Matthew Pouliot

Yankees' Rodriguez strikes out against the Orioles during Game 4 of their MLB ALDS baseball playoff series in New York

Sources: Alex Rodriguez to be suspended for 2013, 2014 seasons

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If Major League Baseball has its way, Alex Rodriguez won’t play again until the 2015 season.

Sources tell NBCSports.com that MLB plans to suspend Rodriguez for the remainder of the 2013 season and the entire 2014 campaign.

That’s better than the lifetime suspension that MLB was originally shooting for with its evidence that Rodriguez has used PEDs since the 2009 season. It’d also have a better chance of holding up in arbitration than the lifetime ban. Still, with Rodriguez prepared to fight, the league could have its hands full in a court case. Its top source for information, Biogenesis owner Anthony Bosch, is a liar and is the subject of a federal investigation, and a Rodriguez lawsuit could require the league to release information it’d much rather keep private.

Hopeful of returning to the Yankees lineup this week, Rodriguez, who had offseason hip surgery, homered Friday in a rehab game for Double-A Trenton and walked four times Saturday. He told reporters after Saturday’s game that he plans to be with the Yankees when they play in Chicago on Monday.

“We’re going to have a workout (Sunday) and then fly to Chicago,” Rodriguez said, per the Associated Press. “I’ve been on the field for the last five and a half hours. I haven’t heard anything or seen anything.”

MLB, though, plans to announce its suspension of Rodriguez on Monday and prevent him from playing during the appeal process by using the in-the-best-interests-of-baseball clause that commissioner Bud Selig holds.

The league is also expected to announce several other suspensions Monday, with Rangers outfielder Nelson Cruz, Tigers shortstop Jhonny Peralta and Padres shortstop Everth Cabera likely facing bans of at least 50 games.

After three years, Pedro Feliciano returns to majors

New York Mets v Philadelphia Phillies
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Pedro Feliciano had his contract purchased by the Mets on Friday and is back in the majors for the first time since 2010.

After making a whopping 92 appearances with the Mets in 2010, Feliciano signed a two-year, $8 million deal with the Yankees over that winter. He went down the next spring with what was originally called triceps soreness and then missed two years after shoulder surgery. He returned to the Mets on a minor league deal this spring, only to be set back by a heart condition. As if that wasn’t enough, after debuting in the minors in April, he was stricken by a case of severe food poisoning that cost him over a month.

Feliciano, who turns 37 later this month, ended up posting a 1.29 ERA and a 19/4 K/BB ratio in 21 innings in the minors. His velocity isn’t what it used to be, but he might still be capable of finessing his way through some left-handed hitters. Regardless, it’s a nice story that he’s getting another shot. He was a horse for the Mets in the second half of the last decade. From 2007 through 2010, he averaged 86 appearances per year.

To put that in perspective, since 2007, only two other pitchers have made 86 appearances in a season: Jon Rauch (88 in 2007) and Peter Moylan (86 in 2009). Last year, the major league leaders had 80 appearances.

Report: Red Sox owner John Henry to buy Boston Globe

Liverpool Football club's co-owner, John
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Peter Gammons reports that Red Sox owner John Henry will be the new owner of the Boston Globe.

It’s surprising news, as the Boston Globe, reporting on its own fate, stated last week that Henry had dropped out of the bidding.

The New York Times previously owned 17.75 percent of the Fenway Sports Group, the company that owns the Red Sox and NESN, only to sell its shares in 2011 and 2012. It announced its intentional to sell the Globe back in February.

If Henry completes his purchase of the Globe, the already cozy relationship between the Red Sox and the paper could grow more intertwined.

The bids for the Globe were expected to come in around $100 million, according to Bloomberg. The Times originally paid $1.1 billion, mostly in stock, to acquire the Globe in 1993.