Author: Matthew Pouliot

Tim Lincecum

Tim Lincecum hurls no-hitter against Padres


It took a whopping 148 pitches, but Tim Lincecum recorded his first career no-hitter Saturday in the Giants’ 9-0 victory over the Padres.

It was the most pitches thrown in a game since Edwin Jackson got to 149 in his no-hitter for the Diamondbacks on June 25, 2010 and the second most since 2005. Lincecum’s previous career high was 138 pitches in a four-hit shutout, also against the Padres, back on Sept. 13, 2008.

Lincecum struck out 13, matching the second highest total of his career. His previous high was 15 in a complete game against the Pirates in 2009. It was his sixth career shutout.

With the Giants struggling of late — at least until they ran into the Padres — Lincecum’s name has been bandied about as a trade possibility of late. One wonders just how the huge pitch count will play into that. After Jackson threw his 149 pitches in 2010, he went five straight outings without turning in a quality start. Lincecum’s win tonight was his first in his last seven starts, though he did pitched better in June than he did the first two months of the season. The Giants also have the ability to give him plenty of rest after this one, what with the All-Star break set to begin.

But let’s not the pitch count overshadow the performance. Lincecum certainly wasn’t worried; he threw a 3-2 curve to walk Everth Cabrera on his 125th pitch of the night in the eighth. Alexi Amarista then came the closest of any Padre to getting a hit tonight; lining out to a sliding Hunter Pence in right field. It wasn’t only Lincecum’s first shutout in a long time, but it was his first complete game since May 21, 2011, when he pitched a three-hitter against the A’s. It had been almost exactly a year — since July 14, 2012 — that he had lasted more than seven innings in a start.

Lincecum is now 5-9 with a 4.26 ERA for the season. He’s tied for sixth in the NL with 125 strikeouts.

Josh Phegley is the new Yasiel Puig

Josh Phegley

Puigmania is over. It’s old news. Could there be any better illustration than the fact that Freddie Freeman beat out Yasiel in a popularity contest this week?

It’s OK, though. White Sox catcher Josh Phegley is the new big thing. He hit a grand slam Thursday in the White Sox’s 6-3 win over the Tigers, giving him three homers in his first five games.

The 25-year-old Phegley is the 29th player in major league history to hit three homers in his first five games. Only Mike Jacobs and Puig have managed four. Other recent players to hit three include Manny Machado, Yoenis Cespedes, Will Middlebrooks and Yasmani Grandal.

Phegley’s eight RBI through five games is tied for the 10th highest total in big league history. Jack Merson, Danny Espinosa and Puig had 10 RBI through five games. Hall of Famer Paul Molitor is among the players with nine.

A 2009 supplemental first-round pick out of Indiana, Phegley took a big step forward by hitting .316/.368/.597 with 15 homers in 231 at-bats for Triple-A Charlotte prior to his callup last week. He hit just .266/.306/.373 with six homers in 394 at-bats last year for the same team. While this year may prove to be something of a fluke for him offensively, he has overtaken Tyler Flowers in the White Sox’s plans, and he’s probably going to be the team’s primary catcher going forward.

Now if only Salvador Perez will back out so we can get him on the All-Star team where he belongs.

Carlos Gonzalez out, Pedro Alvarez in for Home Run Derby

Pedro Alvarez

Carlos Gonzalez isn’t too banged up to play for the Rockies or to participate in next week’s All-Star Game, but due to his finger injury, he has opted out of Monday’s Home Run Derby.

Replacing Gonzalez on the NL squad is Pittsburgh’s Pedro Alvarez. Alvarez is tied with the Phillies’ Domonic Brown for second place in the league with 23 homers, one behind Gonzalez. Yet both Alvarez and Brown went unpicked as NL captain initially selected Michael Cuddyer and Bryce Harper to round out his four-man squad.

Alvarez probably was the best choice of the options. While Brown has just as many homers, his average homer has been estimated at just 380.5 feet. That ranks dead last among all players with at least 10 homers, according to Alvarez comes in at 406.7 feet, which, while not approaching Justin Upton’s MLB-best 428.0 mark, is at least above the median. He also leads the majors with nine “no doubt” home runs, as hittrackeronline describes them.

The 26-year-old Alvarez is a first-time All-Star this year. He’s recovered from a lousy April to hit .253/.315/.521 with 60 RBI in 82 games to date.