Matthew Pouliot

Quincy Nieporte, Richie Martin

2015 MLB Draft: Picks 19-26 – Pirates, A’s add shortstops

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No. 19 – Pirates – Arizona shortstop Kevin Newman

Newman is never going to offer much power, and he lacks the range to be a plus defensive shortstop, though he might prove adequate there or above average at second base. His calling card is his ability to hit for average, and he could be a No. 2-hitting second baseman for the Pirates down the line.

No. 20 – Athletics – Florida shortstop Richie Martin

Another college shortstop off the board. Of the four taken so far, Martin offers the most defensively, but he has the biggest questions about his bat. He hit just one homer in his first two seasons at Florida before coming through with five this season. Overall, he hit .292/.404/.424 with 20 steals. He’d seem to have a really good chance of becoming a major league regular someday, but it might be as a bottom-of-the-order guy.

No. 21  – Royals – high school right-hander Ashe Russell

This is the first time the Royals have used their first pick on a high school pitcher since they got Zack Greinke sixth overall in 2002. Russell has a moving 92-94 mph fastball and a quality slider, and he has one of the highest ceilings available. He will need to come up with a better changeup.

No. 22 – Tigers – high school right-hander Beau Burrows

Burrows throws in the mid-90s and offers one of the best curveballs in the draft, but control is an issue for him and he probably won’t move very quickly. Both he and Russell are committed to Texas A&M, but they should prove signable.

No. 23 – Cardinals – high school outfielder Nick Plummer

The Cardinals often seem to hit with these picks, so Plummer will get the benefit of the doubt. His stock was higher last year, but he didn’t meet expectations in his senior season. He might prove to be one of the best bats in the draft if he cleans up his swing. Plummer is listed at 5-foot-10 and 200 pounds, but he might last in center field anyway.

No. 24 – Dodgers – Vanderbilt right-hander Walker Buehler

The third Commodore selected, Buehler had a 2.97 ERA and an 81/25 K/BB ratio in 78 2/3 innings as the team’s No. 2 starter. He missed some time early in the year with elbow soreness, but he came back strong enough to remain a first-round option.

No. 25 – Orioles – Florida St. outfielder D.J. Stewart

Stewart is a left-handed-hitting left fielder with on-base ability and power. It’ll be interesting to see if the Orioles alter his exaggerated batting stance in an effort to make him a more consistent power threat. His bat will have to carry him since he’s not going to offer much defensive value.

No. 26 – Angels – Fresno State catcher Taylor Ward

A second catcher went in the first round after all. Aside from maybe 12th pick Josh Naylor, this rates as the biggest surprise of the draft so far. Ward is a quality defensive catcher, but most experts don’t think he’ll hit enough to become a major league regular. The Angels clearly targeted him, so they believe they know something others don’t.

2015 MLB Draft: Picks 11-18 – Indians take Brady Aiken at No. 17

James Kaprielian
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No. 11 pick – Reds – high school catcher Tyler Stephenson

Stephenson was the only catcher expected to have much chance of going in the top half of round one. He was also a legitimate prospect as a pitcher, but everyone was looking at him as a catcher, where his big arm will remain an asset. He offers big-time power potential, but he probably won’t turn into a particularly well-rounded hitter.

No. 12 pick – Marlins – high school first baseman Josh Naylor

The first Canadian taken, Naylor might offer the greatest power potential in the draft. He’s expected to be limited to first base, and he might not be much of an asset there. He could also be a big strikeout guy. The Marlins obviously have dreams of him protecting Giancarlo Stanton in the lineup someday, but it won’t happen anytime soon. He doesn’t even turn 18 for another two weeks.

No. 13 pick – Rays – high school outfielder Garrett Whitley

The Rays badly need this pick to work out after missing on so many first-rounders of late. Of course, this is the earliest they’ve picked since they grabbed Tim Beckham first overall in 2008. Whitley is a strong defensive center fielder with plenty of speed, and his swing should provide him with power in time.

No. 14 pick – Braves – high school left-hander Kolby Allard

The Braves are going with a West Coast guy in the first round for the first time since 1995, when they took, but didn’t sign, future Stanford quarterback Chad Hutchinson. Allard entered the year as a potential top-five pick, but a stress reaction in his back suffered in March damaged his stock. He could be a tough sign as a UCLA commit.

