Author: Matthew Pouliot

Ricky Nolasco

Report: Dodgers, Marlins talking Ricky Nolasco trade


Mark Saxon of says the Dodgers and Marlins are engaging in trade talks involving Ricky Nolasco.

While rotation depth was supposed to be a major strength for the Dodgers this year, the team has lost Chad Billingsley and Josh Beckett to injury and has gotten little from Ted Lilly so far. The team’s rotation currently includes Clayton Kershaw, Zack Greinke, Hyun-Jin Ryu, Chris Capuano and rookie Stephen Fife.

Nolasco has a 4-7 record for the Marlins, but it comes with a nice 3.68 ERA and 1.20 WHIP. With 77 K’s in 100 1/3 IP, his strikeout rate has also bounced back from last year’s decline.

The 30-year-old Nolasco is a free agent at season’s end, and the Marlins aren’t going to care to ante up and re-sign him. If he doesn’t go to the Dodgers, it’s quite possible he’ll be traded to one of their NL West rivals in the coming weeks. That gives the Dodgers extra incentive to get a deal done now.

The Marlins will likely seek young pitching in return for Nolasco. Right-handers Zach Lee and Ross Stripling and left-hander Chris Reed could be high on their list.

Shaun Marcum shuts down White Sox to avoid 0-10 start

Shaun Marcum

After nine straight losses to begin the season, the Mets’ Shaun Marcum blanked the White Sox for eight innings on Wednesday and picked up his first victory in a 3-0 game.

Bobby Parnell pitched a perfect ninth for his 13th save.

Marcum was in danger of becoming the first pitcher since the Cardinals’ Anthony Reyes in 2007 to start 0-10. He was the sixth pitcher to start 0-9 since 2000, joining Mike Maroth (2003 Tigers), Edgar Gonzalez (2004 Diamondbacks), Reyes, Kenshin Kawakami (2010 Braves) and Chris Volstad (2012 Cubs).

Marcum allowed just four hits over eight innings while facing what should be considered the American League’s worst offense. The White Sox had outscored the Mariners entered the night (3.74 runs per game to 3.60), but they have a big ballpark advantage over Seattle. They had the league’s worst OBP (.296) and OPS (.673), and both of those figures took another hit tonight.

Mark Teixeira’s contract another expensive miscue for Yankees

Mark Teixeira

When it was signed following the 2008 season, Mark Teixeira’s eight-year, $180 million deal with the Yankees was the third biggest in MLB history and largest to go to someone not named Alex Rodriguez. Now it rivals Rodriguez’s as one of the worst in baseball.

With the news Wednesday that Teixeira would undergo wrist surgery, the 33-year-old first baseman ends his fifth season with the Yankees having played in just 15 games and hitting .151. The Yankees are still on the hook for another three years and $67.5 million after paying him $22.5 million this season.

If it were just the wrist injury, there’d be better reason for hope that Teixeira could come back and be a quality regular, if not an All-Star, next year. But he already seemed to be in obvious decline before 2013. Here are his OPSs and OPS+s since 2007.

2007: .963 – 149 – Rangers/Braves
2008: .962 – 152 – Braves/Angels
2009: .948 – 141 – Yankees
2010: .846 – 124 – Yankees
2011: .835 – 121 – Yankees
2012: .807 – 116 – Yankees

The Yankees would surely take it if Teixeira could come back and be a 120 OPS+ first baseman in the last three years of his deal. He wouldn’t be worth nearly $22.5 million per year in that scenario, but that’d still make him an above average regular at first base.

It’s probably overly optimistic, though. While Jose Bautista has come back and produced since returning from a similar tendon sheath surgery, he hasn’t been nearly what he was in the two years before he got hurt. He was also a couple of years younger than Teixeira will be. Mark DeRosa’s wrist problems ended his career as a regular. Nomar Garciaparra came back and had his moments, but he was never the same quality of player after Al Reyes hit him in the wrist.

So, the Yankees should be very worried. That they’ll be overpaying Teixeira and Rodriguez going forward is a given. Maybe CC Sabathia, too. But as long as those guys are reasonably productive, then the Yankees should continue to contend. If those players become liabilities on the field as well as in the budget, that’s the recipe for disaster.