Author: Matthew Pouliot

Jonny Gomes

Report: Jonny Gomes gets $10 million from Red Sox


The Cody Ross era in Boston appears over. The Red Sox have agreed to terms with Jonny Gomes on a two-year deal that’s worth $10 million, according to the San Francisco Chronicle’s Susan Slusser.

The $5 million annual salary is four times more than Gomes has ever earned before. He made $1 million while hitting .262/.377/.491 in his lone season with the A’s.

The Red Sox are paying a steep price for a guy who belongs on the bad side of a platoon. Gomes has  hit .284/.382/.512 against lefties and .223/.307/.425 against righties in his career. That line against righties isn’t so bad, but considering that Gomes is a subpar defender, he’s a poor option as a full-time player.

It’s hard to imagine the Red Sox now re-signing Ross. The two are essentially the same hitter; Ross has come in at .284/.353/.575 hitter against lefties and .253/.312/.415 against righties in his career. Ross is the clearly superior defender and thus is a better option as a starter against righties. However, he was believed to be asking for something in the neighborhood of $24 million for three years.

Gomes will join Daniel Nava, Ryan Sweeney, Ryan Kalish and Jerry Sands in the mix for corner outfield at-bats in Boston.  Ideally, Kalish, the biggest talent in the bunch, would step up and claim the right field job, at least against righties.

Scott Rolen is still weighing a retirement decision

Scott Rolen

ESPN’s Jayson Stark has the pre-turkey day scuttlebutt:

On the one hand, Rolen had a pretty miserable NLDS against the Giants in October. On the other, he hit a pretty terrific .297/.376/.473 with five homers in 165 at-bats after the All-Star break. He’d seem to be quite an asset starting twice per week and teaching Todd Frazier the finer points of third base. The danger there is that Dusty Baker might be tempted to go back to him as a starter if Frazier turns in a poor April.

Still, the Reds might as well leave the spot open for him. Miguel Cairo will still be out there in February if Rolen decides he’s done.

Former big leaguer Frank Pastore in coma after wreck

Frank Pastore

Frank Pastore, who spent seven of his eight major league seasons with the Reds from 1979-86, is in a coma after after being injured in a car accident Monday night.

“I just hope everyone is praying for him. This is a shock to all of us,” Pastore’s mother-in-law told the Inland Valley Daily Bulletin.  “He’s a very good person. A Christian person. At this time, it’s very hard. He’s loved by everyone.”

Pastore was driving a motorcycle when he was struck by a car. According to California Highway Patrol Sgt. Aaron Knarr, the driver of the car lost control and hit Pastore’s Honda Shadow in the car pool lane. The driver of the car wasn’t hurt and was not intoxicated.

Pastore, 55, hosts a radio show on a Christian station based in Los Angeles. He went 48-58 with a 4.29 ERA in 139 starts and 81 relief appearances in his major league career, which concluded with the Twins in 1986. He had his best season in 1980, going 13-7 with a 3.27 ERA in 27 starts for Cincinnati.

Diamondbacks-Rockies swap Matt Reynolds, Ryan Wheeler

Matt Reynolds

A few weeks after acquiring Heath Bell, the Diamondbacks made another addition to their bullpen on Tuesday, picking up lefty Matt Reynolds from the Diamondbacks for infielder Ryan Wheeler.

Reynolds, 28, had a nice debut with the Rockies in 2010 but was pretty mediocre since, amassing a 4.09 ERA in 2011 and a 4.40 ERA in 2011. While he’s been used primarily as a specialist, he’s only been a bit better against lefties (.262/.309/.459) than righties (.259/.323/.506) in his career. The Diamondbacks are apparently banking on the fact that he’s been quite a bit better on the road (.210/.290/.435) than in Coors Field (.294/.333/.514) in his career.

Wheeler, 24, came up this year and hit .239/.294/.339 with one homer in 109 at-bats for the Diamondbacks. He hit .351/.388/.572 in 362 at-bats for Triple-A Reno before his callup, but that was in a very friendly offensive environment. He hit .294/.358/.465 in Double-A in 2011.

Wheeler is a long shot to make it as a regular — his glove won’t be a big asset at third and he probably won’t have the bat for first — but he makes plenty of sense for a Rockies team that isn’t quite set at either corner infield position. Plus, now the team can find someone better than Reynolds for a specialist role, if it opts to carry a specialist at all.

Blue Jays to bring back John Gibbons as manager

John Gibbons

While all indications were that the Blue Jays planned to bring in a retread as John Farrell’s replacement on the bench, who knew it’d again be one of their own? John Gibbons, who managed the team from 2004-08, will reclaim the job, the Toronto Sun reports.

Gibbons had a 305-305 record in three full and two partial seasons in his first stint at the helm of the Jays. It was his only gig as a major league manager. When he was fired after a 35-39 start in 2008, he was replaced by another former Jays manager, Cito Gaston.

The hiring, expected to be officially announced Tuesday, will come one day after the team officially acquired shortstop Jose Reyes, right-hander Josh Johnson and left-hander Mark Buehrle in a 12-player deal.

Gibbons’ original Toronto stint is best remembered for his confrontations with players Shea Hillenbrand and Ted Lilly. Hillenbrand was traded just a few days after taking on Gibbons, while Lilly and Gibbons made up not long after their blow-up.

Still, the bigger problem with Gibbons was his tendency to stick with underperforming veterans. Part of it was the hand he was dealt, but he always seemed to be most comfortable sticking with his veteran role players.

Maybe that won’t make much of a difference now, since the Jays have assembled a high-payroll team and don’t have a bunch of prospects knocking down the door (they still have some talent, but much of it remains at least a year or two away from the majors). How he handles the bullpen will be a big key for him, particularly if the Jays fail to acquire an experienced closer. They have plenty of talented arms, but it remains to be seen whether Gibbons will favor experience over talent. After all, this is a guy who once let Miguel Batista rack up 31 saves.