just go with the narrative stuff, Jeff Banister is probably the guy as the Rangers weren’t expected to do anything and had key injuries yet are going to win the AL West. Before the Rangers surged it was probably going to be A.J. Hinch for the same reason. See how that works?

Who will win the AL Manager of the Year Award?

Banister, I figure. And hey, he’s done a good job, so why not?


Who should win the NL Manager of the Year Award?

There’s a lot of managerial talent in the NL. As mentioned above, Bruce Bochy is a Hall of Fame manager and Clint Hurdle has done a great job with the Pirates for a few years now. Joe Maddon, likewise, is considered one of the best managers in baseball for good reason. I mean, it’s no accident that the Cubs threw their old manager over the side when Maddon became available last offseason.

Mike Matheny is often derided as a poor tactical manager, but if any other guy lost his ace at the beginning of the year, lost his all-world catcher to injury (after he spent all year underperforming) and had his big left field bat on the DL for much of the season and STILL won 100 games and cruised in the toughest division in living memory, he’d be a shoe-in. But Matheny won’t win it because of those preconceived notions about his abilities and because the Cardinals were, generally speaking, expected to do well anyway.

And what about Terry Collins? The Mets were expected to be kinda interesting this year, but not a division winner. Are people selling him short because the Nationals are thought of having failed more than the Mets succeeded? But, hey, don’t the Nats have the reigning Manager of the Year?! Isn’t overcoming them worthy of honor?

Maddon, though, has the Cubs in the playoffs a year or two earlier than anyone thought they’d be and, I suppose, he’s just as good a choice as anyone else.

Who will win the NL Manager of the Year Award?

Maddon probably will.

But you see how this works.