No. 15 pick – Brewers – high school outfielder Trent Clark

A left-handed hitter, Clark should hit for average and show at least doubles power. He could have gone even higher if teams were convinced he’d stay in center field, but it’s possible he’ll end up in left. The Brewers already have Tyrone Taylor and Monte Harrison as center field hopefuls, so it wouldn’t be such a disaster if Clark needs to slide over.

No. 16 pick – Yankees – UCLA right-hander James Kaprielian

Kaprielian is the biggest pitcher drafted so far, standing 6-foot-4. He should be one of the quickest movers among college pitchers, though he probably doesn’t have the ceiling of a Carson Fulmer. He’s just a low-90s guy with his fastball, but he has four pitches and fine command for someone his age.

No. 17 pick – Indians – left-hander Brady Aiken

The first overall pick from the 2014 draft is off the board. Aiken underwent Tommy John surgery in March, so he won’t begin pitching in the minors until next summer. He was viewed by most as the top talent in last year’s draft, and if his stuff comes all of the way back, he could prove to be a steal for the Indians. Obviously, there’s plenty of risk, but it’s a risk worth taking, considering that plenty of “safer” picks in this range don’t pan out.

No. 18 pick – Giants – Southern Nevada right-hander Phil Bickford

Bickford was the 10th overall pick out of high school in 2013, but he opted not to sign with the Blue Jays. His stuff has been up and down, more due to mechanical issues than any physical problems. He’s thrown in the mid-90s and shown a plus slider at times, and if he puts it all together, he could prove to be an excellent starter in time. Some believe he’s more likely to wind up in the pen.

2015 MLB Draft: Picks 6-10 – Twins pick college reliever sixth

Tyler Jay
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No. 6 pick – Twins – Illinois left-hander Tyler Jay

The Twins are going with a guy who has made one start in three years in college. Jay had a 0.60 ERA and a 70/7 K/BB ratio in 60 1/3 innings for Illinois this season. He works in the mid-90s, uses two breaking balls and has the makings of a changeup, so there is plenty of potential as a starter if the Twins choose to use him there. Still, that he hasn’t done it before would only add to the injury risk. It’s possible the Twins will bring him to the majors as a reliever after the All-Star break and then move him to the rotation next year.

No. 7 pick – Red Sox – Arkansas outfielder Andrew Benintendi

Benintendi was one of the draft’s fastest risers after hitting .380/.489/.715 with 19 homers in 221 at-bats for Arkansas. He’s a potential plus defensive center fielder and a left-handed hitter with power in a rather compact 5-foot-10, 170-pound package. He probably won’t move as quickly as the college infielders drafted ahead of him — particularly not with all of the outfielders ahead of him in Boston — but his ceiling is as high as anyone’s.

No. 8 pick – White Sox – Vanderbilt right-hander Carson Fulmer

Factoring in performance and potential, Fulmer appeared to be the top college pitcher available, though two went ahead of him. The White Sox also stumbled into the best college pitcher available last year when Carlos Rodon fell to the third pick. Fulmer lacks ideal size, at 6-foot-0 and 195 pounds, which might have scared off the Rangers and Twins. There’s a good chance he would have been Boston’s pick had the Astros taken Bentintendi. Fulmer was 13-2 with a 1.82 ERA and a 152/46 K/BB ratio in 114 innings for the Commodores this season. He probably won’t move quite as quickly as Rodon, but he could still be one of the first players here to reach the majors.

No. 9 pick – Cubs – Cincinnati outfielder Ian Happ

Happ might offer the greatest offensive potential of the college players picked so far, but he’d also seem to have the least defensive value. He played some second base at Cincinnati, but most expect he’ll end up in left or right. Happ is a switch-hitter with considerable power and on-base ability. He’s another college product likely to move quickly for the Cubs, like Kris Bryant and Kyle Schwarber before him.

No. 10 pick – Phillies – high school shortstop Cornelius Randolph

The Phillies already have an awesome shortstop in 2013 first-rounder J.P Crawford, but that’s not much of an issue here. Randolph offers a very promising left-handed bat, but he’s going to need to move off short. Ideally, he’d go to second base, but third and the outfield are also possibility. The youngest player take in the top 10, Randolph just turned 18 last week. He should show power in time.