Author: Matthew Pouliot

Robin Yount

The Brewers are celebrating the 20th anniversary of Robin Yount’s retirement tonight


2013 wasn’t a very good year for the Brewers to come up with anniversaries. 2012 was the 30th anniversary of the best team the franchise has ever put together, the 1982 Brewers that won 95 games and lost the World Series to the Cardinals in seven games.

But 2013?

30 years ago: 87-75, fifth place in the AL East
25 years ago: 85-75, third place in AL East
20 years ago: 69-93, seventh place in the AL East
15 years ago: 74-88, fifth place in the NL Central
10 years ago: 68-94, sixth place in the NL Central

So, yeah, picking out a player to honor from the group was the best idea, and there’s no better player in Brewers history than Robin Yount, who played his final game on Oct. 2, 1993 for that 69-93 team. Yount started so young that he was just 37 when he retired and still got 20 years in. He was a decent enough player when he called it quits, too, hitting .258/.326/.379 in 454 at-bats in his final year. 20 years later, he still ranks as the Brewers’ all-time leader in hits (3,142), runs (1,632), doubles (583), triples (126), homers (251), RBI (1,406) and walks (966), and the only one of those marks that will fall anytime soon is the homers, with Ryan Braun 40 away.

The ceremony for Yount will begin at 6:45 p.m. CDT tonight and stream live on

Red Sox score six in ninth to beat Mariners 8-7

Jonny Gomes

The Red Sox sent 10 men to the plate in a six-run ninth to overcome a terrific effort from Felix Hernandez and defeat the Mariners 8-7 on Thursday, completing a three-game sweep at Fenway Park.

According to the win expectancy data at Fangraphs, the Red Sox entered the ninth with exactly a one percent chance of winning. It would have been even less than that if not for Shane Victorino’s solo homer off Charlie Furbush in the eighth, making it a 7-2 game.

The ninth was fueled by walks, three of them in all. Mariners closer Tom Wilhelmsen, who lost his job earlier this season because of control problems, issued two of them and allowed two hits without ever retiring a batter. He was pulled from a 7-3 game.

The plan then was to go to Yoervis Medina with Shane Victorino and Dustin Pedroia due up. However, the umpiring crew said that Mariners acting manager Robby Thompson, who is filling in while Eric Wedge recovers from a mild stroke, signaled with his left hand instead of his right, calling Oliver Perez into the game. Perez has been plenty good against right-handers this season anyway, so it wasn’t necessarily a huge problem. However, he gave up back-to-back hits before striking out David Ortiz for the first out of the frame.

Medina was finally called into what was a 7-6 game at that point. He appeared to have Jonny Gomes struck out on a 2-2 pitch, but David Rackley, who had a terribly inconsistent strike zone all night, called the pitch on the corner a ball. Gomes went on to single in the tying run. After Stephen Drew walked, Daniel Nava hit a ball to the wall in center, ending the game and giving the Red Sox their second walkoff win in about 21 hours.

For Hernandez, it was the fifth time this season in which he’s allowed just one run and ended up with a no-decision. It also happened last time out when he pitched nine innings and struck out 11 against the Twins.

The Red Sox improved to 66-44 with the sweep. Their .600 winning percentage is better by only the Pirates’ .602 mark.

Twins send down Aaron Hicks, Scott Diamond

Aaron Hicks

Let’s face it: most of the good news for the Twins this year has come from the minors, as Byron Buxton and Miguel Sano have emerged as two of the game’s top five prospects. What’s happened with the major league club has been mostly bad.

That’s especially the case with Scott Diamond, the team’s best starter while going 12-9 with a 3.54 ERA as a rookie last year, and Aaron Hicks, the team’s former No. 1 prospect who won the center field job this spring. Both were demoted back to the minors on Thursday.

Diamond, whose season didn’t start until mid-April following December surgery to remove a bone chip from his elbow, was 5-10 with a 5.52 ERA and just 45 strikeouts in 107 2/3 innings. He had turned in just three quality starts in 2 1/2 months, and he gave up six earned runs in a loss to the Royals on Thursday. The Twins felt it was time to take a look at someone else, probably Andrew Albers, and now that the trade deadline passed without a Mike Pelfrey trade, that opportunity is coming at Diamond’s expense.

The 23-year-old Hicks showed improvement in June and the first half of July, but he had slumped again of late, leaving him at .192/.259/.338 in 281 at-bats for the season. The Twins took quite a risk this spring when they opted to have him skip Triple-A and go right to the majors, and it’s clear now that it didn’t pay off. Still, Hicks is young enough that no one is giving up on him yet. He’ll be back in September, and he’ll probably get another chance to play regularly then. In the meantime, the Twins will go with Clete Thomas in center and give Oswaldo Arcia another chance in a corner. The 21-year-old Arcia was recalled today after hitting .375/.490/.725 with four homers in 13 games for Triple-A Rochester last month.