<span class="vcard">Matthew Pouliot</span>

Jeffrey Loria

It’s time for Bud Selig to force Jeffrey Loria out of MLB

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Jeffrey Loria has long been on the short list of MLB’s worst owners, but he’s truly outdone himself now by trading Jose Reyes and Mark Buehrle, just one year after signing them to long-term deals, along with Josh Johnson, Emilio Bonifacio and John Buck to the Blue Jays on Tuesday.

Of course, the topper is that the move comes one year after the Marlins opened a new publicly funded stadium in Miami.

Loria amassed his fortune as an art dealer. Now he looks like a scam artist. Certainly the bait-and-switch has rarely been pulled off so artfully.

The Marlins had a $95 million payroll in 2012 after signing a trio of big-name free agents in Reyes, Buehrle and Heath Bell last winter. Now all three are gone, with a combined 10 seasons left on their contracts. Also gone are the team’s two most expensive holdovers in Hanley Ramirez and Johnson.

What’s left is a shell of a franchise, one that will almost certainly have the lowest payroll in baseball. More importantly, it will have no credibility in the eyes of its employees or fans. It’s lone remaining star, Giancarlo Stanton, has already expressed his anger. It’s hard to imagine him ever signing a long-term deal with the club, which could mean he’ll be the big name to go next winter.

Loria has now entered two markets and all but wrecked baseball for both of them. It’s in the best interests of the game that he exit for good. Commissioner Bud Selig should step in and apply as much pressure as he legally can in order to get Loria to sell. Otherwise, Loria and the deal that allowed him to trade the Montreal Expos for the Marlins will go down as black marks on Selig’s legacy.

Bob Melvin scores narrow AL Manager of the Year victory

Bob Melvin
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Just as it should have been, Oakland’s Bob Melvin and Baltimore’s Buck Showalter claimed the top two spots on all 28 AL Manager of the Year ballots. Melvin, though, scored the win with 16 first-place votes to Showalter’s 12.

Rookie manager Robin Ventura of the White Sox came in third place with 12 third-place votes. Joe Maddon was fourth, followed by Joe Girardi. Jim Leyland and Ron Washington were named on two ballots apiece.

Melvin’s Athletics went 94-68 to win the AL West in his first full year at the helm. He replaced Bob Geren in June 2011 with the team off to a 27-36 start and then went 47-52 the rest of the way for a 74-88 finish.

Melvin also won the NL Manager of the Year award with the Diamondbacks in 2007, so he joins Davey Johnson, Tony La Russa, Jim Leyland, Bobby Cox and Lou Piniella as managers to win in both leagues.

That’s pretty good company for a manager whose lifetime winning percentage is .502 (634-628) in nine seasons.

Davey Johnson named National League Manager of the Year

St Louis Cardinals v Washington Nationals - Game Five
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Fresh off his new one-year deal and retirement announcement, the Nationals’ Davey Johnson claimed 23 of the 32 first-place votes to win his first National League Manager of the Year award on Tuesday.

Johnson also won the American League award with the Orioles in 1997. He’s the first Expos/Nationals manager to win the award since Felipe Alou in the strike-shortened 1994 season.

Johnson’s Nationals won 98 games in his first year of the helm, 18 more than in 2011. The team lost the NLDS in five games to the Cardinals.

The Reds’ Dusty Baker finished second to Johnson, claiming five first-place votes. The Giants’ Bruce Bochy got four first-place votes and finished in third place.

According to the BBWAA, Johnson joins Bobby Cox, Tony La Russa, Jim Leyland and Lou Piniella as the only managers to win the award in both leagues.

Mike Trout is unanimous AL Rookie of the Year winner

Mike Trout
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There’s plenty of room for debate when it comes to this year’s BBWAA awards, but there was one certainly; despite an historically awesome crop of competitors, Mike Trout would win American League Rookie of the Year honors in a landslide.

The official announcement came Monday, with Trout claiming the top spot on all 28 ballots. Yoenis Cespedes finished second, followed by Yu Darvish in third.

Left out of the mix were pitchers Jarrod Parker (13-8, 3.47  ERA), Wei-Yin Chen (12-11, 4.02 ERA), Tommy Milone (13-10, 3.74 ERA), Ryan Cook 2.09 ERA, 14 Sv), Matt Moore (11-11, 3.81 ERA) and Scott Diamond (12-9, 3.54 ERA), all of whom would have strong threats to finish in the top three most years.

Trout hit .326/.399/.564 with 30 homers and 83 RBI last season despite spending most of the first month in the minors. He finished second in the AL to Miguel Cabrera in both average and OPS. He led the league with 129 runs scored and 49 steals.

It would have been a much more intriguing vote had MLB not restored Trout’s rookie eligibility after it was originally ruled to have expired. Trout spent 38 non-September days on the Angels’ active roster in 2011, which is under the 45-day limit for rookies, but he was credited with an extra 17 days of service time because of a quick recall from the minors following a demotion. MLB correctly decided that the extra service time, while officially part of his record, shouldn’t count against his rookie status.

Next up for Trout is a likely second-place finish to Cabrera in the AL MVP balloting. That announcement got a whole lot more interesting today with the news that the BBWAA will be releasing the individual ballots for each award.

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Update: The BBWAA has released the ballots.

Cody Ross would be a waste of money for Orioles

Cody Ross
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Based on the strength of a .267/.326/.481 campaign with Boston, free agent Cody Ross is seeking a three-year deal worth at least $6 million and maybe as much as $8 million per season. Word is that the Orioles are one of the teams pursuing him.

They shouldn’t be.

In Nolan Reimold, the Orioles have a right-handed-hitting outfielder with a career line of .261/.338/.455 in 808 major league at-bats.

Ross, the older of the two by nearly three years, has a .262/.324/.460 line in 2,912 at-bats. And he’ll probably make at least five times as much as Reimold next year.

The only reason for the Orioles to consider Ross is if they don’t think Reimold can come back from last year’s neck surgery to fuse together two vertebrae. Reimold, though, has resumed working out and is expected to be ready to go in spring training. If Reimold is back at 100 percent, then Ross isn’t any kind of upgrade for Baltimore. He’d probably be a downgrade.

By signing Ross, the Orioles would simply be paying for certainty. And it’s not worth it, particularly not with a $20 million price tag. Ross isn’t any sort of star. He hammers left-handers, but he’ll probably revert to being below average against right-handers outside of Fenway Park next season (Ross hit .298/.356/.565 in Boston last season and .232/.294/.390 everywhere else). He’s a career .253/.312/.415 hitter against righties.

When it comes to left field, the Orioles either need to go big or stay home. It’s worth weighing the pros and cons of Josh Hamilton and maybe seeing if they have the right pieces to intrigue the Diamondbacks on a Justin Upton trade. But unless they can get a star, they should stick with Reimold and maybe re-sign Nate McLouth as a fallback. If that doesn’t work out, they can trade for another solution come June or July. But even in the worst case, it’s hard to imagine a scenario in which they’re going to be really disappointed about missing out on Cody Ross.