Author: Matthew Pouliot

Felix Hernandez

Heyman: King Felix has no interest in four-year deal

32 Comments’s Ken Rosenthal reported earlier in the week that the Mariners were considering offering Felix Hernandez a four-year, $100 million extension that would kick in after his current deal expires and cover the 2015-18 seasons. But if they were still weighing the possibility, CBS Sports’ Jon Heyman says they might as well forget it: reported a few days ago that the Mariners were thinking about a four-year extension for $25 million a year, and while it’s not known whether such an offer has been made or even suggested yet, indications from people familiar with the discussions are that such a proposal would be a non-starter for the starter generally considered one of the best two or three in the game.

Heyman says it’d take a six-year offer to get Hernandez to the table now. But that wouldn’t make much sense for Seattle. The only reason to extend him this winter, when he still has two years left on his deal, is if he’d be willing to give them a discount. Since it seems that’s not in the cards, the Mariners should let 2013 play out and then try to hammer out something next winter.

Hernandez is due $39.5 million over the next two seasons before he becomes eligible for free agency after the 2014 campaign. That could be a huge winter if both Hernandez and Justin Verlander make it to free agency, but chances are that one or both will sign extensions before then.

Frank Thomas hoping for Hall of Fame enshrinement next year

Frank Thomas

In town for SoxFest on Saturday, Frank Thomas was his typical direct self in expressing his desire to enter Cooperstown next winter and in labeling the numbers of steroid users “fake.”’s Dan Hayes has the story, which includes a video interview.

Thomas has a very clear sense of his place in history, and he knows he ranks among the elite. And while bitter might not be the right word, he still takes issue over losing the 2000 AL MVP award to a player in Jason Giambi who later admitted to cheating.

“I spent my whole career working my butt off and hopefully I get what I deserve,” Thomas said. “Of course I would be disappointed [if unelected]. I’m not going to lie to you. Of course I will. Like I said, I think my resume speaks for itself. Losing a third MVP to a guy who admitted he was PED, I think that would have put me at another level that only a couple of guys have enjoyed ever in this game. The 12-year-run I had was incredible, very historical. So, I think I’ve done enough to be a first-ballot Hall of Famer.”

Thomas is right about that. He’s also right about the MVP thing. The only player ever to win more than three is Barry Bonds, one of those with “fake” numbers, according to Thomas. Yogi Berra, Roy Campanella, Joe DiMaggio, Jimmie Foxx, Mickey Mantle, Stan Musial, Albert Pujols, Alex Rodriguez and Mike Schmidt all won three apiece.

Greg Maddux and Tom Glavine will join Thomas on the ballot for the first time next year. Thomas indicated that he’d like to see those two and Craig Biggio share the stage with him at induction.

Rockies, Jhoulys Chacin agree to $6.5 million deal

Jhoulys Chacin
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A long-term deal didn’t make a lot of sense after Jhoulys Chacin’s poor 2012 season, but the right-hander and Rockies did find common ground on a two-year, $6.5 million pact on Saturday.

The deal takes care of Chacin’s first two years of arbitration. He’ll again be eligible for arbitration in 2015 before he qualifies for free agency following that season.

The 25-year-old Chacin asked for $2.6 million and was offered $1.7 million in arbitration  Assuming that the two sides would have settled at the $2.15 million midpoint, this essentially gets him under control for 2014 at $4.35 million.

Chacin looked like one of the NL’s most promising young pitchers two years ago, posting ERAs of 3.28 and 3.62 and WHIPs of 1.27 and 1.31 in his first two seasons with the Rockies. Adjusting for Coors Field, those were particularly strong marks.

Chacin, though, struggled right from the get-go in 2012, showing neither his usual velocity nor a quality slider before being diagnosed with shoulder inflammation and, later, a nerve issue in his chest. He did rebound at the very end of the season, though, going 3-2 with a 2.84 ERA in his last nine starts.

Lifetime, Chacin has a 3.05 ERA in 29 starts and eight relief appearances away from Coors Field. He’s 23-31 with a 3.68 ERA overall.

