Matthew Pouliot

braun getty

Ryan Braun calls Brewers season-ticket holders to apologize

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Sure, it’s PR through and through, but it’s also kind of neat.

Ryan Braun, currently serving a 65-game suspension from MLB for his performance-enhancing drug usage, is calling Brewers season-ticket holders to apologize for his transgressions.

CBS 58 in Milwaukee reached out to one of the ticket holders, Pat Guenther, and got some quotes from the bar owner.

“I said what can I do for you? He said, I messed up, in a nutshell, I messed up,” Guenther told CBS 58. “I just want to reach out and say I’m sorry. I cut him off right there. I said you know Ryan, I think you’re an amazing athlete and this speaks volumes to your character to reach out to a small business owner like myself and let us know that you are going to do better.”

Considering that the Brewers didn’t reach out and let the ticket owners know this was happening, one can’t help but wonder how many times Braun got hung up on by some fan figuring it was some sort of prank. Guenther said he knew it was really Braun based on his TV interviews.

This all seems like a better step forward for Braun than the statement he released last month. He hasn’t held any news conferences or done any interviews since his suspension was announced. He apologized in his release, but he needs to put himself out there if he intends to win back his fans.

Mark Trumbo declines to rip the statheads

Mark Trumbo
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Mark Trumbo went to the All-Star Game last year and is about to notch a second straight 30-homer, 90-RBI season, so he could easily fall back on the old “I get paid to produce runs” line. It’s nice to see that he doesn’t.

“The casual fan would probably be pretty pumped up when they see the baseball-card numbers, and the new-age fans are probably not going to be too terribly thrilled with a player like me,” Trumbo told MLB.com’s Alden Gonzalez. “But you know what, at the end of the day, you are who you are. I want to get better and do what I do.”

By the new-age fans, Trumbo is referring to those who would point to his current .291 OBP.  His career mark is .299. Of the 251 first basemen since 1900 to amass 1,500 plate appearances in the majors, Trumbo ranks 238th in OBP.

On the other hand, Trumbo has 90 homers and 268 RBI in three seasons of playing time. That makes him an asset, even if he’s more of a No. 5 or No. 6 hitter than someone who should bat cleanup with any regularity.

“I do quite a few things well, and there are some things I don’t do well, which are quite obvious,” Trumbo said. “Unfortunately, you tend to dwell on what you want to get better at. I spend quite a bit of time trying to figure out how I can do certain things better.”

Another player in Trumbo’s situation might be content with his lot. That Trumbo isn’t bodes better for his future.  The Angels declared him off limits in trade talks this summer, and he’s still being viewed as one of their building blocks.

Red Sox best Mariano Rivera, beat Yankees in 10 innings

Boston Red Sox Jacoby Ellsbury scores at home plate as New York Yankees Austin Romine cannot hold the throw in their MLB game in New York
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Call it “Deja Drew.”

After the Red Sox let a five-run lead slip away, things were going all according to plan for the Yankees on Thursday. David Robertson pitched a perfect eighth up 8-7, and Mariano Rivera retired the first two batters he faced in the ninth. That’s when things unraveled.

Mike Napoli, who was 0-for-5 with three strikeouts lifetime against Rivera, took a two-strike cutter into right-center for a single. September callup Quintin Berry pinch-ran, immediately took off for second and then kept right on going, reaching third when Austin Romine’s throw went into center field.

Stephen Drew, on the very next pitch, got a cutter left over the plate and drove it over Robinson Cano’s head, tying the game at 8.

It was eerily reminiscent of Game 4 of the 2004 ALCS, when the Red Sox used a Kevin Millar walk, a David Roberts steal and then a Bill Mueller single to tie the game off Rivera, kicking off the greatest comeback in MLB history (they were down three games to none and came back to win the series in seven).

The Red Sox went on to win this one off Joba Chamberlain in the 10th after Jacoby Ellsbury singles, stole second and came around to score on a Shane Victorino single. There was some controversy mixed in; Victorino appeared to strike out on the pitch prior to the single, but first-base ump Joe West ruled he checked his swing.

Koji Uehara followed with a flawless bottom of the 10th for his 18th save.

The blown save was Rivera’s sixth in 47 chances this year. That’s his high total since 2003, when he was 40-for-46. His career high for blown saves was nine, from his first year as a closer in 1997.

It wasn’t a particularly well-played four-hour game for the old rivals. The most notable example came in the bottom of the ninth, when Alfonso Soriano stole the Yankees’ sixth base of the game despite being picked off first, only to follow that with a caught stealing of third base when he was again picked off by Craig Breslow.

On the go-ahead run in the 10th, Romine appeared to have a play on Ellsbury at the plate, but he couldn’t handle the bounce throw from Ichiro Suzuki in right field.

Ivan Nova, the AL Pitcher of the Month for August, came out after throwing 96 pitches in four innings. He gave up three runs. Jake Peavy was better, but the Red Sox brought him back out for the seventh at 105 pitches and he allowed back-to-back batters to reach, kicking off a six-run inning that brought the Yankees back from a 7-2 deficit.