Matthew Pouliot

Boston Red Sox Jacoby Ellsbury scores at home plate as New York Yankees Austin Romine cannot hold the throw in their MLB game in New York

Red Sox best Mariano Rivera, beat Yankees in 10 innings


Call it “Deja Drew.”

After the Red Sox let a five-run lead slip away, things were going all according to plan for the Yankees on Thursday. David Robertson pitched a perfect eighth up 8-7, and Mariano Rivera retired the first two batters he faced in the ninth. That’s when things unraveled.

Mike Napoli, who was 0-for-5 with three strikeouts lifetime against Rivera, took a two-strike cutter into right-center for a single. September callup Quintin Berry pinch-ran, immediately took off for second and then kept right on going, reaching third when Austin Romine’s throw went into center field.

Stephen Drew, on the very next pitch, got a cutter left over the plate and drove it over Robinson Cano’s head, tying the game at 8.

It was eerily reminiscent of Game 4 of the 2004 ALCS, when the Red Sox used a Kevin Millar walk, a David Roberts steal and then a Bill Mueller single to tie the game off Rivera, kicking off the greatest comeback in MLB history (they were down three games to none and came back to win the series in seven).

The Red Sox went on to win this one off Joba Chamberlain in the 10th after Jacoby Ellsbury singles, stole second and came around to score on a Shane Victorino single. There was some controversy mixed in; Victorino appeared to strike out on the pitch prior to the single, but first-base ump Joe West ruled he checked his swing.

Koji Uehara followed with a flawless bottom of the 10th for his 18th save.

The blown save was Rivera’s sixth in 47 chances this year. That’s his high total since 2003, when he was 40-for-46. His career high for blown saves was nine, from his first year as a closer in 1997.

It wasn’t a particularly well-played four-hour game for the old rivals. The most notable example came in the bottom of the ninth, when Alfonso Soriano stole the Yankees’ sixth base of the game despite being picked off first, only to follow that with a caught stealing of third base when he was again picked off by Craig Breslow.

On the go-ahead run in the 10th, Romine appeared to have a play on Ellsbury at the plate, but he couldn’t handle the bounce throw from Ichiro Suzuki in right field.

Ivan Nova, the AL Pitcher of the Month for August, came out after throwing 96 pitches in four innings. He gave up three runs. Jake Peavy was better, but the Red Sox brought him back out for the seventh at 105 pitches and he allowed back-to-back batters to reach, kicking off a six-run inning that brought the Yankees back from a 7-2 deficit.

Reds make it three out of four, defeat Cardinals 6-2

Todd Frazier

If they hadn’t gotten so bunt happy on Wednesday, the Reds might have made it a clean sweep. As is, they should be pretty pleased to have taken three out of four from the visiting Cardinals with their 6-2 win on Thursday.

Todd Frazier hit two of the Reds’ four homers in support of Tony Cingrani, who struck out seven in his first start back from the DL. Cingrani allowed two runs in 5 1/3 innings while improving to 7-3.

The Reds also got homers from Shin-Soo Choo and Jay Bruce. The only bad news on the night was that Brandon Phillips was lost to a quad contusion, though he might be back on Friday.

The Cardinals’ big concern at the end of the night was the continued struggles of All-Star Lance Lynn. He’s 0-5 in his last six starts, giving up 26 earned runs in 34 innings over the span. Tonight, he surrendered three of the four homers, allowing four runs over five innings in all. He’s now 13-10 with a 4.37 ERA for the season.

Thanks to the Reds, the idle Pirates now have a 1 1/2-game lead in the NL Central at 81-58. The Cards are 80-60, with the Reds three games back at 79-62.

Adam Jones reaches 30 homers, 100 RBI… and 20 walks!

Adam Jones

Orioles All-Star center fielder Adam Jones hit a solo homer in the first inning Thursday against the White Sox, giving him 30 homers and 100 RBI on the season.

Three innings later, he reached another little milestone: he walked for the 20th time in 567 at-bats.

Barring a stunning turn of events, Jones is about to become the 57th player (37th different) in major league history to hit 30 homers and finish with more homers than walks. Adrian Beltre was the last to do it, finishing with 32 homers and 25 walks for the Rangers in 2011. Alfonso Soriano has done it three times, most recently in 2007. The only other active player to have done it was Ryan Braun in his rookie year (34 HR, 29 BB).  Juan Gonzalez did it four times.

The lack of walks certainly hasn’t stopped Jones from being a very valuable player these last couple of years. He’s currently batting .295, so his OBP (.326 at the moment) isn’t too bad. This is his second straight 30-homer season after he hit 32 last year, and he’s well on his way to scoring 100 runs again (92 right now).