Landon Powell loses baby daughter to liver condition

Izzy Powell

There’s some very sad news to report tonight, as Landon Powell, the former A’s catcher currently employed by the Mets, has lost his baby daughter, Izzy, after a four-month ordeal.

Izzy, one of two twin sisters born prematurely (the other, Ellie, is alive and well), was diagnosed with hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis, which led to a liver to large for her body. If she had survived longer, she could have received a bone marrow transplant from her older brother. However, she was never in the kind of condition that would have permitted such a surgery.

You can read more about all the Powell family (Landon, Allyson, Holden and Ellie)  has been going through at their facebook page,  Prayers for Izzy.

Our condolences go out to the Powell family.

Uptons to follow in footsteps of Alous, Conigliaros, Waners

Felipe, Matty and Jesus Alou

With B.J. and Justin Upton getting together in Atlanta, I thought it’d be fun to look at the other MLB outfields to pair siblings. The Uptons are the fourth set of brothers charged with patrolling the same outfield. Here’s how the first three fared:

Felipe, Jesus and Matty Alou

1961-63 Giants
Felipe: .296/.336/.486, 63 HR, 232 RBI in 1,541 AB – 125 OPS+
Matty: .276/.325/.380, 9 HR, 40 RBI in 471 AB – 92 OPS+

1964-65 Giants
Matty: .246/.286/.303, 3 HR, 32 RBI in 574 AB – 65 OPS+
Jesus: .288.312/.369, 12 HR, 80 RBI in 919 AB – 90 OPS+

1973 Yankees
Felipe: .236/.256/.321, 4 HR, 27 RBI in 280 AB – 65 OPS+
Matty: .296/.338/.356, 2 HR, 28 RBI in 497 AB – 100 OPS+

Felipe, Matty and Jesus were all briefly part of the 1963 Giants, but I didn’t count that, since Jesus got just 24 at-bats in 16 games as a rookie that season.

Felipe was obviously the best of the brothers, but his two best seasons came in Atlanta in 1966 (.327/.361/.533, league-leading 218 hits, 122 runs) and 1968 (.317/.365/.438, league-leading 210 hits).

Before their late-career reunion with the Yankees, Felipe and Matty just missed each other and Jesus in Oakland. Felipe played for the A’s in 1970 and briefly in 1971, Matty played their in 1972 and Jesus was there in 1973 and ’74.

Billy and Tony Conigliaro

1969-70 Red Sox
Billy: .274/.343/.479, 22 HR, 65 RBI in 478 AB – 119 OPS+
Tony: .261/.323/.464, 56 HR, 198 RBI in 1,066 AB – 111 OPS+

Everyone knows what happened with Tony; his time with his brother came after he missed the 1968 season following a beaning. A Hall of Fame-type talent, he was already dealing with the deteriorating eyesight that forced him out of baseball.

What I didn’t realize is that Billy looks like quite a talent himself. That 119 OPS+ came in his age 21 and 22 seasons. However, he wasn’t happy with the Red Sox after they traded Tony following the 1970 season, and it seems to show up in his performance. He hit .262/.310/.436 in 1971 and then got traded himself. Struggling with the Brewers, he retired in the middle of the 1972 season while still just 24 years old. He did try a comeback the next year, getting into 48 games with the A’s, but that was it for his career.

Lloyd and Paul Waner

1927-40 Pirates
Lloyd: .319/.356/.400, 27 HR, 573 RBI in 7,219 AB – 100 OPS+
Paul: .341/.406/.487, 101 HR, 1,098 RBI in 7,893 AB – 136 OPS+

The Waners were also very briefly teammates on the 1941 Boston Braves and again on the 1944 Brooklyn Dodgers, but both were well past their primes by then.

Both Waners made it into the Hall of Fame, Paul in 1952 and Lloyd in 1967. Paul was obviously deserving. He won three batting crowns and finished in the top 10 in the NL in average nine times, in OBP 13 times and in slugging seven times. Lloyd, while a solid enough regular, was a rider of coattails. He finished in the top 10 in the NL in average six times, but just once higher than eighth (third in 1927). He was in the top 10 in OBP once (ninth in 1927) and never in slugging. He finished his career with a 99 OPS+, compared to 134 for Paul.